A sketch in time


Buy the new book, "Beaucoup Arlo & Janis!"Today's "Arlo & Janis!"
I’ve told you I don’t sketch much, and that’s true. That doesn’t mean I never sketch. These are some selected doodles of late, as I kick around yet again an ancient concept from the recesses of my brain. Speaking of recess, I can say I am exploring ideas, but I think in reality these sketches depict what I’d rather be doing than what I am actually doing at the moment. Note the mermaid: I have always thought real mermaids probably more closely resemble manatees than fish. I mean, that makes sense, doesn’t it? And they probably aren’t quite as pretty and don’t sing quite as well as we give them credit. Anyway, don’t ask me what this is all really about, because I can’t say.

115 thoughts on “A sketch in time”

  1. I am glad to see the theme of the strips the last couple of days. I am seeing too many people not staying hydrated in the heat. Working on the set of ‘Salem’ this year we had somebody go through what Janice is going through nearly every day. REMINDER…..drink plenty of water!!!!

  2. A manatee like Mermaid? Never thought of that quite like that. Like the little sketches, proves ya gots talents ta burn, of course we knew that. Over in the comments on go comics there seems to be lots of controversy over what to call a slightly older woman. Here in my area they solve that by servers calling both men and women honey and sweety when they a person gets older. It amuses my wife and I no end.

  3. Maybe I have a cruel streak but when we went to Disney World years ago, we went to Ariel’s Undersea Adventure and I remember whispering to my son “I wonder what would happen if I yelled “Fire””. As he started laughing uncontrollably, I told him that I would probably end up in jail!

  4. I like the sketches and the concept they present (kids, ocean, sailing, freedom, and a tinge of fantasy). I see a Sunday only serial, along the lines Prince Valiant. Yes, I read PV as a kid. I even had an aunt named Aleta (again yes, after the Princess of the same name). Would probably still read it today if I had access to it.

  5. …or even a web-only thing, like Pibgorn(sp?) as the counterpart of Chickweed Lane that gets away with more. I would subscribe to anything you did!

    As for the mermaids, I have thought that a marne mammal made more sense as well. I seem to remember one of those mass-produced sculptures in the ’80s that had done one with a dolphin tail.

    At any rate, can’t wait, and glad to see Janis is going to be ok!

  6. Steve from Royal Oak, MI: remember, even the walls have ears (mouse ears) and eyes. I had the experience of having the Pirates of the Caribbean ride being stopped in between the drops. Somebody in the boat (not me) stood up and changed seats. The ride stopped and a voice came over the speakers telling them to move back, or their ride was over. They returned to their original seat and the ride started again.

  7. Bryan: I still read Prince Valiant on Comics Kingdom, similar to Go Comics. Several other favorites there also. I love the elaborate art on PV.

  8. Anon at 12:31 was me. I was posting from the cellphone in a doctor’s office, and the phone evidently doesn’t have my name on it.

    Mark: You are truly the Linkmeister!!!

  9. Hum. I just noticed that The Little Mermaid has a belly button. That brings to mind several questions about how merpeople reproduce, none of which I should probably pursue here.

  10. JJ has told us. In the last [I think] segment of the Janis/mermaid series, her note to Arlo said she was going down to the Antarctic to spawn. So mermaids nurse their young but reproduce like fishes. Sing., fish [e.g., 1 eel]; pl., fish [2 eels]; multi-spp. pl., fishes [an eel and a walleye, or eels and walleyes].

    Reminds me of a perhaps apocryphal story:

    Prof: “… And that, students, is how fishes reproduce.”

    Sweet young thing: “You mean they don’t . . ., they never . . . uh . . .?”

    Prof: “Right! And that is the origin of the expression, ‘Poor fish.’ “

  11. Two Indians had the good fortune to actually see a mermaid on a rock. They had a good look, and after she had dived under water, one Indian turned to the other and said, “How?”

  12. Debbe πŸ˜‰ In answer to your questions about where I found all the pictures of Lorraine, the InterWebNet is full of them. Apparently she is a big deal on the telly in the UK, having hosted morning shows for about 30 years, and she must be heavily covered in their press.

    I even found a putatively untouched photo of her wearing a bikini to celebrate a weight loss, a la Valerie Bertinelli and Melissa Joan Hart. And she didn’t look bad for a lady of 55 years.

  13. Charlotte in NH, probably same as dolphins!

    By the way, look up dugong in your online resource of choice. They are the Old World relative of the manatee and considered the probable source of inspiration for the mermaid. After all, no one in Europe saw a manatee till after they made it to the New World.

  14. Was a Dugong on Jules Vern’s Mysterious Island.

    In my mind it was a Pacific island – but how did the balloon get blown all that way?
    Somewhere near Africa?

    Somewhere near Nevernever Land?

    Other’s thoughts?

  15. An old artsy friend of mine used to bemoan, “There is a style to anything I draw. I wish there wasn’t. I want the image to stand on its own. Not be attributable to me. But no matter what I do, I can put it with a thousand other works by a thousand other artists, give you two samples of mine, and you can pick out the third immediately.” Her complaint struck me as silly as those people who don’t like their own spoken accent. Anywho, your sketches look very A&J, or if you prefer Jimmy Johnson-ish, and I don’t mean that as an insult.

  16. “There is nothing like a dame,” those guys were at sea for weeks/months, and [I think], both manatees and dugongs have pectoral nipples. The sailors may even have seen nursing pups. But neither dugongs nor manatees were as pretty as Janis.

    Beats me. emb

  17. Good morning Villagers…

    In answer to your question Jerry, I was laid off from the hotel, drawing unemployment, taking online classes to freshen up my computer skills…sent out resumes. Was offered a job in sales…turned it down. I was fed up with the corporate world. Then my sister-in-law was going to start working for this poultry house because the two older ladies were retiring. I just phones up The Boss, told his daughter who I was and got hired. No resume, no application….and I’m still there almost 4 years later. I think it was almost a week before I met The Boss. He still hasn’t been by to meet Shirley….I guess he trusts me.

    OMG, Lorraine is 50ish….I used to look that good when I was 50 πŸ™‚ That’s a joke son.

    Miss Charlotte…good to see your post….miss your posting too. Are you ok? I hope I didn’t upset you with my comment on being blessed to smell the flowers, I meant that in a kind way.

    And Denise is MIA also.

    gptta go, laundry is in dryer….drying….hahahahaha

    ya’ll have a blessed day

  18. Debbe-
    Thanks for the link to the Joan Jett version cover. I never heard it before, but she has the voice and style to make it work.

  19. If COGWSOTW actually practiced medicine for 50 years, he’s seen a lot more (and more interesting) stuff than Janis’s pokies. πŸ˜‰

    Debbe πŸ˜‰ I saw on TDS that someone apparently has a burr under her saddle about being addressed as “young lady”, “honey” or “hon”. (She came across as a person who’s probably fortunate that anyone addresses her at all.) But I wanted to make sure that you didn’t find it offensive when I address you as “hon”, which I do a lot, but only as a term of endearment.

  20. I cringe when someone calls me “Hon” or “Honey” but then I am a Grumpy Old Bear.
    I tend to call (men) customers Guy (would not do that in England) when I forget their name,
    which is more often lately. And I might say “this young lady” when asking advice of a coworker.
    But it is better than “whosis” or Umm.

  21. Back when I was in Uncle Sam’s Navy, the Coast Guard was known as the Draft Dodger’s Yacht Club. We also claimed that you had to be more than six feet tall to join so that if your ship ever sank, you could wade ashore.

  22. quote: “real mermaids probably more closely resemble manatees than fish”

    one aspect of this that cannot be overlooked is that the twiggy ideal of beauty is only very recent. In more reasonable times, men had a more Rubenesque ideal.

  23. I believe that Tees does not understand kinky. Slathering women in Russian dressing, sauerkraut, and slices of Swiss cheese; very off putting. Honey or chocolate yes.

  24. Jerry in FL, I lived in that area when I first moved to Nashville. Was very nice, then the gangs started moving in. All the stores in the area began moving out. Hickory Hollow Mall finally closed after multiple incidents. Not really a nice part of town anymore. Lots of assaults, thievery, murder, etc now. I’m surprised the theater was still open.

  25. Twenty-nine-year-old man, possibly homeless, assaults movie theater full of people with pepper spray, a hatchet, and a toy gun; points toy gun at SWAT team; will make no additional bad decisions.

  26. Yes, the officers should have waited to see if the projectiles he fired penetrated their bodies or just bounced off. What’s so hard about that?

  27. Dear Debbe, please don’t worry; nothing you’ve ever said has upset me. It’s just laziness and procrastination that sometimes keeps me from posting. And, I wouldn’t lie to you, Facebook has kept me away from the Village the last couple of days. There are groups on FB and one is called “You know you’re from (name of home town goes here) if you …” People post old photos, snapshots, school class photos (8th Grade group picture in 1947 for instance). People ask “do you remember the old guy who had the store on the corner… or the older woman who made and sold doughnuts back in the 1960’s from a small shack called “The Bird’s Nest” — true story. Well, it can kind of suck you in, maybe not the best use of my precious time. As one of the older people from my home town, I can tell lots of stories about who used to live where, and who is related to who else. I don’t live in our home town any more, but am only 15 miles away from it. Figuring out the names of the kids in the school class pictures is interesting too.

    Debbe, I like the story of how you got to work in the henhouse. Seems like a nice change from hotel work. Still thinking of Ian and wishing him well. I hope your computer holds up and gives you no problems while he isn’t there to straighten it out!

  28. We also owe much to our police officers who serve and protect. Many are quick to judge them, but few would ride beside them on a highly basis.

  29. emb, I started to give a reply about the ACLU, and thought better of it as unworthy of discussion here. Peace, Mark. There are good police and bad police, but without them this society would be even worse off than it is.

  30. About 50YA there was a study about overcrowding done with rats. It was found that at a certain
    point the rats started turning on each other – hair loss, loss of appetite, ETC – as a human society I think we are there. There are projected 2 billion (that is with a “B”) increase of population by
    2050. The program said population will max out at 9 Billion – I don’t know how they figure
    it will stop unless we have a world wide will. The politicians certainly don’t have it now.
    Back in the 50’s there was a group pushing for ZPG (Zero Population Growth) world population has more than doubled since then. I wonder what happened to them – a very light breeze in a gale of unconcern and self serving.

    Reading Eric Sloane the guiding force of our Forefathers was building for the future what was best for the following generations. It seems it is all what is in it for ME – NOW. I am sure there
    is some looking to the future but it is a hard battle and they are overwhelmed.

    Here endeth the rant for the day

    Hugs for those that need them.

  31. Good morning Villagers….

    Read the article on the shooting at the theater…..kind of ironic that they were showing “Mad Max”…and then they are going to have a special showing of it at a later date…..then there was Tina Turner in “Beyond the Thunderdome”….good movies, if you liked Mel Gibson at that time, which I did. He starred in a movie with Piper Laurie in his early years. Played the role of a mentally challenged young man. I’m sure Mark can find the name of the move faster than I can.

    Miss Charlotte…I worked at that hotel for 7 years, the last 4 as head of housekeeping….I still carry the scars on my back. I told Shirley (she’s afraid of hens) the worse they could do would be to peck your eye out…..just kidding I told her. She was excited that she ran down and caught her first runaway hen and put the Miss Prissy back in a cage.

    And Ian called last night to check on me….he has a prospect in working for a construction company…..I pray it comes true. Said they would be by on Sunday.

    The Boss came by yesterday to check on me too……he knows I’m having a rough time of it, between Ian leaving and losing Mom….he is going out of town with a couple of his sisters to see about moving their mother from N. Carolina to back here. He asked me who was working this weekend…told him I was, both Saturday and Sunday….I want to, as Old Bear said once…activity.

    gotta go….

    making pork loin sandwiches for lunch for Shirley and me…..smothered in Mayonnaise πŸ™‚

    ya’ll have a blessed day

  32. Bear – I’ve read about that study and I think you have a point. I’ve always thought a lot of our problems were due to the increase in population. Even without overcrowding, say .1% of the population is flawed in such a way that they can be a danger to themselves & others. When your population is 1,000 – that is 1 person. In such a population, that person would become known and thus more easily dealt with. Now increase the population to 200,000,000. You now have 200,000 problems and the capability for them to hide in the crowd much more effectively. Or gang together.

    I think humanity has reached its Malthusian limit, so criminal acts are just one of the things that we will have to face in the future. Plague and war come to mind. Hopefully we will find a way to cope with the stresses that avoids catastrophes, but it’s a balancing act and the boat is rocking.

  33. Old Bear and Judy. You are right to be concerned. Any ecologist/biologist not blinded by dogma knows there is a carrying capacity for any species in any ecosystem, and that includes us in our much altered [and generally degraded] human environment. My guess is we are some 8x too many for Earth as it is, and there is no place else to go, feasibly. My guess also is that politicians of ALL stripes will not have the wisdom and courage to handle this. I may escape the catastrophe, but doubt my grandkids will.

    “Back in the ’50s there was a group pushing for ZPG (Zero Population Growth) world population has more than doubled since then. I wonder what happened to them – a very light breeze in a gale of unconcern and self serving.” ZPG changed their name; I think it is now The Population Connection. I donate. There was/is also a Negative PG. Don’t know how they are doing.

    Peace[?],
    emb [compulsive copy editor]

  34. Debbe πŸ˜‰ Thanks, hon. πŸ™‚ Ironically, I myself was addressed as “hon” by three females yesterday… my pneumatic and pulchritudinous hair stylist; a hard-charging real estate property manager; and the rather, ah, mannish owner of my gym. How’s that for diversity?

    Speaking of my pneumatic and pulchritudinous hair stylist, it’s always interesting, and sometimes quite a treat, to see what she is wearing. The closest I can come to describing yesterday’s outfit is a flimsy, belted mini-toga dress. She looked quite fetching in it, but of course, when one has a tanned, trim, and toned body, I suppose one could look good in a burlap bag.

  35. JJ:

    Today’s real time strip is hilarious.

    We had an outstanding student, former grade school teacher, who came back for a Biology major and went to UM Vet School. She wrote me that some of her fellow students were MDs who decided they’d rather care for critters. 3-4 decades back; she may be retired by now.

    Peace, emb

  36. Other side of the coin: I know a DVM who became an MD and went to work in a rural health clinic in the same area. One of his first patients there was man who got a very strange look on his face when the doc walked into the exam room. “Aren’t you a veterinarian?” he asked.

  37. People on Go-Comics are talking about the “lived in” look of the DVM in the current A&J story line.
    Maybe he was patterned after Robert Redford! Have you seen any close-ups of him lately?
    Just sayin………

  38. If you don’t get enough oxygen, you suffocate or asphyxiate. If you don’t get enough food, you starve. If you’re immersed too long in water you drown. Can anyone help me find a single word that describes dying from lack of hydration?

    And regarding the Malthusian equation, what happened to the food riots in NA as predicted for the late 1970s by Paul Ehrlich in his book, The Population Bomb? The only food riots I’ve heard about were in Central America; those were tied to the diversion of corn to ethanol production here in the US. I find it passing strange that we grow so much food that we can afford to burn it in our cars.

  39. TR: Check out Brazil. If memory serves, they fuel all their vehicles with home-grown ethanol; one result is that Brazil does not concern itself with oil prices. As Brazil is less populous than the US, as well as physically larger, there is greater potential for food production there than here. [I am assuming similar fertility in parts under cultivation.]

  40. I wrote a long response / Ehrlich’s foolish prediction, but his sound basic insights, hit the wrong key, and it all disappeared. Too busy to create again, but it ended approximately thus: Some future text [if there are any] will say, “The trouble is, they didn’t do that.”

    Our grandchildren, or great grandchildren, will not thank us.

    As many of you realize, I am a liberal [but not that easily pigeon-holed], but try to be consistent. I voted for Adlai Stevenson, and have no regrets / that, but winced whenever he said/wrote, “ever-expanding economy.” That’s an ecological impossibility. None of my political liberalism is relevant here. Biology, science in general, and behavioral sciences are, and maybe theology is. Dives and Lazarus.

    Peace, emb

    Peace, emb

  41. Only seven more years until the year of the setting of “Soylent Green”, and no one has fed me any long pig. Yet. As far as I know.

  42. Ghost, some of what happened was we got a little smarter about resource conservation, and our agronomists (Borlaug, et al) worked some miracles (“green revolution”). I actually got to meet Erlich at a conference when I was in grad school…his point was, he WANTED to be “proven wrong” by humanity doing better at things. We have a long ways to go, and there are limits to what the carrying capacity of the planet is. We do not want to discover these the hard way… πŸ™‚

  43. TruckerRon, we don’t have the capacity to grow food enough to burn it in our cars. That bit of ill-advised Federal law that required a certain percentage of our annual corn crop be used for ethanol production had many negative results. Among those were the increase in the price of anything made from corn, price of livestock feed with following increase of price of livestock, and increased difficulty of the low-income families in affording food. And the ethanol damages components of the fuel systems in small gas engines such as those used in lawnmowers. If the initial plans to use other sources of fermentable materials had been followed through, most of the negative consequences would not have happened.

    Brazil’s ethanol relies mostly on sugar cane production and huge tracts of land. I don’t think the United States has enough suitable areas to grow sugar cane to make that model work here. I have seen one interesting proposal that outdated alcoholic beverages be reprocessed to produce fuel additives. That would most likely work well, with the quantities we produce.

  44. Yes, Jerry, I hope we can, too. I’m not watching — I don’t watch TV any more. I can read about it (a little) in the morning.

    And emb’s ideas on the future of the planet, I think are correct. He and I won’t be around, but for the grandchildren and later generations — hope for the best, but expect the worst.

  45. “That bit of ill-advised Federal law that required a certain percentage of our annual corn crop be used for ethanol production had many negative results. Among those were the increase in the price of anything made from corn, price of livestock feed with following increase of price of livestock, and increased difficulty of the low-income families in affording food.” All very true.

    It’s also a blatant subsidy. Corn farmers [in MN and elsewhere] love it, but I believe most corn is grown by Cargill and such, so it’s largely a subsidy to corporations.

    The irony is: ethanol LOWERS mpg. Simple chemistry [the only chem I’m capable of]: you cannot burn oxygen. Gasoline, ignoring minor additives and impurities, is hydrocarbons, all C + H. Cx + Hx + 02 yields 100% oxidized C & H, ideally CO2 and H2O. E.g., octane is C8H10.

    Ethanol is C2H5OH. Atomic wts: C=12, H=1, O=16, so 2C=24, 6H=6, O=16, total 46. By weight, ethanol is about 1/3 unburnable. MN gas pumps sometimes say, “enriched with ethanol.” Such gas is actually diluted with ethanol.

    Corporation Speak is not much different from Government Speak. Peace, emb

  46. emb. you are right. The ethanol actually makes the engine more inefficient, reducing both horsepower and mileage. So, other than reduction of oil-based components, where is the savings?

    I don’t know chemistry, but I think oxygen is flammable in high concentrations. It’s used in oxyactelene cutting/welding rigs, and home oxygen users have a no smoking sign where the oxygen is used. I have read of oxygen users who have caused flash fires due to refusal to stop smoking even when wearing an oxygen mask.

  47. Mark:

    Sorry, O2 is not itself flammable. High concentrations of O2 from the sources you mention increase the likelihood of other hot or highly oxidizable fuels catching fire. Oxygen is quite eager to fill the two vacant spaces in its outer ring with electrons, especially from atoms with only 1 or two electrons in their outer rings. You cannot leave a lump of metallic sodium [1 such electron] sitting out in a room; it will burst into flame. But it’s the sodium that’s flammable, not the O2.

    O2 is a molecule where those 2 spaces in each atom fill each other’s rings, but they’d rather accept electrons from other sources. O2 is a fairly reactive gas; if we detect significant traces of it in the atmospheres of exoplanets in the ‘Goldilocks’ zone of an moderate-sized star [and we’re close to where we can do that], there will be champagne bottles opened in astrophysicist/cosmologist labs [and I’ll have a Taddy Porter], because that will suggest something like photosynthesis going on there, replenishing its atmosphere’s O2. If photosynthesis stopped here, the free O2 in our atmosphere would gradually disappear, leaving a lot of CO2, some CO, and rust around. That’s a major reason Mars is reddish.

    Peace, emb

  48. Debbe πŸ˜‰ Here is another bonus track for those occasions when I have time to go over an hour.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VxoXn-0Ezs

    I’d been noticing a young lady at the gym for a while now, not because she’s cute and curvaceous (which she is), but because she appears to be awesomely fit. Today, I got there in time to watch her go through her entire workout routine, and I’ve decided she might possibly be the physically fittest individual I’ve ever personally known. I asked the owner about her and was told she is on summer break from the university where she getting her degree in exercise physiology. So I suppose you could say she’s at the gym doing her “homework”. If it were not so late in the summer, I’d ask her if she gives private instruction. Not because she’s cute and curvaceous, of course. Even though she is. πŸ™‚

  49. I have seen empirical samples of 15% reduction in fuel mileage with 10% Ethanol
    So there is a negative gain to start with – then there is the energy cost to produce the
    corn and then make alcohol. In the US we have to use clean burning NG.

    In Brazil they use the bagasse to make the alcohol and the temperature rarely gets to
    plus 40* so they can use higher concentrates.

    Now that subsidies are off the gas comp. buy where it is cheapest (not US).
    BP even bragged about it in one of their ads.

    GR6 Thanks for the 9:57am

    We are on “spaceship earth” when consumables are gone they are gone.
    One figure I saw was (a palindrome) that earth can support 3 Billion people indefinitely less would be better.
    A while back it was thought we (human kind) could get all our protein from the sea –
    well scratch that idea – there would be more if we ate more diverse fish verities.

    Poke me again and I will rant some more.

    Hang in there Debbe, Ian is not far – mine is 1500 miles.

  50. GR6
    cute and curvaceous, is always a bonus.

    When I heard that Apollo 1 was using pure O2 I really scratched my head –
    even as a 19 year old in the Army I had heard horror stories of high O2 environments
    going bad – and here they were sitting on top of a BIG fire.

  51. One might consider that the O atom found in ethanol means that much less atmospheric oxygen is needed for combustion. Effectively, it means that the ethanol is already a tad bit oxidized. I have never attempted to study all the variables in its usage in fuels.

    BTW, the various isomers of octane all have the formula C8H18, not C8H10. Only one isomer is best suited for gasoline usage; it formal name is 2,2,4-trimethylpentane. It is one of the octanes because there are a total of 8 C atoms (one in each methyl, plus five in the pentane chain), and solely H atoms and single bonds otherwise involved.

  52. I just deleted a wonderfully witty commentary on the debates. I’ll just give you the straight line and you provide the punch line. Eight Republicans, Rand Paul and Donald Trump walk into an auditorium in Cleveland……

  53. Good morning Villagers….

    Too much depth in some of the above postings….over my head. But leave it to GR πŸ˜‰ to bring it back to curves and curls πŸ™‚

    I’m like Miss Charlotte….if I watch TV, it needs to be a movie. The only debate I faced last night was do I want to sit through an episode of “Naked and Afraid” (my husband and BIL l believe live for Thursday nights) or go to bed….I went to bed…at 8ish and wide awake at 3ish.

    Work was horrible yesterday…the humidity was terrible, and with a hen house full of dust and crap, my eggs looked nasty. Read an article yesterday morning on the Avian flu and the Eastern Migratory Flyway…can’t remember the name of the swans, but they are on their way to their winter grounds flying over Penn. The poultry industry is starting to ready itself for the fall season of migration and another round of viral infections affecting the industry. You might start saving your money for that Thanksgiving turkey.

    Indy Mindy??????

    ya’ll have a blessed day

    Oh, and the name of that movie with Mel Gibson and Piper Laurie….”Tim”

  54. Regarding outdated alcohol, a local establishment gave Ian a going away present last week. A case of outdated Budweiser bottles….they couldn’t sell it since it was outdated. Tasted good to me πŸ™‚ There actually is a “birthdate” posted on the cases…..and it says “birthdate” and gives the date….

  55. emb, thanks for the explanation. I proved I really didn’t know chemistry, didn’t I? Everybody have a great and safe Friday.

  56. I’ve not read any of today’s posts, and am not trying to compete with Debbe. But type this into your browser, skip the ads, click on the site, read what you like, and enlarge the photo of the beagle.

    Peace, emb

  57. “BTW, the various isomers of octane all have the formula C8H18, not C8H10.” Embarrassing: I envisioned the easiest structural formula, and forgot the 8 oxygens on the other side. Mea culpa. emb

  58. To our fearless leader, JJ,

    A belated “Thanks” for the kind treatment of a fellow veterinarian in your daily strip. Surely he must be a graduate of the Auburn College of Veterinary Medicine. There are many of us old retired large animal vets out in the world and we all thank you.

    Blessings and prayers for all who need them and we all need them,sometime.

  59. Debbe πŸ˜‰ Thanks for the tune, hon. It’s a keeper. And have a Happy and Blissful Payday today. But beware tomorrow…it’s National Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your Neighbor’s Porch Day.

    Yeah, I look at the ladies. Why not? I’m not depressed (usually), nor old (by choice, anyway), and I’m sure not dead. πŸ˜‰ BTW, that show should actually be called “Pixilated and Afraid”. (OK, I checked it out. So sue me. πŸ™‚ )

  60. Whoops, left something out.

    I’ve not read any of today’s posts, and am not trying to compete with Debbe. But type this into your browser, skip the ads, click on the site, read what you like, and enlarge the photo of the beagle.

    A.Word.A.Day–exungulate

    Peace, emb

  61. Also, re today’s realtime, I don’t think he’s creepy. Maybe Janis thinks he’s “good creepy.” We’re all kinda strange.

    Peace, emb

Comments are closed.