Character Flaw


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I intended to be here yesterday, and I would have but for technical issues. I still prefer a desktop computer for my work. It seems to me much more suited to the graphic manipulation that is much of my effort. However, the old Dell I’d been using was about 150 years old in computer years. Loading modern Web sites was excruciatingly slow and increasingly futile, and it simply was not powerful enough to run updated versions of some of the software upon which I rely. Worst of all, I couldn’t stream HD movies to run in the background while I worked! So, I purchased a new computer, the latest incarnation of the first computer I purchased back in 1994. I love it. However, the migration has not been easy, particularly getting my scanner to work properly. That’s what I was working on yesterday about this time. For now, it’s working, but it was working once before—perfectly—then my scanner vanished from my new computer’s “friends” list. So we shall see. For now, here’s Vince. We’ll talk more about him and the cartoons next time.

291 thoughts on “Character Flaw”

  1. Ghost and Jackie, I looked at 9CL, and when you enlarge the strip the copyright date shows 2008.

    Debbe, I’ve been reading but not saying too much. Haven’t bought the album yet because I was looking for the deluxe version with the Blu-ray disc. Wanted to buy locally but guess I will have to go on expedition up the Amazon to find it. By the way, I have listened to the album, since Spotify made it available in its entirety on the 10th. Who cares if Taylor Swift pulled her stuff off it. Never listened to anything she recorded anyway. Her loss is our gain.

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  2. Thanks, Mark. That’s about what I figured, as I think it was about 2007 when Juliette decided she was being sexually harassed by the board of trustees (despite being empowered by secretly wearing uber-sexy leopard skin-pattern lingerie under her prim and proper business attire) and bought the farm, so to speak.

    I took off today to meet with my Mom’s home health RN. (As good an excuse as any, I suppose). So I may make up some bacon marm, too, Ruth Anne. I probably shouldn’t admit this, but the recent “sex is icky” remarks here didn’t bother me quite as much as the “bacon is icky” ones. šŸ˜‰

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  3. Mark, looks like Taylor Swift will never ever be getting back together with Spotify.

    Good of her to try to encourage struggling recording artists to also pull the plug on Spotify, even if it means them giving up revenue. Of course, it’s obviously easier to take principled stands when one is mega-rich from selling songs to teenage girls.

    Her music is for an audience that is not me.

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  4. Ghost: “. . . the recent ā€œsex is ickyā€ remarks here didnā€™t bother me quite as much as the ā€œbacon is ickyā€ ones.”

    Bacon is not icky, especially crisp bacon. Just contains > fat grams > I can handle without severely restricting what else I eat. Reminds me, I slept in this morning, and my large bowl of hot cereal + black seedless awaits me in the microwave. Back this afternoon or so. emb

    P.S. Sex isn’t icky, it’s theoretical.

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  5. GR6, musicians may have a gripe with Spotify. The real problem is over the air radio went to talk shows and internet services did not buy the old music distribution model.

    Neal, information on life of computing devices should not be made public; we have an economy to protect. šŸ˜‰

    GR6, I had coffee this morning with a former MIG 17 pilot, what stories.

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  6. Hey, Steve, don’t knock WordPerfect. That’s what we have at work, as the company is too cheap, ah, expense-conscious to buy as many Word licenses as would be required for all of us. (I have MS Office on my office desktop. Don’t ask how.)

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  7. I understand Spotify pays the artist very little per play, but from the point of view of a consumer (like me), listening to just about anything I care to hear for ~ $10 per month is a heck of a deal. Helps make up for all those $20 CD’s I bought over the years just to listen to a couple of tunes on each of them. šŸ™‚ And I suspect the potential audience on Spotify does (or will soon) dwarf that of most other media forms.

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  8. If you can’t eat regular bacon, emb, try beef bacon. Just like with the regular kind, you have to pick and choose to get a package without too much fat, but once you do, it’s much leaner than the best bacon. Not quite the same taste or texture, of course, but it’s pretty good.

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  9. Yes, the same feeling is coming over me as did when I first read this series Back In The Day. Without going into great detail, it can be summarized as “Danger, danger, Will Robinson!” (with appropriate arm flailing.)

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  10. GR6 said: ā€œpromiscuous virgin.ā€
    Urban dictionary would likely define as follows; fifteen year old with a smartphone in a bathroom equipped with a full length mirror.

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  11. The price per play may be small, but considering that unlike radio, you can pick exactly what you want to hear, the large crowd of fans should provide a lot of plays and a lot of money. After all, streaming music has not killed CD sales, they were already in the toilet due to ever-increasing prices combined with low quality performers. Some of what I listen to on Spotify I would not buy as a CD, but if I listen to the Spotify radio setting i might hear something I would not have listened to, either, and find that I like it.

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  12. Thanks for the bacon recipe Ghost. I highlighted it, went to print it and 21 pages of comments began to print instead, including all the archival lists from A and J. That is 3 more than the last time I tried to print it!

    Saying icky about bacon to a Southerner is totally treasonous in my opinion. Two things will improve anything, bacon and chocolate. In fact, we had a restaurant when I lived in Houston that became famous for batter frying crisp bacon like chicken fried steak. Unfortunately, Mike never would go eat there so I didn’t try chicken fried bacon.

    Stopped at Mom’s favorite bar-b-que/catfish restaurant in Muskogee (Okie From Muskogee) and had homemade banana pudding and got phone number and info from the tabletop business cards of premier trainer for guns and defense, including top woman shooter in Oklahoma as women’s defense course.

    I knew that would be on new tabletops! Right place to go, we have been a customer since day he opened. Great food and love the staff.

    Love, Jackie

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  13. My favorite appetizer in world are mustard green bite sized pies.

    Really simple, fry a lb. of bacon, drain off most of grease, add one chopped onion to caramelize and then add a big handful of chiffoniered mustard greens, a bunch about as big as you can get your hands around. Do not add water. If liquid forms, drain it off. Coarse pepper and salt if needed.

    Use the bacon=greens to stuff small rounds of butter pastry for a pie crust. Cut the rounds with small circle cutter, then fold over and close, use fork to press sides together. Bake until golden crust and crisp.

    I’d be more exact but I got this verbally from the cook who did appetizers for my wedding and I never wrote it down! Just kept making them. I used to make about 2-3 hundred and freeze for a big party, they got slurped down fast.

    Last time I saw lardoons used it was for making slits in meat and putting slivers of fat into the holes! So, lardoons of bacon.

    Love, Jackie

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  14. Jackie, make sure you click on “Selected” after you highlight the recipe and before you print it. Or try highlighting the recipe; then cut and paste it to a work processor (whatever you’ve got on your computer); then print it from the word processor.

    Sounds like a great choice for an instructor. Females have some unique challenges in firearms use, not the least of which is hand size, and that a holster that will fit the waist-hip area of a male perfectly…not so much for a female. (Curves, you know.) I’d be anxious to know if she has any recommendations for a choice of firearms for you. (Whether they agree with mine or not.)

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  15. A small yellow flag went up yesterday when Vince invited Janis for coffee. A medium-sized red flag when up when he made that remark in panel 4 today.

    Watch him Janis.

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  16. Decided not to go get my hair and nails done before the onslaught of rain, ice and snow they are predicting for us here. I know, bad choice!

    Sat here and read blogs on comics about 9 CL plots. I know there are people who professionally write about the comics, so I anticipated getting an explanation of sudden disappearance of plot. No such thing.

    I had even thought it might be linked to Veterans’ Day and syndicates receiving complaints about strip. But that was stretching it, really. Complaints about slowly boring us all to death maybe?

    Read an article that said it was most popular strip in America. Really? Then why can’t I find a single line mentioning the abrupt change of plot, time and characters?

    Time for a nap now!

    Love, Jackie

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  17. Dear Jackie, I looked for Chickweed Lane on the site “Comics I Don’t Understand” (this morning) — you can Google this or type it into the address bar. There was some kind of explanation there but it didn’t make much sense to me. I haven’t been following the strip recently; just reading the comments here.
    For a REALLY hard to follow story line, read Jane’s World by Paige Braddock; it’s on GoComics.com with most of the Villagers’ favorites. I looked her up … I guess it’s in re-runs … but Jane is so endearing, and the drawing is SO GOOD without any unnecessary flourishes, I love it. And the characters have real facial expressions. Brooke’s characters look like cute paper dolls that are moved around here and there to show the action of the strip.
    For Ghost, and Jackie, I’ve read of lardoons in cookbooks but never seen real ones. How big are they really? (or, how small?)
    And dearest Ghost, please don’t cook bacon over high heat; not only will the bacon burn, but the bacon fat will be no good either. Use a nice moderate, or even lower, heat. Is your stove electric, or gas? My stove is electric.

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  18. He had to crowdfund his stage play? One would think the creator of “the most popular strip in America” could obtain funding for his creative work through normal channels, wouldn’t one?

    Someone as purportedly brilliant as McEldowney should know that the old expression about having “too many irons in the fire” comes from blacksmithing days, meaning that if a smith put too many pieces of horseshoe iron in his furnace at once, none of them came out too hot. Perhaps we are observing the wordsmithing counterpart of that.

    And Miz Charlotte, you are of course correct…the first rule of cooking bacon is “Don’t Burn the Bacon!” šŸ™‚

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  19. It IS interesting to read some other bloggers, like Comics I Don’t Understand, although it doesn’t look like that many people do write about newspaper comic strips. I found it interesting that CIDU eliminated 9 CL from winning the Arlo award, as they said it had long ago become soft porn and was disqualified. The other one that declared it had become a soap opera strip like Mary Worth was interesting too.

    I happen to agree with both.

    Looked around and 10# dog was perched in a flat of pansies I put in office to try to keep them from freezing, over and over and over.

    Now, about best comic strip in America, not that I am prejudiced, but I think JJ deserves that title for Arlo and Janis. His art is consistently good, extremely well animated and full of great, subtle expression. His humor is equally sophisticated and often subtle, therefore I think it passes over a lot of people’s heads.

    Not to get me started but I do think so many strips are poorly/not drawn at all, almost doodling. I was reading some back strips on Calvin and Hobbes today and there is one with a forest that is truly breathtakingly drawn, no color, just woods and forest. I have realized this year that most of the strips I enjoy are old, often in reruns. It is not because I am old myself, I like to think my mind is still open and receptive, I think it is because I appreciate comic art, both in drawing and humor.

    Another ranting idiot here!

    Love, Jackie

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  20. I found a total of one article online ref McEldowney’s “Many Mansions” play, indicating he began working on it over 30 years ago. (A vanity production, perhaps?) The play’s FB page said, as of about a week ago, the crowdfunding drive had only raised about 35% (or < $3000) of the $8500 they said they needed to stage it. 9CL is suddenly in reruns, and Pibgorn is basically him writing puff pieces about individual panels of his previous work there. "Too many irons in the fire" still seems to me to be an operative conjecture.

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  21. I haven’t looked recently but one of my friends crowd funded his first book, a humor book on sailing and adventures in a $300 boat. I think he raised MORE money than he needed and did it in a couple of weeks. Granted he does write for two national boating magazines and a large online magazine but he didn’t advertise there for money.

    Seems that a major national comic writer/artist with all the books he has published wouldn’t have had trouble unless the play really is horrible. My friend raised way more than $8500 to publish his book.

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  22. Regarding 9CL – When JJ goes on vacation, Arlo and Janis tend to go into reruns too.
    I figure Martine and WWII will be back next week. While I would prefer a slightly quicker pace in the current arc (season? era? saga?), I don’t put too much into it: 9CL is the daily comic equivalent of an avant-garde summer blockbuster – big on visuals, short on plot development. IF, the current day’s strip relates to the day before, cool. If not, I just roll with it. My current two favorite characters are Danny, the orange and white cat, and Juno, the kitten.

    Our fearless leader is a minimalist independent film superstar (in keeping with the current analogy). I remember this retro arc well. Didn’t it run relatively soon after Arlo’s own office spouse made her appearance?

    Fourteen hours and back at it again at 5am. Night!

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  23. Mindy, I worry about YOU and the hours and hours. Ralph, my loyal dirt mover is working on getting the truck load out of my drive way and into the rock walled areas, plus does what you do. He worked here until 1 today and then went to work 12 hours at the convenience store.

    Next time any of us are in a convenience store we should think of this and be extra nice to the clerk(s) waiting on us. They deserve some appreciation and thanks, in my opinion.

    Good night, love, Jackie

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  24. I will take your advice, Jackie, I really will. I try to be nice to store clerks all the time, and sometimes I am humbled because they are always so nice to me.

    Dearest Ghost, I won’t be able to sleep tonight unless you tell me the right size for a lardoon. I’m also bothered by not knowing where Skeezix got those 300 boxes of macaroni and cheese.

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  25. A friend used to have an employee who claimed her semi-wandering boyfriend had a thing for “curb store girls”. First and only time I ever heard of that.

    Many years ago, before I kicked the evil tobacco habit, I often stopped at various stores on the way home at night to buy cigarettes, and I got acquainted with the night shift employees at several stores. Without exception, they seemed to be really nice people.

    Today, I would simply not walk into one of those stores after dark, despite the fact I am always armed and always maintain a high level of awareness of my surroundings. Yet almost all store employees are prohibited by their companies from carrying. They are braver than I am.

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  26. Charlotte, lardoons or lardons (either is correct) are technically cuts of pork belly, fatback, bacon or salt pork that are sliced into small strips or cubes about one centimeter (0.4 inch) wide and used to “lard” or flavor other cuts of meat. In the bacon marm recipe, I would read it as “cut the slices of bacon into half inch pieces”. (I think perhaps the writer of the recipe may have been “showing off” a bit.)

    Sleep tight. šŸ™‚

    I’ll be working on the mac and cheese question.

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  27. Mindy from Indy, your description of your work as a manager at the convenience store reminds me of my time as a “site supervisor” for a regional security company. Lots of responsibility, little authority, upper management hired mostly anybody who was breathing. If they didn’t show up or did their job poorly there were hardly any consequences for them, but plenty for me. The last straw was one Halloween when I went in at 5am for my shift and did not get relieved till the 3rd shift guard arrived around midnight. When I called the roving supervisor who was supposed to take the shift when no one else could be found to relieve me on the second shift, he refused to come and claimed he didn’t have his uniform with him on duty in the security company’s main office. Last day I worked for that company.

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  28. Charlotte, that is an awful lot of mac and cheese. The only explanation I could offer is that Skeezix is one of those people who just cannot turn down a “bargain” and that he bought it from some guy selling it out if the trunk of a car parked in an alley. Now he is trying to donate all the “hot meals” he purchased.

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  29. Mike just woke me on intercom with cries for help. I thought he’d fallen again and I was fearing having to lift him. But it wasn’t a fall, so he is back in bed. Now I am awake and it can’t be too late, but I am going to have trouble getting back asleep.. Caregivers should be like Ghost, taller, more fit and athletic than I certainly am.

    Forgot to answer the lardoons question but Ghost did admirably. I didn’t suspect Ghost was showing off his literacy but someone was, that is why I said I hadn’t seen that one in a long time. I used to be a big fan of Julia Child and Craig Claiborne, similar cooks and you can learn an awful lot by reading people like that. I used to read cookbooks for entertainment, like others read novels. Now I never cook much at all it seems.

    I always favored fat back for lardoons as they are firmer and stiffer than bacon and bacon is danged hard to poke in a tiny slit.
    It is same way you make slits to poke slivers of garlic into meats and about the same size.

    The other day I described trying to poke a set of boat sails and masts into a long, skinny sail bag as trying to push a stick down a python like bag. I would describe lardoons as graphically but it wouldn’t be suitable for polite company!

    Better if the lardoons are frozen, actually, makes them harder and more easily inserted.

    Different cooking subject, I think I will use my favorite turkey baking method and loosen all the skin on bird and pack it with herbed butter between skin and flesh. Since the freeze froze all my herbs, they won’t be mine!

    If there is another in the cooking trinity that will improve anything, it is butter. Used to cook a lot of dishes that began, “Soften/melt one stick of butter” and went on to add more!

    Love, Jackie

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  30. I definitely have fallen off the butter wagon the past two days. As I confessed last night, the beer bread smelled so good right out of the oven that I just had to have a piece of it with a (small) pat of butter on it.

    Then this morning, when I used the beer bread to make French toast, I figured in for a penny, in for a pound, and pan fried it in butter.

    Then this afternoon, my Mom said some corn bread surely would be good with the ham and bean soup I’d made her to have for dinner, so I drug out one of my larger cast iron skillets and the Shawnee Pride yellow cornmeal mix, and voilĆ …cornbread to carry over to her apartment. So of course, I had to save a couple of slices of it to have later with my dinner…with another small pat of butter on it.

    And if you’re wondering, yeah, the diet is shot to hell for the past two days.

    Oh well, I’ll be good again until at least Christmas.

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  31. Grocery had all the Shawnee mixes at 2/88 cents, so I stocked up yesterday in Tulsa. The whole-wheat pancake mix is good too, as are the bran muffin mixes. But not 2/88 good!

    The butter mixed with olive oil is pretty good too and more “good fat” I suppose.

    If I can remember the case of apples I will make some for mom’s pancakes. I need to bring some into kitchen so they are visible.
    And Yes, I sautƩ them in butter!

    Love, Jackie

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  32. It’s always pleasant to daydream about cooking. Thanks to Ghost and to Jackie for the appetizing techniques of larding, and I see what you mean about the difficulty. Bacon, raw, is so limp! Salt pork, which I used to use to make chowder, is nice and firm; and freezing makes foods easier to handle.
    Ghost, you’ve solved the mystery of Skeezix and the macaroni and cheese — I’m sure that’s the answer. Another mystery is how Skeezix keeps so healthy and active, at his age! But of course comic strip time is different from real time.
    Yes, butter is good, but now that we’re older, best stay away from it.
    I used to go to convenience stores, seems like a lifetime ago, for the evil tobacco habit and, the lottery ticket habit too — I’m glad I was able to give them both up. Now I don’t even leave the house in the evening any more.

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  33. Actually Gasoline Alley is one of the few “real time” comic strips. From Wikipedia:

    Gasoline Alley is a comic strip created by Frank King and currently distributed by Tribune Media Services. First published November 24, 1918, it is the second longest running comic strip in the US (after The Katzenjammer Kids) and has received critical accolades for its influential innovations.[1] In addition to inventive color and page design concepts, King introduced real-time continuity to comic strips by showing his characters as they grew to maturity and aged over generations.[2]

    The few “timeless” characters who don’t age are: Joel, Rufus, Magnus, and Melba.

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  34. Actually, I did pan fry this morning’s French toast in half butter, half olive oil. Makes me feel a little better about myself. But boy, was that French toast ever good!

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  35. Good morning Villagers…..

    Wahhh….I don’t wanna go to work….it’s cold out there, 17 degrees! First thing I do when I get to work is check the temp in the hen house, walk over and turn the heat on, pick up my boots, hold them up to the heat flow and warm them up. It takes about two hours to warm the packing room up to 60 degrees. The Boss wants it turned down past 40 degrees at night…tightwad. I’ll be wearing my long johns under my jeans today.

    I love my local convenience store….it’s about 2 miles from work. The manager and the afternoon young lady are very pleasant. We’re on first name basis. The afternoon girl calls me ‘Beautiful’, and I call her Sunshine.

    My missing cat has been found. She goes out and comes in, so she’s an innie and outie. She had been missing the past four days. My husband was picking up the mess around the entrance to under the house, and he heard a ‘meow’. Opened the door, and there was Hampton (yes, that’s where I worked…as a head housekeeper, and where I rescued her from…the name seemed appropriate) She is a slate grey, long haired female with the most beautiful green eyes. All I could do last night was hold her to my chest with my housecoat wrapped around her…and she laid like that for at least an hour….until my white cat got jealous.

    I don’t cook much, so I don’t have any recipes to share, but I enjoy reading them…the bacon marm does sound good. Maybe I’ll get my husband to try it….he has been cooking since he’s ‘retired’…..lucky me šŸ™‚

    And I do love the artwork in ‘Calvin’

    Happy Caterday……

    GR šŸ˜‰

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  36. Oohh, today starts deer hunting season…and there’s trucks and headlights all up and down the gravel road…now…but, yesterday, Dakota (my weekend help) came by to pick up his check. He asked if I wanted to fire his rifle….I said no, but curiosity got to me. I went outside to check out the gun….seems it was manufactured in France in the late 30’s and was used by the French in WW11… I don’t know what kind of wood was used but it was well crafted….I held it up, scoped it, but did not fire it as I knew it had a kick to it and they would be picking me up off the ground…..the rifle weighed 8.2 pounds. Thank you for letting me share this with you all……

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  37. Computer migration is cycle of our current environment, like ploughing and harvesting were in, say, 6000 BC. I spent nearly 40 years creating this stuff, and there’s always a hitch when something new goes in. I prefer a desktop, too, because that’s what I’m used to, but I am also used to a mainframe, and all systems are as grass, which today flourishes and tomorrow is thrown into the oven. At least all these systems are starting to get a little maturity.

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  38. Good morning village. 43Ā° down here on the southside, must mean you’ll up north are having winter.

    Crab wrote: “At least all these systems are starting to get a little maturity.” Lot more transistors and cheap memory just leads to sloppy code. Kinda like people as we age, senility is merely over stuffed file cabinets.

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  39. OK, quick! What’s the “name” of the winter storm currently moving across the Mid-West?
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    That’s what I thought. The Weather Channel’s practice of naming winter storms just gets sillier and sillier, doesn’t it?

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  40. Funny there should be the mention of bacon-onion jam. The other day I was reading the description of a “super bacon cheeseburger”-two bacon-wrapped patties with various cheeses, tomato, lettuce, and Dr Pepper/bacon/onion jam. The rest of the burger sort of made my arteries harden as I read about it, but the Dr Pepper jam sounds interesting. I can’t find a recipe, though.

    Once upon a time I read Pibgorn, but gave up on it as it just never seemed to go anywhere, and I got bored. Now the same thing is happening with 9CL. In recent weeks I had forgotten what the plot line was, and why Bill and Martine were wandering around in the woods. I also tend to agree with Jackie, and have thought for a very long time, that 9CL isn’t so much a comic as an exercise in how much soft-core porn McEldowney can get away with, which makes the plot of his play so ironic. For those who haven’t followed links, it’s about a “young atheist who one day finds herself at the center of a most unconventional religious experience”. I’m about to give up on Juliette, Edda, et al, because I’m to the point where I don’t really care what happens to them, and McEldowney’s people are about as realistic as a Barbie doll.

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  41. Debbe, I’m glad your cat is safe! There are 4 or 5 sort of feral cats who hang out in my back yard, and I make sure they have a warm, safe place to sleep and food for when hunting is scarce, and if one of them doesn’t turn up for a day I do worry.

    For those keeping score of such things, the temp this morning was 27F, and the water in the cat’s bowl was frozen.

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  42. My last red heeler who died within year was named “Love” for the truck stop where I rescued her (and the 7 puppies we didn’t know she was pregnant with) It seemed an appropriate name, she was a most loving dog and when all the other heelers had died, she got to finally be my faithful companion, as she had wanted to all those years. I wish it had been for longer.

    I also had “Sam” who was a female red heeler I rescued from a Walmart parking lot she had been left in. She was named for Sam Walton actually, not Sam’s Club.

    About heelers, they seem to not like each other or so mine seemed. They also want to be the dominant dog and “you belong to them” in their minds. They don’t like anyone else interfering with their humans.

    Within the pack of puppies there was one blue and six red heelers and the red ones picked on the blue so badly I had to move her into house to live with me.

    Am I the only one who thinks dogs and cats are NOT color blind?

    This does seem odd. Right now I have my mom’s old, like REALLY old, Australian shepherd with no hair and my Catahoula Curr female who is a tri-color like a blue heeler. Those two go at each other like wild cats! I have to take them out separately and not let them see each other through windows. Housekeeper took down the sheets I’d hung over windows for that reason and I almost lost a window again just now!

    Feral mama cat is outside my window eating breakfast with Russian blue kitten. And the apricot one just appeared. Last night I looked out and a young possum had his nose stuck thru the grill work of shelf and was sucking up cat kibble! Then he turned the bowl over,solving that mystery of the cat bowl on its’ side every morning.

    You guys, talking computers like that! I know you probably speak Russian too!

    Love, Jackie

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  43. “. . . itā€™s cold out there, 17 degrees!” Low here of +2F, temp. now 5F, expected high 20F. Mostly sunny, but probably not enough to melt the 2-3″ on the ground. One can hope. Cold enough so roads will mostly not be slippery. Happy November.

    Today’s newspaper comic is right on. We never had a fixed intercom in the bathroom, but that kind of treatment on both of our parts was usual, whatever we were wearing or not. Gratitude. Peace, emb

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  44. “. . . an exercise in how much soft-core porn McEldowney can get away with, which makes the plot of his play so ironic.” Be careful, we don’t want JJ to be accused of “as much naughty innuendo as he can get away with.” He cannot be accused of graphic porn, though I think there was once a dot on a distant mermaid.

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  45. Back to the bacon jam/marmalade. I knew there was an old Southern recipe for Dr. Pepper jelly, which I found on net, but I have never made. I also knew there were recipes for tomato jellies and jams, which I used to make, and some of the bacon jams also use tomatoes with the onions. Some of the bacon jams also use bourbon or whiskey in them and I would suspect that there are still those who will not cook with alcohol but will cook with soft drinks.

    That is how you ended up with Coca Cola and other soft drinks in a lot of recipes back when I was a kid/younger as the South was full of non-drinking non-cooking with alcohol Christians, like my grandmother.

    There are a lot of Southern ham glazes that use soft drinks, like Coke or Dr. Pepper, and I even found one that used brown sugar, bacon and onions and sounded a lot like the bacon jam/marmalade mix but it had Dr. Pepper in it!

    Today’s younger restaurant cooks/chefs are not cooking the older, traditional “French” or European dishes that were around in the 1960-80’s in upscale restaurants. They are experimenting with lots of things and actually revising and using things their great grandparents might have cooked with farm ingredients.

    Come on JJ, back to Gene and Mary Lou and Gus and the new restaurant or bistro or whatever. And have them serve bacon jam on brie cheese and toast as a homage to Ghost.

    Love, Jackie

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  46. Jackie, there are also cakes which use various soft drinks. Had a very good Coca-Cola ™ chocolate cake at an old-time cafe in Franklin, TN.

    Here is a Dr. Pepper jelly recipe I found with internet search: http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/sauce-spread/jam/dr-pepper-jelly.html

    It’s probably the same one you saw, Jackie. Wonder how it would be with Buffalo Rock Ginger Ale. Bet that would make a good ham glaze! That drink is not too sweet and has a ginger punch like British ginger beer.

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  47. I loved Franklin, TN. When next to last company hired Mike they told us we were going to Tennessee, so I got ready to move to Franklin, my choice of great Southern town. Sent out about 1000 letters to all our customers we had saying how much we would miss them, we were moving to Tennessee. Company fired salesman from Texas-Oklahoma and called us saying forget TN, so I had to send out letters saying “Sorry, we are staying after all!”

    There was an awesome cafƩ there I loved but it has been 20 years now, so of course I forget the name. But I am from the town in Louisiana that is home to the original Coca Cola bottling and candy company, so they cook a LOT of things there with Coke. Hams and cakes being two, of course.

    I am mildly defeated, I have been trying to find restaurants in Tulsa area that serve oysters, especially po’ boys, for Mike as he has to do radiation daily now and is starting chemo we assume next week as well. I did find one, S and J Oysters which we used to eat in when we moved here, it shut down, has reopened in an abridged form. And can’t find another one of any kind except a couple of raw appetizers and he doesn’t do raw now.

    None of the “sea food” restaurants have oysters and there aren’t too many when they list Captain D’s and Popeyes as seafood choices in top restaurants in Tulsa! Not that I wouldn’t eat at either one, I am no snob, but I need one with oysters.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  48. Jackie: “Am I the only one who thinks dogs and cats are NOT color blind?” No, and biologists agree with you. Dogs and cats, like most mammals, are dichromats. They have two kinds of cones [color-sensitive cells] in their retinas. Present day primates, including us, generally have three. Tens of millions of years ago, a genetic mutation occurred in an ancestral primate, duplicating a site on the X-chromosome that contained a gene for a protein that is most sensitive to light at the red and green end of the spectrum. Dogs and cats and the rest have just one gene at that position, are therefore unable to distinguish red from green; they are red-green colorblind. In the lineages leading to present day primates, one of those red-green sites duplicated. Then one of those two mutated, making it more sensitive to red or green than the other one, so we can distinguish red from green.

    Other mutations, of course, can destroy their color sensitivity, but these are recessive. Some of us, females, have two X-chromosomes, so can still distinguish red from green if there is a normal gene on their other X-chromosome. Others of us, males, have only one X, so will be red-green colorblind if we get a color-defective X from mom. We get a tiny Y-chromosome from dad, which is what makes us male, but has no color-sensitive site. Therefore, red-green colorblindness is much rarer in women, because that will only happen if they get defective red-green genes from both folks. There will be a quiz next time.

    [No, but if I can find it and it’s not too long, I may post an excerpt from a column I wrote about an instance of this that came up during a lecture in Intro Biology.]

    Peace, emb

    Reply
  49. My husband, Mike is color blind, my daughter’s husband is color blind. Will my grandson Jack also be color blind? Or will it depend on what type color blindness each male has?

    Reply
  50. [“Hey, emb, there’s no school Saturday.” OK, don’t read this until Monday.]
    Three nuggets from high school or college biology. One: Many genes come in alternate forms, called alleles. Sometimes one allele is “dominant” to another; if so, the other is “recessive”. (E.g., the allele for blue eyes is recessive to several alleles for other eye colors.)
    Two: Women normally have 22 pairs of ordinary chromosomes (“autosomes”) and two X-chromosomes, total 46. Men normally have 22 pairs of autosomes, one X-chromosome, and one Y-chromosome, total 46. When humans make egg or sperm cells, chromosome pairs separate. A woman’s normal eggs therefore have 22 autosomes and one X-chromosome. Half of a man’s normal sperm have 22 autosomes and one X-chromosome; the other half have 22 autosomes and one Y-chromosome.
    Three: Dad thus determines a normal embryo’s sex. If an X-bearing sperm fertilizes an egg, that plus Mom’s X will produce XX, a girl. If a Y-bearing sperm fertilizes an egg, that plus Mom’s X will produce XY, a boy.
    Autosomes range in number of genes from relatively high to relatively low. X-chromosomes are large, and carry lots of genes. Y-chromosomes are small, carrying few genes. X-Y sex determination results in “X-linked” inheritance. The traits controlled by X-linked genes need not relate directly to sex, but their inheritance depends on whether you inherited one X-chromosome or two.
    A simple example, red-green color vision, works well in large biology lectures. You ask for a show of hands of all men who know they are red-green colorblind. About 5 to 8 % of the men will raise a hand. (Note: ā€who know they are red-green colorblind”. Red-green colorblind people see colors; they have two of the three kinds of color-sensitive cone cells in their retinas. They cannot distinguish some reds from some greens, but they have no way of knowing that until they are tested in an eye exam.)
    Then you get a show of hands of all women who know they are red-green colorblind. Rarely does a hand go up; most women who inherit a colorblindness gene from Dad get a normal gene from Mom, and red-green colorblindness is recessive.
    One spring, a young woman’s hand went up in the second row. It was “Edna” and I said, ” ‘Opal’ must be a carrier”. (Opal is Edna’s mother.) But how did this weird prof know that Opal was not herself red-green colorblind, and thus have to pass colorblindness to all her daughters? I knew the family. Edna was the middle of three sisters, each of whom took my course. “Mabel”, the eldest had sat down front a year or two earlier, and not raised her hand. So Mabel was not colorblind. Therefore, Opal must have both alleles, one on each of her X-chromosomes. Opal could distinguish red from green, but was a carrier for the recessive allele, which Edna got.
    Edna, of course, had gotten a colorblindness gene from “Edward”, a fellow biology prof. Edward, having only one X-chromosome and a colorblind daughter, was therefore colorblind. Later, the youngest daughter, “Ethel”, also sat down front, and did not raise her hand. In addition to helping me demonstrate X-linked inheritance, the three also confirmed a common phenomenon: “A-students sit down front”.

    Possible multiple choice question: If either Mabel or Ethel bear a son who can see, what is the probability that he will be red-green colorblind? a. 0 b. 25% c. 50% d. 100% e. Cannot tell, because we don’t know if his father could tell red from green.

    Reply
  51. GR6, an even bigger red flag came when Janis accepted, without reservation, the snarky depiction of Arlo being made by another man.

    A&J was already in 1993 the best comic strip in our newspaper by a wide margin, and I really, really enjoyed it. When I saw this strip, I muttered some expletives and was certain we were now in A Very Special Episode of Arlo and Janis.

    I was quite exercised and not optimistic for a second as to How This Would All Pan Out. Thank God that Our Bard was made of sterner stuff than I had assessed him of at that particular time. I hope Our Bard does not find my lack of faith (at that moment) disturbing.

    Reply
  52. Well, I for ONE do not like the looks of this office “boy” who looks about as old as Gene as a teenager. I know, I know, Janis was younger then as well, but he just looks immature! And not to be trusted either. OK, I know this ends well but I haven’t seen it I think?

    Reply
  53. Jackie, I couldn’t remember the name either so I looked it up. It was Dotson’s and I think it has been in the same family since the 1940’s or ’50’s.

    Have a look at this site: http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g51697-d407824-Reviews-White_River_Fish_Market-Tulsa_Oklahoma.html

    If you look under the address at the upper left you;ll see the word menu in blue. Click it and you can see what they have. I see both oyster poor boys and fried oysters.

    Reply
  54. Thanks Mark. I am going to drive Mike to both places and we will try them out. His arm is hurting so we will have to drive him now, they are doing radiation from three directions but it is the tumor in spine causing the pain. And he is on pain medications which aren’t legal to drive with. Daughter will be here this week, then I take back over.

    While I was looking for a pot roast slow cooker recipe, guess what I found? Coca Cola Pot Roast! I had forgotten that one too. All this dates back a least to the 1950’s I suspect, as I remember that one as a kid.

    I also remember a jellied salad made with cola and Jello powder?

    All our “old family recipes” seem to have originated on the back of the products’ cans.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  55. Jackie, actually that would be “Lard confiture sur le fromage de brie et de pain grillĆ© de le FantĆ“me”, and it might indeed make an excellent appetizer at the bistro. Besides being “Frenchified” enough to suit ML.

    Reply
  56. You’re welcome, sand. I actually saw an ad for what would have to be (to me) the most worthless possible accessory for a GLOCK pistol…a bayonet. Unless perhaps I were a pirate needing to forcibly board one sailing ship from another sailing ship.

    Of course, if bayoneted pistols catch on out on the mean streets, it will likely do away with the habit of robbers thrusting their pistols into the front waistbands of their trousers. Or at least decrease the probability of armed robbers who do that having baby armed robbers.

    What do you call a pirate’s vacation?

    Arrr & Arrr!

    Reply
  57. Seems GR6 and Evan are up to some stange behavior. They are going to consume toast slathered in bacon grease, then go to the head office to hit some guy with a cheese. Seigneur, ayez pitiĆ© de ces Ć¢mes pĆ©cheresses.

    Reply
  58. GR6, heh. Well played, sir, well played.

    I meet every Thursday morning with a group that includes a gentleman that taught both French and Spanish at West Point, and was often used as a translator during his military career. One morning he made some offhand comment in French, I made some quip back in French to his surprise, and now we have a brief chat every week.

    One of our running jokes is that since we are the only two people that know what we are saying, either of us can claim that the other said something silly, scandalous or any point in between and there is no defense to that.

    Clearly you have made this gentleman’s acquaintance. šŸ˜‰

    Reply
  59. Ghost, a bayonet does sound like the most useless accessory for a pistol. After all, if the bullets didn’t finish them off, a bayonet would probably just tickle them. Like I said about the steel coils when I was a guard at the plant, if anyone can pick one up and carry it away in his hands, he can have it!

    Reply
  60. GR6, a bayonet equipped Glock might be wise in a confined space; saves your hearing.

    Evan, always make certain your gig line is correct when meeting with Willy Peter. Else it will result in, DĆ©posez et donnez-moi vingt-cinq!!

    Reply
  61. Ah, sandcastler was also on the lookout. Of course, I was suggesting that what GR6 MEANT to say was to hit that office scum in the head with a cheese, not that we take my suggested action after consuming the tasty treat he was describing, but hey, what I have forgotten about French would fill volumes…

    Et heureusement, il est venu dans le monde pour sauver les pƩcheurs, dont je suis le pire.

    Reply
  62. I actually know of a case locally where a young (17 y.o.) gang-banger wannabe thrust his pistol into his waistband in the so-called “appendix carry”. In doing so, he violated the first three of Col. Jeff Cooper’s “Four Rules of Gun Safety”.

    1. All guns are always loaded. Even if they are not, treat them as if they are.
    2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
    3. Keep your finger off the trigger till your sights are on the target.
    4. Identify your target, and what is behind it.

    The resulting discharge in his pants (the first one, I mean…the one from the gun) proved the wisdom of Rule #2. I’m sure that young man now gives thanks nightly and thusly: “Thank you dear Lord for giving me two of them.”

    Reply
  63. Lady Mindy, I think you’d be hard-pressed to actually come up with something that is “off topic” around here. šŸ™‚

    For some reason, that photo makes a song run through my head: “Soft kitty, warm kitty…”.

    Reply
  64. Sandcastler, vous l’avez dit! Mais le Ghost Rider sur terre semble prĆ©fĆ©rer les balles de gros calibre…

    I have to laugh at myself, because Sandcastler previously had asked God to have pity on our lost/sinful souls. As I was pondering the meaning of the adjective, I got a mite confused; the French word for “sinners” is “pĆ©cheurs,”–the word for “fishers” is “pĆŖcheurs.” I was having trouble connecting “souls” with “fishing…” Yep, that little accent makes a big difference… the difference between being witty and sounding like a lunatic. I am pretty adept at the latter…

    Reply
  65. GR6, that is a very appropriate prayer for that gentleman. I was afraid you were going to relate that something singular had taken its leave during the incident. He should indeed be grateful!

    Reply
  66. Speaking of convenience store robberies, Monday night, a young male wearing baggy clothes and no mask, pulled out a gun and attempted to rob the largest store of my company’s in town. He came in and said, “Everyone on the ground!” The three (THREE!) employees working were all “Huh?” The not very scary (5’2″, very stoned) would-be crook got flustered and ran out.

    Reply
  67. I should add, most convenience stores are louder than you think. Between all of the cooling things (coolers, freezers, etc), electronics, customers, HVAC, the ambient noise level is high enough that unless you yell, your voice isn’t going to carry very far.

    Reply
  68. Dear Mindy from Indy, good story of the would-be robber, and I learned something I didn’t know about noisy stores. Your cat is very pretty and cozy looking, but I said to myself,”just wait until a spark jumps out of the fire … oh wait, though, it’s not a real fire !!”

    Reply
  69. MfI, thanks for info on noise level in the store. Now I know why the guy at the counter keeps telling me they have no parakeets when I ask for a pack of Swisher Sweets.

    Reply
  70. More likely dum-dums, I think.

    My nomination for the most inept armed robbery ever…the man who walked up to the registration window of a motel; pointed a revolver at the desk clerk; and shot the clerk in the left shoulder. The clerk instinctively grabbed the robber’s gun hand to prevent him from shooting again. The robber jerked his hand upwards and away, bringing the muzzle of the gun up toward his face, and managed to shoot himself cleanly in the head. The clerk survived; the robber did not.

    Lady Mindy, the stoner probably forgot what he was there for when the employees went off script.

    Reply
  71. My nomination for the “How Not to Be a Good Citizen Award” goes to the bank customer standing at a teller window who noticed the man standing at the next window was carrying a pistol under his jacket. Assuming the man was a robber (rather than a police office, which he was), he decided the best way to alert his teller without tipping off the “robber” was to turn over his deposit slip, write G U N on it in large letters, and show it to the teller.

    Wrong.

    Reply
  72. Hello again, Village. I am back awake and cooking pot roast which I hope works out, I took my older daughter’s advice and added the veggies at the end instead of the beginning, as recipe said. Her comment was that most slow cooker recipes were for working women/men who needed to put them on when they left, to be ready when they returned home.

    Which sounds sensible.

    Youngest daughter says there is a photo on Facebook of the garbage collectors standing over my oldest’s cans of castoffs for 20 minutes pulling out stuff she discarded.

    One man’s treasure another’s trash.

    Kittens are outside my window behind computer. I wonder if I raised window and took off screen they might come in?

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  73. My store, being old is really bad. Standing in the “beverage corner,” you can’t hear much of anything. Coffee, slushie, fountain (especially the carbinator), HVAC vent, and cooler – all in a four foot area. And the mircowave is also in this little “zone” as well. When everything happens to be on at once, you might as well use semaphore flags.

    sandcastlerā„¢ Parakeets! If that is true, that is awesome. Oddly, Marlboro and Pall Mall are the worst to distinguish – mainly because around here, Marlboro is pronounced “MAR-brawl.” And, more useless knowledge for you all: “Swisher” is now a proprietary eponym. Much like “coke” is used for soda, or “kleenex” for tissue, a “swisher” is single, unipped cigarello (and in certain sectors, sliced open to introduce “extras”).

    Reply
  74. Since I am fairly certain Sand lives in Houston area, it would surprise me if the convenience store clerks speak English. But I haven’t lived there in 20 years, so maybe things are improved. I used to have linguistic problems!

    My Spanish is so poor now I am forbidden to speak it but the clerks in Houston were not often Hispanic but from assorted Eastern nations. Now I believe they are often so international it is hard to pinpoint a county of origin.

    That is fine with me, so long as they speak English!

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  75. White River Fish Market Tulsa, OK menu is mouth-watering.

    A Brit. would have no trouble distinguishing MARL-buh-ruh from Pell Mell.

    Is that ‘hein’ at the end French or German?

    Reply
  76. The major, tree-lined in art thoroughfare paralleling Pall Mall to the SE is The Mall, pronounced MOW, as in ‘ouch!’. ‘Enry ‘Iggins’ said/sang ‘Why cahn’t the English teach their children how to speak?’ Because it’s so bloody ‘ard.

    Reply
  77. emb, the hein is French. And since you asked so nicely, here is the thread, filtered through my sketchy command of Le Francais:

    “Jackie, actually that would be ā€œLard confiture sur le fromage de brie et de pain grillĆ© de le FantĆ“meā€, ”

    >>”Bacon jam on cheese brie and toast of the phantom”,<>GR6, maybe you meant to say, ‘Hit this office scum in the head with a cheese,” eh?<>Lord, have mercy on these sinful/lost souls<>And fortunately, He came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the worst.<>Continue your wicked ways and the Ghost Rider in the sky will not bombard you with cheese curds.<>Sandcastler, you said it! But the Ghost Rider on Earth seems to prefer large caliber bullets…<<

    Those more adept should feel free to correct my efforts. šŸ™‚

    Reply
  78. Oops, brackets do not play well with the comment checker software. Let me try again, without them.

    “Jackie, actually that would be ā€œLard confiture sur le fromage de brie et de pain grillĆ© de le FantĆ“meā€, ”

    Bacon jam on cheese brie and toast of the phantom

    “GR6, peut-ĆŖtre vous avez voulu dire, ā€œFrappez cette racaille de bureau dans la tĆŖte avec un fromage,ā€ hein? ”

    GR6, maybe you meant to say, ‘Hit this office scum in the head with a cheese,”eh?

    “Seems GR6 and Evan are up to some stange behavior. They are going to consume toast slathered in bacon grease, then go to the head office to hit some guy with a cheese. Seigneur, ayez pitiĆ© de ces Ć¢mes pĆ©cheresses.”

    Lord, have mercy on these sinful/lost souls

    “Et heureusement, il est venu dans le monde pour sauver les pĆ©cheurs, dont je suis le pire.”

    And fortunately, He came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the worst.

    “Continuez vos mauvaises voies et le Ghost Rider dans le ciel ne vous bombarder de fromage en grains.”

    Continue your wicked ways and the Ghost Rider in the sky will not bombard you with cheese curds.

    “Sandcastler, vous lā€™avez dit! Mais le Ghost Rider sur terre semble prĆ©fĆ©rer les balles de gros calibreā€¦”

    Sandcastler, you said it! But the Ghost Rider on Earth seems to prefer large caliber bullets…

    And there you are.

    Reply
  79. Did anyone other than me read/watch the article about the two guys from Mississippi who started in 1980’s making their own movie of “Raiders of the Lost Ark” and raising the money this year on Kickstarter to finish it by blowing up an airplane, etc. for the finale after about 40 years?

    Now that was dedication and obsession. Seems they raised $58,000 on Kickstarter to do this, more than they asked for. And less than they needed, it turns out.

    The part that was fascinating was that they became underground heroes and a cult movie without realizing it!

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  80. Jackie Monies # . My husband, Mike is color blind, my daughterā€™s husband is color blind. Will my grandson Jack also be color blind? Or will it depend on what type color blindness each male has?

    Mike: hY x Jackie H? –> daughter Hh. d.husb. hy x wife H? –> Jack ?y.

    I’m using H as the allele on the X-chromosome for normal vision, h as the allele for r-g color-blindness. You didn’t say any of the women were colorblind, or had colorblind fathers, hence the assumption they have at least one H. Hard to tell if a woman is HH or Hh, unless she has a colorblind son, which would tell you she’s Hh. But I don’t know the answer to, “will it depend on what type color blindness each male has?” Why? Because I don’t know which of the two sites [one for red vision, the other green] mutates from H to h to yield the allele h for RGCB. If both can, then the H/h scheme is too simple. A guy wouldn’t know which allele he has, he just cannot tell red from green. I’ve never heard of this being a problem, but I’m no geneticist. A search might yield an answer. Also, have to back and read me my long answers above.
    ““““““““““““`
    Nobody tried the multiple choice question:
    Edna, of course, had gotten a colorblindness gene from ā€œEdwardā€, a fellow biology prof. He, having only one X-chromosome and a colorblind daughter, was therefore colorblind. Later, the youngest daughter, ā€œEthelā€, also sat down front, and did not raise her hand. In addition to helping me demonstrate X-linked inheritance, the three also confirmed a common phenomenon: ā€œA-students sit down frontā€. [I think Ethel got her MD or PhD in the ’90s.]

    If either Mabel or Ethel bear a son who can see, what is the probability that he will be red-green colorblind? a. 0 b. 25% c. 50% d. 100% e. Cannot tell, because we donā€™t know if his father could tell red from green.

    Reply
  81. Debbe šŸ˜‰ I just thought of you. I was watching the Auburn-Georgia football game when they played the Carhartt commercial, “Weatherman”, showing various people working in various Carhartt garments in various cold, wet, snowy and blustery conditions. The tag line was “For Those Outwork Them All”.

    Now you know why I thought of you. Stay warm, hon. šŸ™‚

    Reply
  82. Jackie, correct on location. The language of commerce here is Babel. Spanish is a second tongue eveywhere you go. Chinese, Vietnamese, French, Russian, Arabic, Japanese, and dozens of English dialects are commonly heard on the street.

    Loon and I have varying levels of linguistic skills in: French, German, Russian, Vietnamese, Slovak, and Farsi; but none in Spanish other than ordering off the menu. When in Europe we usually get mistaken for German or Dutch.

    Reply
  83. Ghost, and then there’s the sequel: The Search for the Lost Sofa Change.
    Speaking of Blade Runner, did you know there is a Final Director’s Cut on the way? Story in the Daily Telegraph quoted Ridley Scott as saying the studio made him soften things in the first release and now he finally has it the way he wanted it.

    Reply
  84. I just spent a LARGE amount of time reading about the kids from Mississippi (from coast near where JJ used to live about that time) who made “Raiders of the Lost Ark” recreation during summer vacations between 1982-1989. The Vanity Fair article alone took forever to read and was excellent writing.

    There are Youtube clips of the movie and you can buy copies of the video/movie. A potential movie is being promoted about the kids/filmmakers and the making of the movie.

    But to me the fascination is the obsession of a bunch of kids to do something like this for years and years, the great potential shown by the three and the reality of what happens to them as adults.
    Their movie gets “discovered” and shown at an Austin, TX Indie Festival or at least festival, they meet Steven Spielberg and become cult underground film makers.

    Up until this point, their adult lives just weren’t showing much potential or “real” success.

    And since I am fairly familiar with the Mississippi Gulf Coast, it was interesting to read the locales and people involved. And I bet JJ is totally familiar with it all?

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  85. Here is where a weird kind of coincidence occurs. I have always thought that JJ borrowed his character Gus and the seafood restaurant, Mary Lou the daughter perhaps from a REAL restaurant on the Gulf Coast called Gus Stevens. Real name Gus Stevens Kouvarakis, who was a real coastal wheeler dealer and character. His claims to fame are many but among them the fact it was his restaurant where Jayne Mansfield performed for the last time the night she was killed in a car wreck. Her driver was an employee of the restaurant and boyfriend of Gus’ daughter who was pregnant unknown to parents. He was also killed in wreck and it was Gus’ car they were all in.

    But that Raiders of the Lost Ark tribute film was made by Gus’ grandson and mentions the restaurant, his grandfather, talks about his Greek mother and father, whom divorce and then she becomes a local television newscaster and marries the station owner, becoming wealthy before divorcing again apparently.

    This intrigued me more because I always have thought this was who JJ based Gus, Mary Lou and the Dock on. But it may just be coincidence. Everything is gone now, Gus, the restaurant, the mob, the gambling, the wheeling and dealing.

    The real Gus had two daughters also. And JJ’s Gus is more likeable and benign, cleaner wheeler dealer too.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  86. Jackie, you didn’t mention that Jayne’s three children were in the back seat of the Buick Deuce-and-a-Quarter when it ran underneath the rear of a tractor trailer in the early morning fog. The children, asleep on the seat, survived. One of them was her then 3-year-old daughter, Mariska Hargitay, the actress.

    In the late ’60s, my Dad managed a nearby business, and he and his boss often stopped in at Gus Stevens Supper Club after work for happy hour and to watch the topless go-go girls. Small world.

    Reply
  87. Good morning Villagers….

    Checked out Whether.com and we are under a winter advisory….yeah!!!!!!! We right on the line, didn’t notice the name of the storm though…up to 5 inches with wind chill factors below zero tomorrow night…..yeah!!!!!! Got my Carharts ready šŸ™‚

    GR šŸ˜‰ I will be working with Dakota today, and will ask him, but I doubt if he knows what he actually bought. As I was wondering if he really knew what he had. The pic is almost, if not, identical, and I did notice the bolt on the gun. I’m not very savy when it comes to guns and rifles, but this one did catch my attention.

    Gotta go….running late.

    ya’ll have a blessed Sunday

    later…..

    Reply
  88. Letting the car warm up…..thought I’d check on BC

    http://www.gocomics.com/bc

    …and we found a rooster in a bottom cage on Friday….Ian came packing him in, and his comb is so red…big boy. Ian named him George….cause he wants to ‘hold him, and squeeze him, and I want to call him George”….anyone remember that one from Bugs Bunny and the Abominable Snowman holding Daffy?

    But George is now on top…crowing away….

    Reply
  89. If either Mabel or Ethel bear a son who can see, what is the probability that he will be red-green colorblind? a. 0 b. 25% c. 50% d. 100% e. Cannot tell, because we donā€™t know if his father could tell red from green.

    Mindy from Indy: emb ā€“ I *was* going to wait until Monday šŸ™‚ , but my gut is leaning towards 25%.

    Mindy from Indy: Or 50%. But gut still says 25%.

    Good MC questions are best answered by brains, not guts. It’s 50%. Why?

    Reply
  90. eMb, I will go back and read your posts when the caffeine kicks in and it will make sense, but I can tell you that while Husband has full sight his brother is red/green colorblind. They have two sisters but I don’t know if either of them is colorblind, nor their offspring. Nor have I ever heard if their father was.

    I saw an article a couple of weeks ago that offers the theory that some women might have a different set of rods or cones in their eyes that allow them to see dozens of colors that the rest of us cannot. I wish I could remember details, but as I said, the caffeine hasn’t kicked in yet.

    Debbe, I think my two favorite cartoons are Ali Baba Bunny and What’s Opera Doc?

    Reply
  91. Ghost, I have to admit having gone to Gus Stevens when I was young, teens and young adult. He got really good acts, some of whom were same entertainers that my stepdads old partner booked in his supper club up in Monroe, LA. Both Gus and Johnny were Greek and both had successful restaurants/nightclubs with “big name” entertainers.

    Gus’ was called the Buccaneer but no one called it anything except Gus Stevens. When I started reading A and J and Gus was a character, I immediately thought “Gus Stevens” and that it might be that JJ had worked there, as he sure knows his seafood restaurant and Gulf Coast wheeling dealing pretty well. Gus started with nothing, don’t think he had much education but he made a ton of money, was known for being tight with it.

    For a look at what Gus looked like, scroll down to bottom of this article and look at the little short man whose head is about as high as Jayne Mansfield’s breasts. He always had a cigar in his mouth like our Gus and dressed like ours does. Coincidence?

    http://www.wyes.org/local/history/

    My favorite anecdote was that Gus put slot machines in kitchen area to get money from his bus boys. The place had gambling, very illegal, mob and police were paid off, as Ghost said, topless entertainers. One of my boyfriends then was professional gambler in college, so I have been in “back rooms”. I went as date since I was pretty arm candy back then.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  92. Love the Warner Brothers cartoons with the Abominable Snowman, but….

    The line was originally from the book “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck. The character, Lennie, was a big, developmentally disabled guy. He loved small, soft creatures. But he loved so much – and hugged so hard – the creatures inevitably were crushed. A very moving book…

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  93. emb – I did my punnett square wrong, that’s why. šŸ™‚ I did H, h across both top and left, not XH, Xh across top for mom and XH, Y down left for dad. Top left and right would be girls, one with normal vision, the other with normal vision, but a carrier. The bottom left would be normal sighted boy, and bottom right would be color-blind boy. Two boys, one each way = 50%. Better?

    Reply
  94. And I think 50% chance is what my daughter said about my grandson but they don’t know yet if he is color blind? He is only 2 1/2 now and they can’t test until older?
    She solved problem of color blind husband by buying him all his socks and slacks and shirts same color and identical.

    When my husband had to know colors as a salesman we solved problem by always putting samples in exact color progressions. It used to drive our bosses nuts that their best salesman was colorblind, since colors were so important in floral sales!

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  95. Darn it, I did not link to right photo of Gus Stevens who I think is the character Gus from A and J! It takes you to right website but not the photo I intended!

    You CAN’T teach old dogs new tricks apparently, as I am hopeless on computer linking.

    It did cause me to read and look at a lot of old photos of the Mississippi Gulf Coast, which was sad actually. I was in Hawaii when Hurricane Camille hit coast and it destroyed everything. I went back one time when I returned to New Orleans to work again and it was so sad, I cried and cried and cried. Would never go back.

    So, finally the coast began recovering and I went back again and didn’t cry. Then Hurricane Katrina hit. Ditto. Mom wanted to go back, she’d heard casinos were open again. I went and cried and cried and cried.

    Some things never change.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  96. Jackie, I’ll admit I’d considered the apparent similarities of “that” Gus and “our” Gus. Then throw in Jimmy’s connection to the Mississippi Gulf Coast and…

    Re “back rooms”, I have a friend who was stationed at Keesler AFB in Biloxi in pre-Camille days who tells me the area was full of places that were much larger on the outside than they appeared to be on the inside. Also lots of beer bars with pinball machines that let you cash in the points you scored on them, he said. He claimed to usually pay his bar tab, including rounds for his buddies, with his winnings.

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  97. It’s probably understandable why the plots of some of John Grisham’s novels are obviously based on things that actually happened on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

    Reply
  98. Back from an internet outage, ISP vanished sometime last. Ever try to look up a customer service number when the phonebook won’t work. Now I get the Gus comments. Who is Jayne? I don’t recall her appearing in any strips.

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  99. We are talking about Gus Stevens Kouvarakis who owned the Gus Stevens seafood restaurant in Biloxi, MS (gone now, as is Gus) The Jayne is Jayne Mansfield who used to appear there a lot and was coming from the restaurant/club when she was killed in car crash.

    The photo I found that looked like our Gus on A and J was one where he is hugging Jayne and is so short, his head comes to her chest level. He also always wore shirts like the ones the A and J Gus wears and smoked a cigar at all times. He was known as a tightwad, uneducated but a big wheeler, dealer and made a ton of money. Also ran illegal gambling, strippers, topless dancers. This was racy stuff in the 1950-1970 period!

    I have thought JJ based our Gus on this guy, who was a real character, and yes I knew him but just as customer and sometimes visitor to the back room gambling casino he ran. With my dates, not Mike, although I do think we may have continued eating there? He looked so much like our Gus as I remember him, it is eerie.

    He even had a daughter with an out of wedlock pregnancy.

    Writers write about what they know, even for comic strips and I am sure JJ either worked there or knew those who did?

    And in a town where schooners played an important part in the history of the place, it would not be unusual to have one tied up in back of restaurant either,

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  100. Jackie, the link to the magazine cover came from a website set up by Gus’ granddaughter from that out-of-wedlock pregnancy. Seems that the driver of the car carrying Jayne on her last road trip was the father of this woman. According to what showed on the internet, she now lives in OK herself.

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  101. I didn’t mean to be anonymous yesterday, although, under the circumstances, maybe it was for the best. When last seen we were having gremlins in the computer. My wife had the same problems for awhile. I guess someone fed them after midnight. I can’t claim that I’ve been busy when I see what others are facing but I will say that I’ve been good busy instead of bad. Our contractor now tells us that it will be at least January before the house is done. Debbe, I’m glad that you found your cat. This morning I let Cilla out for a lizard search and she went full speed for what I thought was a frog, but it turned out to be a baby bird. I rescued the bird and it appeared to be unhurt as Cilla plays catch and release with whatever she catches. No frost yet although we’ve been close . 20’s predicted for the middle of the week.

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  102. Did you notice the prices on that Gus Stevens menu? “I’ll have the half stuffed lobster to start, then two T-bones with a filet mignon on the side, please.”

    One of the places I miss most from the Coast of yore is the Friendship House restaurant on Hwy 90 at “Mississippi City”. Ever have breakfast there after a long night, Jackie? Or dinner at Chappy’s in Long Beach? Or Vrazel’s in Gulfport? And what was the name of the restaurant over the Long Beach Yacht Club’s club house?

    John Chapman rebuilt Chappy’s Seafood Restaurant after Camille, lost it again to Katrina, and moved to Nashville and opened Chappy’s there. I understand he has now returned to the Coast and opened Chappy’s Bistro in one of the new Gulfport hotels built by a friend of his.

    (Chappy’s Bistro? Hummm.)

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  103. Dang. Watching the Saints game and they just showed two ladies eating beignets. I may just have to try my luck at making some, as it may be a while before I can make it back to NOLA. I wonder if Cafe Du Monde still sells their beignet mix?

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  104. Keep it up, Jackie. I’ll soon be trying to fit everything in A&J into a Mississippi Gulf Coast context. šŸ™‚

    Yep, Cafe du Monde Beignet Mix is available at Wally World, according to their web site.

    sand, you may have that confused with “chappo bistritis”. No worries, though, as a double Irish whiskey latte should still be a palliative, if not a curative, potion for the condition.

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  105. Was that the original Mary Mahoney’s? Definitely remember the Friendship House. Which restaurant was Italian and had huge trees growing through the roof of dining room? I mean oak trees!
    Restaurant built around the trees.

    I also remember a huge white restaurant, maybe the Colonial?

    Actually what I remember most about both supper club restaurants were that they had good entertainers. I remember Brother Dave Gardner, Jerry Vandyke, Ray Stevens, Jerry Lee Lewis. I know that Gus Stevens used African American entertainers and I could swear that was where I saw Ray Charles and Fats Domino. I don’t think club in my home town was using black performers back in 1960’s.

    Thought the prices were unbelievable but maybe we didn’t in the 1960’s? I noticed $3.50 was cost of cover for Jayne Mansfield show and I remember $5 was a high cover back then.

    If you were a teenager back in those days, these clubs still let you in but you might have to drink sodas. I just remembered seeing Fats Domino in my hometown, which is strange? I can see him at that big baby grand playing.

    Love, Jackie

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  106. Ghost, I do think of A and J in a Mississippi Gulf Coast setting, even though Jimmy throws in some snow now and then to confuse us.

    It is snowing up here right now.

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  107. GR6 said: “Yep, Cafe du Monde Beignet Mix is available at Wally World, according to their web site.” There is a disturbing message somewhere inside that sentence.

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  108. No, Jackie, Mary Mahoney’s Old French House Restaurant has been in the same location for like forever, and as far as I know, still is. (That’s where I had breakfast with a lady friend one morning and had to tell her if she didn’t quit smiling at me like that, everyone would know what we had done the previous night.)

    The While Pillars was in the old mansion on Beach Boulevard near the Biloxi Light House. Specialties of the House were Eggplant Napoleon and Eggplant Josephine, for which I have a copy of what is supposed to be the original recipes. It was closed for years, but I understand it was renovated by the family that owes it with the idea that someone would lease it for a restaurant. I don’t know if it is open or not.

    The Italian place sounds like Hugo’s in downtown Biloxi, but there were no trees in it that I recall. Hugo’s has a Jayne Mansfield connection, also. There is an April of 1963 photo of her at Hugo’s, showing her with owner Hugo Rungo and Deputy Sheriff Frenchie Brochard (what a great name!) who served as her bodyguard during her visit to Biloxi. (I tried to link to the photo, but its URL is about 250 characters long.)

    There was great little cafe on Division Street near Hugo’s that was owned by a family of shrimpers. The fried shrimp you were served at night had been unloaded from their boat that morning.

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  109. GR šŸ˜‰ it was a MAS-36. and Dakota had bought it off of a friend who had bought it from a licensed dealer. And it did come with a bayonet I give the 15 year old credit. he did some research on the rifle and found that some 1.1 million were manufactured during that time.

    Then the little squirt had to bring in his hunting rifle…an HR 44 rifle, and when he showed me the ammo, I asked what the ‘red’ points were on the tip of the ammo….then he showed me the slits on the ammo…I asked him to explain to me the ‘red’ tip, the grooves and etc…..I told him then it did not seem to be a “sporting’ event….all I could think of was Bambi calling out for his Mother…… I don’t like deer season around here…

    Tired…signing off for the night….My wonderful husband has yeast and bread loaves baking in the oven….with fried chicken…….

    Good ending to a fiasco at both, antiquated hen houses…..I am home…and I am warm with cats in my lap…

    Indy Mindy….love your new cat pad….and the fireplace….stay warm my friend.

    Good night….

    Reply
  110. Ok. Here we go. An airliner was preparing to depart and the captain turned on the PA. “This is Captain so-and-so. We’ll be flying at 25,000 feet, etc. etc.” Now the Captain had had a busy day and was already tired so he forgot to turn off the mike. He says to the co-pilot “I sure could go for a nice piece of (beep) and a good cup of coffee right now.” Well, you could have heard a pin drop on the airplane as everyone had heard what he said. A stewardess rushes toward the front to tell the captain what happened when a voice calls out “Don’t forget the coffee.”

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  111. GR6: “. . . breakfast with a lady friend one morning and had to tell her if she didnā€™t quit smiling at me like that, everyone would know what we had done the previous night.”

    Reminds me of Edda’s bemused smile as she walked Brussels’ streets the morning after curing lover boy’s hiccups. Brooke is a good draftsman. I’ve lost the plotline, too, but still enjoy the strip.

    Reply
  112. EMB, that reminds me of the first morning after when my wife-to-be had received a delivery of flowers from me and she told me on the phone that everyone in her office had told her that those were morning after flowers.

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  113. Mark, unlike my favorite New Orleans chef, John Besh, whose bio describes him as “chef, television personality, philanthropist, restaurant owner and author.”

    I find it interesting that he considers his philanthropy more important than being a restaurant owner or cookbook author.

    During Katrina he organized food kitchens and cooked and provided meals to everyone, emergency personnel, military, anyone needing to be fed. He located and paid all his employees, made sure they were safe. And he paid them until they reopened.

    He has been credited with revitalizing and preserving local food sources, has set up loans for small farmers, total programs to help local small businesses that are vital to the restaurant industry. The emergency rations and military meals using Louisiana seafood and ingredients he helped create may get him knighted!

    No, I prefer to eat at restaurants of those I admire. And it doesn’t hurt the food is great too.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  114. Jerry: Were They?

    Sand and M/I: Mindy / Indy . . .. The is snow sticking to the ground now. sand. MfI, keep the snow.

    We have 2-3″ on the ground now. Even if it doesn’t snow again for weeks, and highs stay in the 20s or lower, that won’t keep ’til 25 Dec, because snow sublimes slowly but surely. But it will likely snow lots more, so we probably will have a white 25 Dec.

    The deer would prefer the snow leave, but it’s hard on the little guys at and below ground level. Also on people whose pipes are not buried deep enough. Ours in the townhome community are: 6′.

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  115. Jerry: I believe that geyser at the far left is one of YNP’s biggest, but not so predictable ones. Somewhere the NPS has/had a diagram of the geyser basin with names of the geysers with arrows pointing down to the geysers.

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  116. Debbe. I clicked on your radar and got either Reno, NV or Las Vegas, I forget which. I know you are not raising chickens/eggs in Nevada!

    We have had steady snow all afternoon.

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  117. Been raining nearly all day here. Coming down hard enough now to put my satellite out, right in the middle of the Battle for Helm’s Deep in Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers. Oh well, got it on DVD if I really want to watch it.

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  118. Daughter is driving here from Illinois and I have been nervous wreck all day. Finally called her. She said I-44 has been one jackknifed 18 wheeler after another with heavy snow entire way. She said she’d just been sitting for an hour because a snow plow/truck had wrecked and dumped entire load of sand in pile on highway.

    She is still two hours or more away on normal conditions. I suspect it will take four hours tonight. I already cut all my nails off to stop biting them and ate a bag of pita chips!

    Love, Jackie

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  119. Lady Mindy, it all made perfect sense to me. šŸ™‚ But then, I’ve probably spent a lot more time around Cajuns than you have.

    My best Cajun collĆØgue has been saying for years that a pirogue pulled by eight alligators was how Santa always came to visit on Christmas Eve when he was growing up down on the bayou. I always tell him that couldn’t be right…Santa could have only made eight stops, because at each stop the family would have grabbed one of the gators to fix for Christmas dinner. (BTW, when he started first grade in Louisiana, he spoke *no* English whatsoever.)

    Prayers for the safety of Jackie’s daughter and all others travelling in inclement weather conditions tonight.

    Reply
  120. Sand, funny you mentioned the French version, I was just reading over the list of famous people I went to school with at the University of Louisiana Lafayette (then USL) in the 1960’s. While there was a wide assortment like Richard Simmons and George Rodrigue, most of them seemed to end up as politicians! I think that had to do with me writing about campus politicians and students who were involved most in activities. Politicians do that early in life.

    I do not speak a word of French unless it is on a menu and I had to send Mike for a crash course in French when he became a wine salesman/representative. No one in his family spoke a word of French which seemed strange since they had been there for ages.
    Found out ancestors were actually Spanish-Portuguese from Africa, so they would have had to learn French too as a second language.

    Still covet a Blue Dog painting.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  121. My Cajun buddy was reared in Terrebonne Parish, so…

    Don’t worry, Jackie, we won’t blame you for James “Snake Head” Carville. šŸ™‚

    BTW, if anyone thinks I’m being disrespectful to Mr. Carville, his wife once said *she* calls him Snake Head.

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  122. It is supremely odd that ULL (or USL) does NOT claim him as attending the university, nor does his bio mention it at all, although that is where he got nickname Ragin’ Cajun. It does mention LSU and getting a law degree from there and mentions Sigma Nu fraternity which he became a member of after ridiculing them all the years I knew him?

    People change directions and politicians do frequently it seems!

    Daughter made it here finally. I am relieved.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  123. Sigh of relief all over the country from the many Villagers worrying about your daughter, Jackie. So glad she got there okay. The drive must have been horrible; she was courageous to even start the trip.

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  124. Debbe šŸ™‚ I assume Dakota has a H&R “Break Open” Handi-Rifle in .44 Magnum caliber, with Hornady .44 Remington Magnum Flex Tip ammo. No, I’m afraid neither Bambi’s daddy nor mommy would stand much of a chance against that…assuming he can get close enough and can shoot straight. And of course the rifle is a single-shot model, giving the deer a bit better chance.

    Disclaimer: I don’t deer hunt, although I don’t begrudge those who do, especially when it helps feed their families, as it so often does in this area. Not to mention that the white tail population has reached almost pest status around here.

    Good report on your daughter, Jackie. Severe weather in this area; I’d estimate winds here at about 40-45 MPH right now, with heavy rain.

    Reply
  125. She showed me radar of the I-44 corridor she had driven all day and it was horrible. Of course I knew that, having watched it all day. She drives from north of St. Louis, then drops down onto I-44. She said snow was beautiful but so heavy, every 5 minutes Jack would point out windows and say “Snow!”

    The entire trip! Snow! Snow! Snow!

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  126. Driving home from daughter’s in western Colorado.. Stayed for eight days in camper. Driving home through New Mexico to avoid snow and cold crossing the Rockies. Snowed on us overnight at Gallup, then got down to 3 degrees (F) on the way to Clovis. The water pipes in the camper are all frozen. Hopefully they will thaw safely as the camper warms up overnight. Cold weather followed despite our best efforts!

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  127. In this part of the country many hunters spend far more on their equipment and supplies than any legal amount of venison would sell for at a store! For too many the exercise is nothing more than an excuse to get drunk out in the woods.

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  128. Good morning Villagers…..

    Ah ha….the bulk of the snow went south of us, we only got about and inch and a half….but then tonight it’s 11 degrees with winds of 16 to 20 miles….arrrggghhhh!!!!!

    The ‘garage’ door to the cooler broke yesterday at work…..going to be a cold day in the packing room today….and, yes, there will be Carharts.

    On deer hunting, I do realize that it does thin the population. Crane Naval Defense, Crane, Indiana, (which is about 30 miles north of me) would allow hunters in once a year to thin out the deer population…but only in designated areas. And yes, I do know that it helps feed some families. But I am like TR, sometimes it’s just an excuse to drink and shoot….and the two don’t go together.

    Jean….you can bring those cartoons up on U Tube. šŸ™‚

    Gal šŸ™‚ , never read the book, but saw the black and white version with John Malcovich (?) in that role, and Gary Senise. Would love to see that movie again.

    And Jackie, very happy your daughter made it safely, especially with little Jack in tow. She must have steady nerves…I have know idea why it copied Reno on that link.

    Jerry…love your jokes šŸ™‚

    gotta go……

    ya’ll have a blessed day

    GR šŸ˜‰ and yes, Dakota likes to drive me nuts….on purpose. I sometimes wonder what’s worse, a 15 year old or the two year old I am babysitting tonight.

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  129. David…glad you also made it home safely….I don’t think anyone is ‘excused’ from this winter storm “Bozeman”…..looked at the national radar, and it doesn’t look good for the east cast either.

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  130. I was curious whether the camera was on at Old Faithful and it is. There’s just enough light to tell that it’s poring rain there. Uh-oh, here comes our lightning.

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  131. “BTW, if anyone thinks Iā€™m being disrespectful to Mr. Carville, his wife once said *she* calls him Snake Head.”

    GR6, she emphasized that she RESPECTFULLY calls him snakehead. šŸ˜‰

    Back when she had a radio show, Mary Matalin got exercised at a certain company’s policies and encouraged her listeners to call and complain. The company was overwhelmed, and they indignantly contacted her and told her that she’d better tell her listeners to stop or else. So later in the program she said something to this effect:

    “I asked you to call 800-xxx-xxxx and complain to X Company. I have been told by X Company that I now have to tell you to NOT to call 800-xxx-xxxx and complain, or else. It seems when you call 800-xxx-xxxx, it ties up their switchboard and nobody else can call 800-xxx-xxxx. It makes them very, very angry when you call 800-xxx-xxxx, so I am asking you to NOT call 800-xxx-xxxx. Do NOT call 800-xxx-xxxx as this makes them very, very angry. Again, do NOT call 800-xxx-xxxx and tie up their phone lines. 800-xxx-xxxx is the number you should not call, that’s 800-xxx-xxxx. Hopefully, this will end the complaint calls to 800-xxx-xxxx and the fact that this makes the higher ups at X Company, whose number is 800-xxx-xxxx, livid, should cease to be an irritating problem once you stop calling 800-xxx-xxxx, that’s 800-xxx-xxxx .”

    She is certainly nothing if not respectful.

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  132. Daughter and husband gone to Tulsa for radiation treatment. She and he will stay in Tulsa all week and not drive back and forth. He says driving is so painful (he doesn’t drive but sits) he can’t stand pain of Oklahoma’s rough roads. If you have never driven on one of our roads that might not seem right, but I promise you, if you are asleep and drive over border (as passenger) you will suddenly wake up! If you are asleep and driving, even better wake up call!

    Lots of snow out there but already getting ugly from animal tracks. Just looked to see if possum left feral cats any food in dishes. He seems to come by on a “schedule” at night. Not very big or old it seems, pretty fur.

    My home place in the Mississippi Delta has two industries now, farming and deer hunting. As I grew up, it was mostly local people and they butchered and ate their kill but I always hated deer hunting. It was excuse for large numbers of males in family to tromp around in the mud and cold, bring tons of mud into house to be cleaned up and eat a lot, sleep and do it all over the next day. Guess who got to do cooking and cleaning?

    Now you can lease your property for hunting and make more than you can farming it. They turned the swamps/woods across from our farm into a giant public hunting grounds and now there are thousands of weekend/vacation hunters who invade.

    I think TruckerRon is correct in most respects, it is an excuse for a big drinking party, people seemed to often accidently shoot cows, horses and each other!

    Love, Jackie

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  133. Just read today’s real time strip, which is hilarious! Mike sings that song, exactly like Arlo does, in front of mirror and with posing! Has for years! Who originated song?

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  134. Jackie: According to Tom Lehrer, he shot “7 hunters, 2 game wardens, and a purebred Guernsey cow”, and they took away his license because “cows were out of season.” You can probably find it on YouTube. Peace, emb

    TIP BlogSpot and Comic are the same today, but I neglected to copy the URL.

    Jerry: Past years NPS has left the webcam on. Good for watching bison.

    Reply
  135. Way up top somewhere about favorite Bugs Bunnys – I would have to go with Rabbit Fire, Rabbit Seasoning and Duck! Rabbit! Duck! Sort of a Chuck Jones trilogy

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  136. Looked it up, should have known. Mac Davis of Lubbock, TX wrote and sang, “Lord it’s hard to be humble when you’re perfect in every way”. Also wrote “Happiness is Lubbock, TX in your rearview mirror” and a ton of other songs I did not know he wrote, like for Elvis and other singers. More of songwriter even than singer, although he did win country singer of year award.

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  137. Janis is 92% naked in today’s strip. (Of course I did the math. What did you think?)

    She would undoubtedly look better (not to mention more pert) if she would mind her posture. Such as she did yesterday when wearing those yoga pants, or whatever they were.

    Jackie, Mac Davis did that song.

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  138. OK, Ghost, I noticed that and wondered about your math. When I was young and firm I wore bikinis that had tops smaller than a half slice of toasted bread on each side and about as big a two pieces of apple pie on bottoms. Just big enough to not be arrested for public nudity.

    Janis’ lingerie would have been considered “senior citizen” undies and probably are today, although that is what I wear now! Since I am seldom around popular beaches in Oklahoma nowadays I don’t know, are bikinis worn in public miniscule today? Since no one seems to care about decorum, I’d say yes, invisible.

    Why did no one mention the presenter at movie awards whose bra fell below bottom of breasts in see through blouse? I don’t watch that stuff but it made news articles. News? Along with stoned Johnny Depp. News?

    Popular beaches in Oklahoma is an oxymoron.

    Love, Jackie

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  139. Jackie, I’m sure your contribution to the beach scenery was both noted and greatly appreciated by guys like me. šŸ˜‰

    What Janis is wearing appears to me to be “French-cut” style, which I would definitely not consider “granny panties”.

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  140. Interestingly, while trying to figure out why 9CL had a cease fire in the war, I read a lot of comments and trivia about the strip. It seems that the reason there are no readers’ comments below strip on GoComics is because some years ago trolls infested his comments section and therefore he banned all comments.

    And I did notice Janis was wearing what I call “hi-cuts”. Jimmy must study underwear ads. Along with cats.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  141. My Dad used to go “duck hunting” with one of the nephews. I doubt they ever saw a duck. They just wanted the excuse to get out of doing chores for a day. They would take a bag of sandwiches and a couple of thermoses of coffee and go have a nice guy’s day off.

    Debbe, I have several dvds of Bugs Bunny cartoons, along with the Animaniacs and Tiny Toons ones. šŸ™‚

    Jackie, one of my favorite “memes” that went around last week: http://imgur.com/gallery/dBDkh4K

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  142. I dunno, Jackie. I had heard the same thing, but I suspect that many of what McEldowney called trolls, we may have called critics.

    Also, one would expect all other comics to be subject to the same problem. Yet, how many others on gocomics are closed to comments?

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  143. $4.999 gallon for some good Godiva and I will start hoarding it! It begs the question, how do you hoard chocolate, as in candy? In days when I had candy shop in gift shop/florist, the companies I bought from would not ship chocolates if weather was freezing or hot, which left few months for shipping to Houston. Well, not the freezing parts but sometimes in route the candy went through colder states!

    But we were told to not refrigerate or freeze the chocolates, the consistency changed and heat melted it. If it got too old, it didn’t taste right either and got kind of “mealy” in texture. Godiva wouldn’t sell to you unless you had their special display coolers which were not exactly cold, but you had to have them……

    Enquiring minds want to know. Cathy does too.

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  144. So I clicked on comments on GoComics strips and I couldn’t find any without comments. By the way, did anyone else notice the Wizard of ID crossover strips? They are 50 years old today and that also makes me feel older than Ghost’s comments about Granny panties!

    Except 9CL is commentless. TDS wasn’t too bad about A and J’s strip today and Arlo singing.

    Love, Jackie

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  145. When pieces of chocolate get too cold, then warms, they develop “bloom”, that unattractive whitish plaque-looking stuff (how’s that for a description?) on its surface.

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  146. Time for another TWC rant, boys and girls:

    Last evening, as much of the South was being hit by severe thunderstorms and radar-indicated tornadoes, I switched over to The Weather Channel, only to find that it was running a canned show titled (I swear I am not making this up) “Deadly Sea Foam”. Thanks, TWC. You are indeed a Special Snowflake of a commercial communications company and surely entitled, as you claim, to Special Consideration when engaging in financial negotiations with cable and satellite providers to carry your marginally useful content because of your altruistic contributions to The Common Good.

    Seriously, do everyone a favor and dump all the climate change coverage/happy-talk morning show/reality programming BS and go back to what you were once best at…reporting the current weather.

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  147. No one in Oklahoma will watch them for weather. As Ghost says, a tornado will be coming down the road and they are doing “entertainment”. We just don’t bother much, I keep the two networks in Tulsa that have good weather equipment on during bad weather and they break in as needed or if bad, just stay on air and say “Sorry, we’ll show the programs later.”

    I also keep their weather websites on my frequently visited, so I can click on them. They have better maps than TWC and you can watch the tornadoes until you lose your satellite dish! Some nights they are following a half dozen or more storms simultaneously and accurately. I suspect they are paid more too!

    If you don’t happen to live in tornado alley with highly paid weathermen, I recommend locating a good source of weather other than TWC. They infuriate me!

    Love, Jackie

    Reply
  148. He certainly has a LOW opinion of his readership! He does realize he is speaking of the very people who read him? I think I will no longer click at all on his cartoon on either site and that will lower his audience by at least one daily.

    Somehow I cannot imagine Jimmy saying that about his readers, no matter how annoying we may be.

    Love, Jackie

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  149. Sounds as though McEldowney swallowed a thesaurus at some point and has spent the rest of his life farting it out. An abridged thesaurus, at that…one missing the word “humble” or any of its synonyms.

    You know, somehow that windbagish and pretentious statement seems to fit him to a T. I already knew that he probably wasn’t everyone’s cup of chai. Now the wonder is that he is anyone’s. Other than the three worthies he cited…one of whom he sleeps with, the other two likely being mutual brown-nosers.

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  150. I believe the Internet has spawned a plague of trolls. When a swarm infests a favorite website, I move on. And I rarely read the commentary that accompanies my favorite comics for that reason. Trolls are guilty of casting aspersions on talented people who are doing their best to present their product… and they themselves are incapable of doing anything notable.

    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

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  151. Llee, Trucker’s quote is by Teddy Roosevelt. It is a favorite of mine.

    I went to Chickweed Cafe and read McEldowney’s comments, and decided that if that’s the way he feels, fine. He can do with one less reader. I agree with Ghost that his Big Three fans are the one he sleeps with and the two brown-nosers. Also, from his picture he looks like a singularly unpleasant person. And, I read today’s strip, and have no clue where the story(?) has picked up.

    I never have watched TWC. I am of the “look out the window” school of thought. Yes, I know that doesn’t help when planning trips and such, but it does let me know whether I should carry an umbrella or not.

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  152. And if I might jump back to the topic of hunting for a minute…I have remembered an old joke:

    One day a wife decided she wanted to see why her husband loved to go deer hunting, so she prevailed upon him to take her with him. He got her the proper attire, taught her how to shoot, and told her that when she hit a deer, to stand over it and not let any other hunter take the deer. A few hours into the day the husband heard a shot and ran to where he had left his wife. There she stood, over the body of her kill, shouting “IT’S MINE! I SHOT IT!” He skidded to a stop just in time to hear the other person saying “Fine, lady, you can have it, but can I at least get the bridle and saddle?”

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  153. Jackie, I think what McEldowney objected to most was that unlike most artists, online cartoonists are being compelled to accept any comment, no matter how rude, crude or ignorant sharing space with their material. Unlike JJ’s blog here, which he moderates himself. That is his choice. If his material or behavior offends anyone, he notes that they have the whole of the internet to comment on it, just not on his site. Or they can email him directly about it.

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  154. Jean, people in Georgia ride deer? Now that is the most unusual fact I’ve learned on the internet. Any other attributes you can share will sure to enlighten all in the Village.

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  155. My $8.00 kitty bed investment is paying off. Blacklight has been one with her new digs for most of the afternoon. Actually, at this point, I think she might have melted into the fibers.

    In other news, it is cold and snowy. (Okay, not a news flash, but stating the bloody obvious seems more dignified than the “throwing myself to the ground, screaming and kicking” temper tantrum for summer to get back here I had planned.) And to quasi-answer the question from earlier, yes, I am willing to be adopted for immediate transport to a warmer locale. I can cook, but you all seem to have that under control. šŸ™‚ I also am pretty handy with basic tools, cleaning supplies, and make a decent chauffeur.

    Trolls have no power in reality, so they cause chaos online for a poor analog.

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  156. Jean, I thought it was funny. Personally I was never allowed to ride horses during deer hunting season for that very reason. Horses and riders both got shot a lot, as well as other hunters up in trees being shot out of the branches.

    At 93 my mom is still opening every conversation with a man with “What do you kill?” Sort of disconcerting to some!

    Love, Jackie

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  157. Jackie, I’ve not encountered any hunters of tree-climbing deer. šŸ™‚

    Mark, I completely understand and agree that Mr. McEldowney has the right to suppress comment regarding his work where he has the power to do so and is so disposed. It still puzzles me that his need to do so seems to be somewhat unique among online cartoon artists, at least as represented on gocomics.

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  158. I, too, happened to be watching TWC yesterday when the storms were going through Alabama. The “show” (I’m no fan of many of ’em) was, indeed, broken into several times at, say, 10-minute intervals. I suspect that, with greater damage or potential for damage, those interruptions would have been extended. Had I been living near the storm area, the close-up maps would have served well. Cannot agree that TWC was incorrect in this case, but we each harbor our own opinions.

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  159. The hunter shot out of the tree was on property next to ours where mom hunted. Another grandfather shot his own grandson on same hunting club. Alcohol was reputed to have been being consumed. You have to remember, I am from a long line of deer hunters who followed “codes” of behavior while hunting and shooting guns, like not drinking and seeing what you were shooting. There were even “codes” about who shared in meat, etc.

    In those days hunting clubs were not so much for rich as for land owners and a guest or two, they were even inherited as part of your estate. I started seeing a drastic change by time I was in 20’s which was fifty years ago, when it stopped being locals hunting and people began having club managers, professional game wardens, guaranteed kills, that sort of thing.

    This is what I think will happen to our property, it will become lodge/club and managed. I may be wrong but that is what I am seeing happen to all the Delta properties there. My daughter is OK with that, so it is their decision if it gets made into a money earning deer lodge.

    Ask me about the packs of 20 plus deer hounds I grew up with!
    And the one cat who led the pack, thinking she was one too.

    Love, Jackie

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  160. I am not a hunter and never have been but it is hard not to become involved with their adventures. We have bear on our property also, now more than ever. When I was younger we set out one night into swamps in an old jeep, looking for lost deer dogs and probably a dead deer left in woods. Naturally jeep got stuck in ruts of “road” just as a bear came out of cane brake. All the courageous men/boys climbed on top of jeep and when I tried to join them, got kicked in mouth and a tooth chipped. Still have it, thought about it while reading article about celebrities who have had their teeth/smiles altered.

    Love, Jackie

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  161. Jackie: Ref your previous post, agreed. Anyone who shoots toward another hunter in a tree is at best guilty of violating Rule 4 (be sure of your target) and at worst guilty of negligent homicide, whether alcohol is involved or not.

    Ref your last post, I’m sure which is worse, the lack of chivalry those “gentleman” displayed, or the fact they seriously thought the top of the jeep would provide safety from a bear looking for supper. šŸ™‚

    c ex-p: Fortunately, the local broadcast TV station did an admirable job of keeping people informed with live continuous coverage as multiple radar-indicated tornadoes were entering the area and moving across it at 45 MPH. My point was that TWC was not nearly the reliable informational resource they seem to like to portray themselves as being during severe weather outbreaks.

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  162. Brooke’s defense is verbose, but obviously I cannot fault him for that. He is also well w/in his rights to reject anon. harassment. He may be ‘asking for it’ > a less precious person.

    Given that, I think TR’s comment fits well. I don’t find his prolonged plots that disturbing, I love his draftsmanship, & there is no way I’m going to quit reading him. His worst sin, to me, is wasting a whole strip or Sunday spread on well drawn non-content, especially with Solange. Most cat strips are onerous, Luddy least of all.

    BTW, I love cats. Just had to give a difficult* one away, but think ‘he’ will be happier and do well there. *Yes, difficult despite a reduced level of testosterone.

    Supper time, have to get up early demain for volunteer work at the hospital. Peace, emb, 85 [today].

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  163. Happy birthday, Prof! May you have many more and make it another ten years at least to 95 or 100 as my mom intends to do. I keep thinking I will be 80 when she is 100 and we will both need caretakers.

    I am still planning to build a cottage in back yard but daughter may get superseded by need for caretaker.

    You are truly amazing with all you do and your mental acuity. It is no doubt that the “use it or lose it” applies to all we do in life!
    You are definitely using it,

    Love, Jackie

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  164. Happy birthday, emb.

    sandcastler(tm) I bet that woman’s thought process was probably like this line from an old Jerry Reed song: “if you can’t help me Lord, please don’t help that bear!”.

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  165. Last I heard my mom’s bear that was eating all her deer feed was pretty smart, he was not only taking out the deer feeder but the camera as well!

    Like Yogi Bear, “smarter than the average bear.”

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  166. By the way, when I was young we mostly ate venison, so I got pretty good at cooking it. However in college in one of my biology labs we were dissecting and making slides of some sort of worms that lived in the flesh and rather got me off on eating it.

    The price of meat in grocery lately has been more shocking than the price of gasoline. I am considering becoming a true vegetarian but mom will not go for a diet of dried beans and quinoa. She is suspicious of strange grains and will only eat white bread with no whole grain!

    Love, Jackie

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  167. Charles Manson, 80, and Afton Elaine Burton, 26, have been issued a marriage license and, according to the perspective bride, will marry next month.

    Following a very short honeymoon, the groom will return home to his cell at the California Department of Corrections to continue his career as a homicidal maniac and convicted mass murderer. The new bride will…ah, who cares?

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  168. I suspect it may be more a case of the 26-year-old wanting to be a Kartrashian-style “celebrity”.

    To me, the most disturbing thing about the story is that Manson is 80…and still living.

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  169. Saw the Manson wedding announcement too. What I remember was being in LA the day that happened and being so totally horrified by such a terrible murder(s). This woman is as insane as he must be or fascinated by evil? And why, pray tell, should he be allowed to marry at all?

    Please tell me they have at least rendered him incapable of reproducing!

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  170. A 26 [or 31] y.o. bride! What would I do with her, or she w/ me? A certain 50ish woman would make a good housemate, but she has a boyfriend. Peace, emb

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  171. Apparently, women either marrying or becoming romantically involved with homicidal monsters who are imprisoned for life without possibility of parole is not that uncommon. There must be a very special and awful kind of mental aberration in play there.

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  172. NK, Pooh was the “bear of little brain.” It was Yogi who was “smarter than the average bear.” Baloo had the “bare necessities” (some pun apparently intended) covered. And that is it for my bear knowledge… except for the one some 40 years ago on Andy Williams’ show who only wanted a cookie.

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  173. If we are going to talk trash celebrities I think the Honey Boo Boo/Mama June reality trash fest is hands down winner right now.
    Four children by four men, only it turns out it was actually three men, two of them child molesters of her own children. Have never seen the show but you can’t avoid their faces and news stories.

    When people watch this trash reality they encourage, fund and reward these people for their behavior, often making them wealthy in the process.

    The sad thing are the children who are victimized and used for the parents’ gain or celebrity. And yes, I’d probably say this applied to the Kardasians as well as the Honey Boo Boo bunch of kids.

    Love, Jackie

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  174. To me, the most disturbing thing about the story is that Manson is 80ā€¦and still living.

    Ghost, you got that right!! He is the perfect poster boy for why the death penalty is needed and why it should be applied as soon as possible when there is no longer any reasonable doubt.

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  175. Off to bed early for the elderly, especially those who took three Benadryl for their allergies! I always loved Yogi Bear and his sidekick was little Boo Boo which is probably what made me think of that annoying redneck reality show! He’d always outsmart the tourists and get their picnic basket, always in trouble with the park rangers.

    Was there a newspaper comic strip based on Yogi? I never watched that much television but I seem to remember him about same time as Bullwinkle and Rocky, Natasha and Boris?

    Falling asleep but at least I am not sneezing or my eyes tearing!

    Love, Jackie

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  176. The photo slide show has a number of photos of Manson where he looks especially demented. I had no sound on, just the photos and he looks so evil. I have long supported the death penalty but people get out of prison now long before they even serve the time they are committed for. And child sex offenses are seldom reported, tried or kept in prison. Rapes go unreported, untried.

    It seems we become numbed to crime and it becomes a subject for entertainment, something my husband and I disagree on unfortunately.

    Love, Jackie

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  177. No lectures on addiction to Benadryl but I take a lot of it! But only twice a day, when I get up and before I go to bed. For some reason my allergies are often worse in morning and I can’t get them to stop for anything. But I don’t keep taking it, take it just before bed to try to control overnight.

    I was born with horrible allergies and Benadryl was first thing I began taking back in mid 1950’s. And here it is 60 years later and I am still taking! A lot of allergy meds have stuff in them I cannot take, so Benadryl is fairly innocuous.

    No one will carry me to bed drunk, that is for sure! Haven’t had a drink of any kind for so long. Did I ever tell the story of my faithful assistant manager and I getting drunk on the Jack Daniels cake?

    Back in mid 80’s these were expensive cakes, an alternative to a customized fruit cake in price. Large size was about $40 and they were sold in gourmet shops, expensive candy shops. Large size had a pint of Jack Daniels poured into if I remember right after it was baked. We sold a lot of them, our best seller.

    So midnight Christmas Eve and she and I are closing down. There is one cake left. She was Baptist and I am dry by choice but we decide we are going to eat that last cake, we were exhausted and starved and we DESERVED to eat it!

    And got totally giggling drunk on the cake. Mike called to find out if I was coming home in time for Christmas and I was so hilariously drunk he was coming after us. He read the contents and asked if either of us had thought to see how much alcohol we were getting eating a cake? No.

    Love, Jackie

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  178. I make a mean rum cake (about the only baking I do, other than the occasional skillet of corn bread or loaf of beer bread) but I’m pretty sure all of the alcohol cooks out of the cake during the baking. Well, maybe not so much out of the butter-rum glaze that tops it. šŸ™‚

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  179. Good morning Villagers….

    Thank you Jerry, if there was a way, I’d ship ya a few flats of eggs šŸ˜‰ (There’s 30 to a flat)

    I can’t stand reality shows….

    Not much time…enjoyed reading all above…and that was a good one Evan.

    HAPPY DAY LATE BIRTHDAY EMB!!!!!!

    Manson is 80…and they make that news…..and the impending nuptials too.

    GR šŸ˜‰ AccuWeather is supposed to have its own channel sometime….must check into it.

    Jean…always loved Animaniacs….always thought it was above my little son’s head, as I was the only one who laughed.

    Ya’ll have a blessedly warm day…

    =^..^=

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  180. Hello officer. I’ll take $2.00 of regular and clean the windshield please.
    He’s 80, she’s 26. Couldn’t that be dangerous? If she dies, she dies. A joke that came over with Eric the Red.

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