Dream Boat III

When I was in the 9th grade, I wrote an essay in which I intended to use the word “wince.” However, I mistakenly employed the word “wench.” I can still see the bemused smile on the face of my teacher, Mrs. Singleton, when she gently corrected me. And this concludes the boat-dream sequence. I hope you have an enjoyable weekend.

 

42 thoughts on “Dream Boat III”

  1. Jimmy, are you a fan of “Yacht Rock?” It’s a musical genre set (but not rigidly) in the late 70s-early 80s, featuring mellow soft rock- the kind of stuff you could see yourself listening to while on a boat. Christopher Cross, Steely Dan, and Michael McDonald fit the bill well.

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  2. In about third grade, during our weekly music lesson where we’d sing songs written out on big flip charts, we were singing the Navy song “Anchors Aweigh” (we sang all the service hymns, interestingly). I was over-proud of my vocabulary and read “viscous” for “vicious”, belting out loudly “We’ll never change our course, So viscous foe steer shy-y-y-y!” As I recall, the teacher actually stopped the song to crack up.

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  3. Jimmy, great sequence to start a weekend. I laugh every time I see wench where it should read winch, especially in car ads where you get a power wench or a 1-ton wench.

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      • Which, of course, reminds me of an old joke, Mark.
        A flight attendant, on her first flight with a good-looking First Officer, was quite smitten with him. When she got on the elevator to go down to the lobby in the hotel where the crew was resting overnight, she found the FO there also. Taking advantage of the fact that the two of them were alone, she stood very close to him, smiled, and asked, ”How long has it been since you made love to a beautiful woman?”
        “Twenty-oh-five,” he replied.
        “Oh my goodness!” she exclaimed, taken aback. “That long ago?”
        “Well,” he said, glancing at his watch, “it’s only twenty-one-hundred-hours now.”

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  4. Mr. Ed’s, a gas sta. + café in Motley, MN, used to have hot gizzards on its salad bar. Mr. Ed sold it & retired, it became some other café for a few yr., is now defunct. Thanks for adding the és. Peace,

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  5. The standard joke in sailing is “the wench on the winch” often illustrated with the wench in a bikini with no rear fabric or less bending over a shiny winch..

    Bikini never has top, potential for injury there due to large surface contact burns.

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  6. This week marked the passing of the last of Jackie’s “big dog” rescues, (NOT Dickens, I hasten to add) of which the total count was 10 at one time. This one was raised from pup (we believe she was about 15 years old) and was a beautiful dog with a great personality. The loss of a pet is always a hard thing.
    RIP, Voodoo. You were a good girl.

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  7. I miss them all. I had far more than 10 dogs in years I lived in Oklahoma but had ten “house dogs” at one time ranging from 130# to 40#, they had distinctive personalities and were wonderful characters, jockeying for a place in my office, bed and my hesrt.

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  8. By the way, we were discussing prescriptions here a few days ago. And something has come up that I want to mention with mine. After my annual lab tests by the VA my doctor placed me on a vitamin C supplement and one for iron. He added these to my VA supplied prescriptions and I didn’t think much about it till they arrived. Both were over the counter versions that I could have bought myself. When this month’s bill for them arrived I found I was being charged $24 for 200 of the Vitamin C tablets and $24 for 300 of the iron supplement. I have looked online and found I could buy a bottle of 250 of the same strength Vitamin C at Walmart for $5.94 plus tax, and I could get the iron from Amazon for about $15 plus tax. I wonder why the physician didn’t just give me directions what to buy and let me get my own? I would be saving over $30 that way, and I will go that route when these run out.

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  9. Mark
    Prescriptions sometimes are covered by insurance & are deductible — OTC are not.
    But go with the one that saves the most money – all things being equal.

    Just finished “Spearhead” about The Third Armor – thanks to whomever recommended it.
    A page turner. Also gruesome – It is no wonder why they are called the Greatest Generation.

    A friend I am sure knew Bob Earley – though it is too late to ask either.

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    • I’m in an income range that requires me to pay a copay for services from the VA. And I’ve noticed that over the counter items I could get cheaply for myself cost considerably more if the VA sends them to me. So I have requested some things be taken off my list with the VA so they don’t send me those things. And sometimes the quality isn’t what it should be, as happened when the local VA switched from a US name brand insulin needle to a foreign import. They might be saving money, but the needles weren’t nearly as sharp as they should be. I ended up buying my own from Amazon. I never paid attention to whether they were cheaper, but they are certainly much better.

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  10. Mark: Based on personal experience, I believe that most physicians, PA’s, and NP’s are sensitive to what their patients have to pay out of pocket…but some are not, for whatever reason. Never hurts to ask them about it when situations such as that arise.

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    • My physician and PA are very responsive to what I need. But they don’t know what the VA is going to bill for pharmacy items. When the Dr. in Alabama put me on low dose aspirin it was the same way. When the VA sent it to me the copay was about 5 times higher than the over the counter price in Walmart. So I never ordered it from the VA after that first shipment.

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    • The Cars were one of my favorite bands in my college days. You get used to the older musicians dying, but it starts to really hit home when the groups that rose to prominence in one’s youth start dying by natural causes.

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  11. I went to the local pizza place to pick up my order and someone else had picked it up. I asked the clerk if she knew if they had paid for mine. They were sincerely embarrassed and gave me a nice discount on my order because i had a nice attitude about it. I sat next to a guy with whom we shared a bunch a jokes together and made the best of a bad situation. After he picked up his order, and I started to scroll Facebook.

    I found out that one of my friends, Chuck Bavis, had passed away. This friend was 7 foot tall and led his HS team pretty far in the tournament. He then went to star at Purdue. In his first game, in the opening of Purdue’s current arena, he held then Lew Alcindor to 17 points and Purdue only lost by one to UCLA. In 1969 he and Rick Mount led Purdue to the Final game, but Chuck had gotten hurt and was unable to play and Purdue got killed by UCLA. The next year Chuck got in an accident and lost part of his foot and had to give up the game.
    Via Facebook, I realized that Chuck was a gentle giant. I felt embarrassed to tell him that he was one of my heroes growing up, but after getting to know him, I was glad that he was. As we get older, many of our friends die and it is not just the person, but the era that dies. There are not a lot of athletes like Chuck anymore, but I am sure glad that I got to know him.

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  12. Mark
    I know about dull needles.
    When I was in Induction Center getting shots – medic hit my arm with needle
    and it did not go in. Second whack was harder. He threw that needle away. Back when
    needles were sterilized and reused. (Or maybe just reused)

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    • I’ve had a couple of cases where the vacuum seal was broken in the syringe they used for blood draws. It won’t pull anything out, so they have to dispose of it and try again. I hate when that happens. As for the insulin needles, I’m not Superman so when I press the syringe firmly and the needle won’t penetrate the skin I know where the problem is.

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  13. When I go in for my annual bloodwork every year (yes, I realize that is redundant), I’m always mildly interested to see how many vacuum tubes the phlebotomist lines up on the chair arm. No, they don’t stick me that many times, they just keep changing out the tube while the needle is still in my vein. But as an eight-gallon blood donor, I’ve had worse done to me.

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