Egging ’em on

It turns out, 20 years later, that eggs aren’t bad for you after all—or bacon either if it isn’t highly processed, but that kind of bacon is hard to come by. It isn’t often you see this many people in an A&J strip! Maybe that will make a good theme for us here this week: other people in Arlo & Janis. To be honest, I’ll have to think about that one.

Buy the new book, "Beaucoup Arlo & Janis!"Today's "Arlo & Janis!"

185 thoughts on “Egging ’em on”

  1. How about featuring strips which include the neighbors? Like the one where Arlo and Janis are walking past the couple who grin at them. And Janis says “I told you they could see in the windows”.

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  2. Jimmy, so do you, say, take a head shape and pop different hairstyles on it? Or do you think of a new character as a whole? I suppose Walt Kelly thought of a personality for every character, walk-on or more important. I further suppose you picture them in your mind before you draw them. (I can’t picture anything in my mind, a condition newly-known as “afantasia.”)

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  3. The “eggs aren’t bad for you” change from last fall was not any new science. It was a change of votes by a committee, and was definitely not unanimous. The egg marketing organizations made sure that the change was highly publicized.

    I’m sure little Meg is very happy though.

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  4. Mark, that’s only one way that eagles deal with turtles. They also drop them on rocks to break their shells. In fact, Aeschylus is said to have been killed in Sicily when an eagle mistook his bald head for a rock and got a bulls eye with its dinner.

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  5. Arlo’s remark was likely no less inane than what the other three were discussing. Seriously, people, how significant is 99% of conversation conducted standing up, at a party, with a drink in one’s hand?

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  6. Eggs? I recently had a dietician take a group of us vets on a shopping tour of a grocery story and stop at the egg section and told us not to forget the eggs. She mentioned that eggs were a great source of protein in moderation.

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  7. I think the record for an A&J strip featuring total number of individual people drawn within would be the Sunday strip for 12/11/1988. It is unfortunately not available at the online archive. I do not remember where I first saw it; it might have been on a page of this blog. It had a total of seventeen other people besides Arlo and Janis. It was, naturally, another party… and apparently one at the Days’ own home.

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  8. Mark: Thanks for yesterday’s and today’s posts. Going through raptor pellets and their trash heaps has always been a favorite activity. Several times have taken a bunch of owl pellets to elementary classes for the kids to dissect, with reference skulls for comparison. Seems to me there are a few fossilized sites of ancient [last few MY] pellets and scats containing prey items.

    Also, dung heaps of giant ground sloths in caves in the SW have been gold mines / ancient [mostly Pleistocene] climatic change as evidenced by pollen grains accidentally ingested by the beasts. One of BSU’s late lamented alumnae, Dr. Francis Bartos King*, got her master’s and doctorate in palynology, studying pollen grains in anthropological sites of early humans, mostly in the eastern US. She and a roommate lived with us two years, ’68-’70.

    *a search might yield some citations.

    Peace,

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  9. My mom was a country cook from around the Mammoth Cave area.

    Chicken fried in bacon grease. Salt-cured, hickory smoked ham and eggs fried in the grease. Everything in a cast-iron skillet, of course.

    Pure heaven. How I miss those meals.

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  10. For Debbe (and relevant to today’s topic!)
    https://scontent.ford1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/fr/cp0/e15/q65/13138820_608171412680389_4474569750390684425_n.jpg?efg=eyJpIjoibCJ9&oh=f36fa3a4411be8255e69ecb81cc00ec7&oe=57E29155

    You’d think I’d be used to the lack of sleep by now. Four hours. After a twelve-hour work day, it was off to the polls. At ten of six, they ushered everyone inside; the line was still to the end of the sidewalk. Good thing schools have long hallways. Finally got to hold my ballot a full hour after the poll had closed. Off to bed.

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  11. Dear Mindy, bless you for what you, and the others, endured for the sake of democracy! I was thinking of you today, believe it or not, as I knew Indiana would be voting. My best hopes that you can catch up on lost sleep.

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  12. Well, it’s official…I have the biggest unit in the neighborhood.*

    And I went to see my P&PHS*** today.**

    * The HVAC guys came and installed a new AC unit today. What did you think?
    ** These two comments are not related.
    *** For those of you wondering (as well as for those of you not wondering), had the short, empire-waisted dress P&PHS was wearing today been just a bit more flimsy, it could have easily passed for one of Janis’s black nighties.

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  13. If you have recently died call us immediately . We may be able to get you 39 cents off your next order of whatever it was that killed you. Call now. Time is limited.

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  14. Jackie, as P&PHS was trimming my salt-and-pepper hair today, she said, “If I were to ever go gray…which I won’t…I’d want my hair to look exactly like yours.” Based on that, and some comments you’ve made, I’m guessing you’d like it, too.

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  15. Yes, I love salt and pepper hair and beards. Or gray.

    Interesting, I don’t color my hair. Sort of a ash blonde. According to my hair dressers I will never need to, just get more ashen.

    Interesting medical visit today, first time I ever filled out form that asked about relationship issues and sexual orientation. A comprehensive form. I was impressed.

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  16. Mark
    If your mother is at all unsteady on here feet she should have someone with her.
    But then all it takes is a few min.
    MIL was alone less than an hour when she fell. Which we probably could not
    have prevented anyway.
    If other family members take over primary supervision make sure you give them a
    break (a day and a night) once a week or every other week so they can relax.
    That was how BH and I were able to watch MIL without burnout.

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  17. Good morning Villagers…

    Steve, yes, everyone should eat more eggs…..I need a raise 🙂

    I’ve been told there is more of a demand for the by-product of eggs…our eggs are used for that, such as Sara Lee and Milky Way candy bars….seen a rig with the name Milky Way on it coming from the direction of The Corp.

    Rick, your mom cooked like mine did…always had a tin coffee can full of bacon grease she used for seasoning veggies and such.

    Mindy, I would love to have that sign in my packing room….thanks for the grin.

    Mark, my mom was prone to falling….we finally got her a walker with wheels and it had a seat on it. She also had one leg shorter than the other due to a faulty knee replacement. Had to have special shoes made for her. Old Bear has given excellent advice. At the nursing home, they had an alarm that would go off whenever she would try to get out of bed on her own. I know what you are going through and a prayer is on its way……………Amen

    Well, a new motor for my packer came in and it had less wires on it than the old motor….I left.

    Husband ordered a new radiator for my ‘Zuzi’, I hope we can get it all put together by this weekend. I’m going nuts. They pulled the dent out of the bumper and grill, now something about the a/c…told them I don’t need the a/c. Need pins for the hood and a latch.

    Happy Hump Day

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  18. Debbe:

    Thanks for jogging my memory!

    My mom also used a coffee can for the bacon grease.

    She favored Chase & Sanborn, so those cans were a frequent feature all over the place.

    Dad used them for nuts, bolts, and other things for his basement workbench.

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  19. Old Bear and Debbe, thank you for the advice and for the memory of coffee cans full of drippings. When I was little, my mom and dad favored Chase and Sanborn too. I don’t recall either grandmother or mother cooking with the grease. They just threw the cans away as they got full.

    If mom goes to brother to stay, she will have plenty of company. Brother stays home while his wife works, she will be retiring within a year, I think. My nephew Joe, his girlfriend and their baby daughter also live with brother. Mom has complained she doesn’t get to see the baby, so now’s her chance.

    Have a great day, everybody.

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  20. Lord, I have so much to do today. How do I get so far behind? I lose ground while I sleep! Oh right, yesterday I got to meet that new doctor and find out I have one less body part to worry about.

    Same body part our possible presidential candidate considered most important on our possible first lady. That’s about as political a comment as you’ll get from me. Ironic.

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  21. Said “possible presidential candidate” today seems more than just “possible”.

    I’ll not comment on “possible first lady” lady parts.

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  22. A somewhat historic day in the Tampa Bay area. The Tampa Tribune stopped publication with yesterday’s edition being the last of the daily paper after 121 years. The paper was purchased by the Tampa Bay Times (nee St. Petersburg times) for an undisclosed amount. The last sale of the Tribune was 2012 when it fetched nine million.

    This has been a long awaited shoe to drop. In the 1980’s after the death of Times publisher Nelson Poynter, the St. Petersburg Times went after other local papers aggressively. Mr. Poynter had always respected other publications’ markets.

    The Clearwater Sun fell first and fast. The St. Petersburg Times built an office directly across the street from the Sun. A large noisy helix windmill was erected on top of the new building presumably to generate power but in reality to drive the staff of the Sun crazy with the whoop, whoop sounds.

    The Times moved into downtown Tampa soon after. It bought the naming rights for Tampa’s sports arena (which recently became Amalie Arena.) Most of the Times staff and management was moved to the new Tampa facility. The Tribune retaliated by building an office in Pinellas County, not in St. Petersburg but a suburb north of town, too little, too late.

    In 2012, the St. Petersburg Times was changed to the Tampa Bay Times, something that was to happen years before but the Tribune owned the name “Tampa Times” which ceased publication in 1982. (I delivered the afternoon Tampa Times in the early 1960’s). The court ruling denying use of the name, “Times” expired in 2012.

    I grew up in an era when you just subscribed to your local paper, period. The son of the Tribune’s editorial manager sat in front of me through junior and senior high school (Dudley Clendinen, RIP http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/01/us/dudley-clendinen-author-dies-at-67.html?_r=0). He became a well known writer and editor but never worked at his father’s paper. He did work for the St. Petersburg times in his early career. That should have been a clue as to the declining quality of the Tribune.

    As a subscriber to the Tampa Bay Times, I’m pleased that the paper will pick up all the comics from the Tribune that are not already seen in the Times. The daily A&J will now be available to me, Yay! If cartoonists are paid by circulation, J.J. will get a raise.

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  23. Ghost Sweetie, I am officially jealous! Our a/c is still not working, and the guy had to order a part, which MIGHT be in on Thursday, so he MIGHT be out here Friday. Thankfully the weather has been a bit cooler and somewhat rainy the last few days so opening windows helps.

    I still have a can for bacon grease, but I keep it in the fridge and use it sparingly. Mostly I put it in cornbread instead of the fourth cup of cooking oil called for in the recipe I read long, long ago. Tastes much better. 🙂

    As I believe I have mentioned before, my once-auburn hair is now pretty much all white, and I have never bothered to try to color it. Recently, though, I have thought of putting a streak in it, as a friend of mine does. She is a blonde, and her streak changes from pink to blue to green, depending on her mood. Or maybe the seasons. I just haven’t decided on a color yet. Of course, I could try this:

    http://fashionbossip.com/top-20-best-multi-color-looks-that-take-rainbow-hair-to-the-next-level/

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  24. When I was a teen in college I was a hair model for an avant garde hair dresser, which surprises no one. I have had hair of many colors but none like today’s styles. I have had white, pink, blue, red, black. The baby blue landed me in a blue silk dress and a bank of azaleas on front page of paper.

    But a colored streak Trapper says you are still young in spirit, so go for it.

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  25. Jean dear, here’s hoping for a quick resolution of your AC problems. And ironically, the unseasonably cool weather here means I really didn’t need AC yesterday, and probably won’t today, either. The HVAC guys apologized for the three and a half days (two of them over the weekend) it took to replace the unit, but as I told them, it could have been much worse…it isn’t August yet. And I’m sure you’d look equally elegant and lovely with auburn hair, white hair, or something a bit less traditional. And I agree a “streak” may be the way to go. (All the examples in the link you posted seemed to me to be a bit of chromatic overkill, though.)

    Jackie, you’ve had non-traditional hair colors? I’m shocked, shocked, I tell you! 🙂 Perhaps you and Lady Mindy should compare notes on hair colors.

    Last night I was reflecting on the fact that three of my grandparents had snow white hair, my mom and dad and all their siblings had/have snow white hair, and only my paternal grandmother had hardly any gray in her dark hair when she died at age 85. And yet it appears it will be a long time, if ever, before I go completely gray, and my sister (two years younger than me) had almost no gray when she passed. Funny how that genetics thing works, isn’t it?

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  26. Since my mom and all her siblings were brunettes, dark, dark, as was my maternal grandmother and great grandparents and aunts and uncles, where did my ash blonde hair come from? My father I never met although my mother died telling me he bleached it, just like I once did.

    Who knew good looking men in the 19 40s bleached their hair?

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  27. Jackie, I seem to recall seeing movies portraying 1950s male HS students with peroxide-bleached hair, so that could have been a thing in the ’40s as well.

    When Pneumatic & Pulchritudinous Hair Stylist and I were discussing hair color yesterday, she told me she’d once had a male client who wanted her to color his hair a uniform silver gray and how she had gone about doing it.

    GR6: “That’s different.”

    P&PHS: “He had a girlfriend he wanted to impress.”

    GR6: “An older girlfriend?”

    P&PHS: “Yep.”

    GR6: “Damned if I’d ever do that.”

    P&PHS: “You wouldn’t have to.”

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  28. Jeez, I was about to say silver hair wasn’t necessary. My late husband had beautiful silver hair, as do many of Portuguese descent. I should have been suspicious when he started coloring it since the silver didn’t bother me.

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  29. Debbe 😉 Technically, I didn’t forget your tune last night, I just fell asleep in my recliner before I posted it and when I woke up at some ridiculous hour in the middle of the night, all I could manage was to stagger off to bed. (I’m sure you can’t imagine what that’s like.) Consider me mortified, self-chastised, and suitably contrite.

    At least I never stutter when I call someone “Baby”.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cia_v4vxfE

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  30. Lora, I have your beautiful iris painting hanging in my bedroom to my left. My favorite flowers,, along with hydrangeas. Purples I love but it is the flowers that bring back the wonderful memories of my grandmother’s irises.

    Thank you so much for sharing your gift. The check is in the mail and that is no joke. Love, Jackie Monies

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  31. Favorite flower? What comes to mind often is bird’s foot trefoil. Small but exquisite, common on moist roadsides, good N2-fixer [intro from Eurasia]. Peace,

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  32. emb

    Dare I admit I have several Hooked on LPs but from RCA not K-tel.
    It must be the THUMP-THUMP-THUMP.

    Have a feeling the colorful hair looks better in photos than real life – especially
    after a few days.

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  33. Today’s A&J
    I have been told it is against the law to interfere with a drone – but if one were
    to be harassing me (over my own property) I would tend to ask forgiveness
    rather than permission.

    My fathers uncle demonstrated the resolution of crow eyesight when my father
    was a lad in the old country.
    Taking a broom and holding it as a rifle he stepped out of the house – no reaction.
    Taking a rifle and holding it as a broom – all kinds of alarm.

    While my brother & I were hand throwing skeet -many years ago – a crow made a turn just a little out of shotgun range, made an arc then continued on his original flight path. Impressive.

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  34. Good morning Villagers….

    Can’t remember the coffee brand Mom and Dad, probably Folgers….as I am a Folgers girl, dark columbian flavor is how I jump start my day. And I save the plastic containers, take some to work to store ‘stuff’ in.

    Anyone remember George Carlin’s take on ‘Too Much Stuff”? Must look that up, too funny, I remember.

    Old Bear, you reminded me of a memory of my Uncle Ron (may he rest in peace) skeet shooting in the back yard of Mom and my Stepdad’s homestead.

    Jerry, honk your horn as you pass through Indiana 🙂

    Jean, those are some wicked hair colors….go for it. Loved the cotton candy one.

    Mark…that sounds like a win, win situation.

    Ya’ll have a blessed day…..

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  35. Awwwwww 🙂 Good ones, Debbe- thanks!
    Had not realized sharpness of crows. wow.
    Jackie, I’m very glad you are happy with the artwork.
    Jerry- layers. As the weather warms (if it does) you can peel off clothes and still be comfortable.
    “hunk on Walnut” fluff the hair…. lol Jimmy! Now to today’s laughs……..

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  36. The last time I read an article about “drones” (the unarmed, domestic versions), about half the respondents seemed to be of the “I own the air over my property for as far as my shotgun can shoot and I’ll shoot down anything that invades my airspace that I damn well please” school of thought. I’m certainly happy that, back in the day, I never passed over the property of any of them, flying pipeline patrol in a Cessna at altitudes lower than many “drones” fly, while their spouse happened to be sunbathing au naturel in the backyard.

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  37. From Wikipedia: The law, in balancing the public interest in using the airspace for air navigation against the landowner’s rights, declared that a landowner controls use of the airspace above their property in connection with their uninterrupted use and enjoyment of the underlying land. In other words, a person’s real property ownership includes a reasonable amount of the private airspace above the property in order to prevent nuisance. A landowner may make any legitimate use of their property that they want, even if it interferes with aircraft overflying the land.”[5]
    The low cost of unmanned aerial vehicles in the 2000s revived legal questions of what activities were permissible at low altitude.[6] The FAA reestablished that public, or navigable, airspace is the space above 500 feet[7]

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  38. Except, I hasten to add, that the FAA may issue wavers for aircraft to operate below 500 Above Ground Level when not taking off or landing, which is how I could routinely and legally fly below 200 AGL while patrolling pipeline right-of-ways. Small comfort, though, if Bubba had decided he didn’t like me flying over his AGL pool while his sweetie Darla Mae was floating on a raft wearing her itsy-bitsy teeny-weeny yellow polka dot bikini (or less) and broke out his trusty 12 gauge Remington Express 870 duck gun. 🙂

    Also, it seems the FAA has now claimed jurisdiction over airspace right down to the ground; otherwise they wouldn’t be able to regulate UAV operating in that airspace, which they now in fact do.

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  39. Arlo’s “skeet” shooting form is pretty much OK, except for closing his left eye. Why give up a large percentage of your vision and situational awareness by closing one eye? Of course, it’s still better than closing *both* eyes, which I suspect some folks do. 🙂

    Remember The Pioneer Woman Defending the Ranch House™ in all those old Western movies? She’d point a musket in the general direction of a bad guy on a galloping horse fifty feet away; close her eyes and fire; and knock him right out of the saddle.

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  40. Saw a clip from a movie sev. yrs. ago where a woman with a pistol kills 3 mobsters in a moving car, and saves the kid therein. Sort of like the French Resistance woman in Pibgorn. Peace,

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  41. My favorite scene in “Miller’s Crossing” (one of my favorite gangster movies) was the one where Leo took out several rival mobsters sent to assassinate him (including some firing at him as they try to flee in a sedan), using a Thompson M1928 “Tommy Gun” with a 100-round drum magazine, while “Danny Boy” plays in the background.

    Of course, he fired at least 500 rounds from that magazine without reloading but hey, that’s Hollywood for you.

    http://mountainx.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/millers4.jpg

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  42. It was 35 years ago today that my mom was killed in a car accident, thanks to a not-sufficiently-attentive driver. The driver was a friend, doing a favor by driving mom to the hospital to fetch my dad, who had been released. The crash was right in front of the hospital. When dad heard the hubbub and mom didn’t arrive, he knew….

    To those villagers facing the loss of a parent – or who have already lost same – I still don’t know whether a swift loss is better than a slow decline. Given that all humans must die, I can see benefits/detriments to each course of events.

    On a brighter note, my nephew’s wife – who has had a LOT of problems getting pregnant and staying so – just had an ultrasound and it shows what certainly seems to be a well-formed child. Yay! They do have one child already, thanks to IVF and a lot of health care, so this will be a second. Hard to imagine the $$$$$$ involved for all the cyclic attempts; it would not surprise me to hear it topped $200K.

    Pax vobiscum.

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  43. Speaking of “Awwwww” (and Debbe and Llee were), I had to make an early afternoon run to the Post Office and passed one of the large downtown churches where a pre-school class and their two teachers were headed across a parking lot for, I suppose, a field trip. The brightly dressed four-year-olds were marching in-trail between their teachers, each of them holding onto the tail of the t-shirt of the child in front with both their little hands. They reminded me of a line of baby ducks, and they were so disgustingly cute I just had to say “Awwwww!”

    And I’m not even an “Awwwww!” kind of guy.

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  44. The discussion of airspace reminds me of the controversy on the beaches where “land” owners want to fence off all of the beach behind their house right out to the water and prevent anyone from walking on “their” beach. Large condos have fences from building to building and security guards that will prevent you from walking through their parking lot. No one should have ever been allowed to build on the beach and eventually they even moved the road away from the beach so that you can’t even drive along and look at the beach. It’s the golden rule. Them with the gold makes the rules. Debbe, I’m not looking at my schedule but I think that will probably be about Friday. I hope that all of your girls are staying healthy. The talk of guns reminds me of a western, I think that one of the stars was Val Kilmer. He was shooting everything in sight and turned to the camera. You could see right through the empty chambers of his six gun.

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  45. Today is Cinco de Mayo, which celebrates the Mexican Army’s victory over French Army units at the Battle of Puebla on this date in 1862. On paper, the Mexicans should not have won. But it was, after all, the French Army.

    Enjoy your tacos and enchiladas. And no, that’s not “cultural appropriation”, whatever the hell that is supposed to be.

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  46. Mark, same in Texas, although defined as “mean low water” to the dune grass line. Beach house owners take a strong interest in dune preservation, because as the dune line moves, so does your property line.

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  47. Mark, I think that you are correct on the movie. This is not Hawaii. It’s the Redneck Riviera and the above referenced Golden Rule trumps everything else.

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  48. The state of Oregon, to my knowledge, owns the coast, I suspect at least to high water line. In places, it’s more than a mile to the ocean, in areas dominated by sand dunes. Unfortunately, I think more than enough dune buggies and such are allowed to damage some areas.

    In ’62, while I was attending a U.O. marine biology summer session [8 wks.], we 5 spent most weekends camping, often in state parks right on the coast. Only time I’ve ever seen a pine marten in the wild, right there in the path that wound its way from the campground out to the dunes.

    Good summer program, good summer overall. Peace,

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  49. I have had small boat sailing friends, especially in Everglades Challenge, capsize, wash ashore and be arrested by wealthy home owners, while others have been taken in, helped and treated wonderfully.

    Having said that I hate the wall to wall development Florida allowed.

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  50. On a bad day you can always say something about the gub’mint. I wonder how thick my file is. I’m going to the

    On a bad day you can always say something about the gub’mint. I wonder how thick my file is. I’m going to the

    white House in September. I wonder if they’ll let me in.

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  51. I promise not to come in with a rocket backpack or on some kind of motorized flying kite. You guys do have a sense of humor don’t you? (THE BALANCE OF THIS COMMENT HAS BEEN REMOVED.)

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  52. Jerry – I think it depends on which part of the government is standing in front of you. I suspect there is a section the Secret Service entrance test geared solely to weed out those with a funny bone. (The alphabet agencies are too big and cumbersome to worry about humor. If they don’t like you, they just bury you in paperwork.) 🙂

    Yes Jackie, it was my birthday (38). That is about the best I can say for the day.

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  53. Good morning Villagers….

    Well, a very happy, belated birthday Indy Mindy 🙂 Your 38th!! Why, you still have Pablum on your breath child……we love you girl.

    Old Bear…haven’t tried in a couple of days. My email is through my IPS, or is it ISP, and it’s called Pronto. Takes so long for it to download and I don’t have the patience. Asked Ian if I could bring it up on his lap top, he said yes…may try it after work today….if I can peel myself out of the recliner.

    Last night was horrific…this whole ordeal revolving around my ‘Zuzi’ is just snow balling out of this world…they tried to pull out a dent in the frame with the Danger Ranger. This place was a ‘flippin’ madhouse. My one nephew-in-law is buying husband’s Intrepid, and it ‘conked’ out in the drive through at McD’s yesterday…had to have it towed….and it’s his Danger Ranger we are driving…oh, the madness…

    And it’s Payday….

    later…..

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  54. Curmudgeonly, I feel your pain. My mom was taken in an accident due to a driver that was high and I don’t believe that the police ever charged him with anything. It happened the day after my 2nd wedding anniversary, so always makes it bittersweet. I loved my Mom and she continues to love and look after me to this day. Happy Mother’s Day to the Moms out there and I hope everyone honors Mom somehow this weekend.

    On a brighter note, my son and I have entered a 10K and 5K tomorrow. They both start at the same time, so with my bionic hip, my son should pass me before I finish. My daughter ran cross country in HS and usually brought up the rear, but while she was in college she developed herself and eventually became a personal trainer. She is coming in tonight and will run the 10K too. I have no doubt that my son, who just ran Boston, will win the 10K, but I think that my daughter has a chance to win her first race. That would be cool if it were to happen.

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  55. Steve, You don’t run on that new hip, do you? When wife got a new knee, which worked beautifully for the 3 yr. she used it, they told her No Running and No Dancing [she used to dance in Diane’s Dance Studio, which is celebrating its 50th anniv. later this mo.]. Daughter is coming home from Chicagoland for that. Have to clean out guestroom [wife’s old office, where the dormant TV is].

    Peregrines don’t build a nest, but they do feather it: mostly pigeon and starling, I think. The lump on the ledge is a new hairball [featherball in these birds]. I’ve taken apart scores of same from various raptors, but just saw one coughed up for the first time. I think it was the tercel, but he and the falcon never pose side-by-side.

    http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/peregrine-falcon-webcam

    Which reminds me, today’s A.W.A.D. word is ‘refect.’

    Peace

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  56. I missed yesterday as I was off at several medical offices getting CT scanned and breathing tested (yeah, still breathing!) and then visiting with the pulmonary doc. He’s a nice guy as well as a very good doctor, so I don’t mind our visits too much.

    Happy Belated Birthday, Mindy!! Hope your day was lovely!

    As to the hair, no, I’m not going for the full-head polychrome look. I don’t have the patience for that. One streak will suit me, if I can just decide on a color.

    Jackie, the odd part about my hair right from the start is that I have read articles by geneticists that a man with black hair and a woman with red hair WILL NOT have babies with red hair, but my black-haired father and red-haired mother did it twice. My sister also has red hair. And, until my hair went white it was two toned by nature. The under hair on the back of my head was ash blonde, not the same auburn as the rest. It made for interesting up-dos.

    Oh, and Mindy, this is where the rest of us go:

    http://www.marietta.com/attractions/the-big-chicken

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  57. EMP:

    My running is very minimal and tomorrow will be more like a shuffle/walk. I walk 3.5 miles 5 days a week and do very little running as that pounding and shock to the hips is not a good thing. . My personal physician approved of my plan to walk a marathon last month as the benefits of moving verses not moving are much greater. Being an experienced and very cautious runner he told me that I would probably not do anything stupid. I would like to believe that he is right. I have met guys that continue to run after a hip replacement and silently wonder when the replacement of the replacement will be.

    To be honest, if I don’t feel right tomorrow, I’ll stop and watch my son and daughter finish along with my 3 month old Grandson.

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  58. Meet the thirty-eight-year-old Lady Mindy. Same as the thirty-seven-year-old Lady Mindy. Happy Birthday, child. 🙂

    Jean dear, here’s a thought…do a streak that’s the same as your original auburn color.

    I seem to recall reading in an article a decade or so ago that some geneticists predicted that in the not too distant future no more redheads will be born since the recessive gene that produces red hair would “die out”. I believe that theory has been discredited, but I understand the same prediction is being made again, this time being blamed on, wait for it, wait for it, global climate change.

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  59. Whether a gene [an allele] is recessive or dominant, by itself, has nothing to do with whether it ‘dies out.’ How well it works at producing healthy, REPRODUCING offspring in a particular environment is what counts. E.g., among the ABO [Landsteiner] blood group genes [Ia, Ib, and i], i is recessive to both Ia and Ib, but is the most common among Caucasians, and therefore, O [ii] is our most common blood type, and most type A and type B people are Ia-i and Ib-i. [The allele i confers some resistance to smallpox, maybe only in the double dose, ii, type O.]

    Both wife and I were ii, and all of our kids are ii. At a site on another chromosome sit the alleles for either Rh+ [R] or Rh- [r]. I am Rh+ [R?] and wife was Rh- [rr]. So I said [in lecture] I married her to find out if I was RR or Rr. Our elder son is Rh- [rr]. He got one r from her and the other from me, so I must be Rr. I’m doing this on the OH projector, with squares for males and circles for females, so I draw another line and square, and say, ‘This is our second son; what’s his Landsteiner blood type?’ Some student correctly says, ‘Type O.’ One year I spontaneously muttered, ‘Better be type O,’ and brought down the house. Used it through retirement. I miss the classroom.

    If the allele for red hair also causes light skin, it could be selected against if such people, in a warmer climate, expose more skin to sunlight and therefore are more susceptible to skin cancer. BUT, most people will do their reproducing before they succumb to skin ca. If so, it still won’t be selected against, unless people avoid marrying redheads. Wife and I were both redheads, and she had her tubes tied after kid 3. [Since sex is for reproduction only, we then stopped having sex, right?] Pax vobiscum,

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  60. Ghost, somehow I do not think that Freud would have interpreted this dream from Genesis 40 the same way Joseph did…

    9 So the chief cupbearer told Joseph his dream. He said to him, “In my dream I saw a vine in front of me,
    10 and on the vine were three branches. As soon as it budded, it blossomed, and its clusters ripened into grapes.
    11 Pharaoh’s cup was in my hand, and I took the grapes, squeezed them into Pharaoh’s cup and put the cup in his hand.”
    12 “This is what it means,” Joseph said to him. “The three branches are three days.
    13 Within three days Pharaoh will lift up your head and restore you to your position, and you will put Pharaoh’s cup in his hand, just as you used to do when you were his cupbearer.”

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  61. Lost, usually above the high tide mark. Only tourists walk barefooted on the beach or close to the water. We know what glass, metal, tar, etc. is hiding in that sand. When they talk about the “sugar white beaches” those days are long gone. When I was a kid it really was pure white and it squeaked when you walked on it.

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  62. If you want a nice beach go to Mexico Beach. It’s not in Mexico. Look on a map south of Tallahassee. No go karts, goofy golf, drunk college kids, expensive condos, just a nice beach.

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  63. Today’s strip (05.06.16):

    Arlo mentioned the CIA’s ability to read license plates from satellites. I first heard about that sometime around 1982 or 83 when I was a grad student at The Ohio State – over 30 years ago.

    Now, I suspect that they satellites that can read business cards while they are in our wallets.

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  64. As for the sunbathing file, I suspect that it is stored with the photos from the full-body scanners in airports.

    You know the ones I’m talking about. The ones that aren’t supposed to capture images and are supposed to blur all the naughty bits.

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  65. Arlo: “It’s really difficult for the law to keep up with the pace of technology.”

    That is much like the local police, the FBI, the Justice Department, and the military.

    They are more often than not there after the event.

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  66. Dang Ghost, great start to morning, not! I just had fantastic breakfast of vegetarian mushroom, spinach, fresh tomatoes, goat cheese, pesto and desert of fresh fruit.

    Going to a rose show, Botanical gardens, park festival and seafood dinner spot. Good times.

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  67. Well the expected rain never came and we had a nice race. My son, Dan, ran a 36:53.3 in the 10K and led wire to wire. Fortunately the police car in front of him turned on his bubble lights several times as locals were not expecting to see a bunch of runners. I told him that it is every father’s dream to see their son chasing a police car and not vice versa. My daughter came in from Chicago and ran the 10K as well. We were finally all able to run together, which was great.

    I ran/walked the 5K and felt pretty good. Very light on my feet with no pounding on the joints. I would walk for a minute at a time then lightly run for about 2 minutes. At the end we finished on a track and I noticed that my calf was starting to cramp up. That rarely ever happened before. It still hurts this afternoon, but I’ve been drinking a lot of fluids and hoping that it goes away.

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  68. Steve from Royal Oak, nice going with the race. A special occasion, for sure, having your son and daughter running in the same race! I hope the cramp fades away soon.

    Jackie, I hope your rose show was enjoyable and the weather was nice for it.

    Dear Mindy, I wish you didn’t have to get up so early. What a pain.

    Best wishes to all the Villagers for a nice Mothers Day tomorrow.

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  69. GR6 @12:06
    Not publicly
    Come to think of it they might figuratively.

    Steve
    Try dill pickle juice, 2 fingers maybe 3 in a juice glass.
    Don’t know how it works, it seems under a min. Both fingers and
    calves.

    Just had a piece of Tillamook “Special Reserve” Extra Sharp Cheddar
    needs a nice sharp Red to go with it. It is a “nibbling” cheese. Little pieces at a time only.

    Jackie keep up the good diet – love to hear the recipes.
    Is there such a thing as a vegetarian mushroom?
    Or is that OTHER than a vegetarian mushroom.

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  70. Old Bear: Is there such a thing as a vegetarian mushroom? Or is that OTHER than a vegetarian mushroom.[?]

    Vegetarian describes people or diets. Vegetable refers to plants, animal to critters. Turns out mushrooms are more closely related to critters than to plants; i.e., when an original eukaryote lineage split in two, say 3 BYO, one branch gave rise to plants and such, the other split later into fungi and critters, according to study of their DNA.

    Gen. 1:1-2:4a, the newer, 6-day story, comprises two parts: days 1-3 = the setting, and days 4-6 the populating of the setting. 1=separation of light and darkness. 2 = sep. of the waters above and those below by a dome. 3 = sep. of waters below from the ‘dry land,’ which then ‘brought forth’ plants. Then 4 = population of the dome–sun, moon, stars. 5 = popul. of the air and waters–birds, fishes, whales. 6 = popul. of the land–cattle, creeping things, beasts, people [both male and female]. Nothing about fungi; ancients generally considered them plants, maybe defective. Nor about insects [day 5?] or spiders [creepy, so day 6, no?]. Interesting that plants are part of the setting. No ‘living things’ until day 5. Peace,

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  71. Old Bearre

    Yes, I enjoy pickles and learned a few years ago about their benefits. After a while I decided that it might have been a slight sprain so I went to R.I.C.E and woke up this morning feeling better. I need to mow the lawn and then cook for my wife. it is grilling weather, but I have some nice pork chops that I would like to lightly bread and pan fry. The only issue is clean up, which I am not great at and, well, that is the only think that my wife asks me to do.

    I have to make a quick business trip to Mexico then my wife and I are spending a couple days at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island. If anyone has seen Somewhere in Time, that is where the movie was shot. No cars, only horses and bicycles.

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  72. GOOD morning Villagers, I am enjoying Mother’s Day weekend and having a great time. Just bought all the Peeps Easter candy at one store to toss for my Sail Oklahoma Peeps scooping race in October. Good score!

    Rose show was great. I got invited by more than one person to join the group and helped one lady whose rose’s roots were being eaten by voles.

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  73. Merci, sandcastler! Although I have no need for any of those apps (which do look good), I do enjoy discovering that I can still understand enough French to at least get the gist of what is written.

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  74. Debbe, I will be staying Thursday night in Nappannee, In. At this moment I couldn’t tell you where that is but I will by tonight. I’ve been looking at the fire pictures from Canada. That’s a horrible situation.

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  75. Steve, I will be arriving in Mackinac Island about noon Sunday. We will be at the Grand Hotel until Tuesday. If you would like to meet we can figure it out if you will be there at the same time.

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  76. Happy Mothers Day to all to whom it applies.

    I prepared and “catered” lunch to my mom’s apartment. After lunch, I gave her her card, and we sat on her porch under a cloudless blue sky, in a soft warm breeze, talking and reminiscing about old times. Far from a fancy celebration, but it seemed to her…and to me…to be just about perfect.

    “All that I am or ever hope to be, I owe to my angel mother.” – Abraham Lincoln

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  77. Misquoted Wilde but close enough for government work.

    All women become like their mothers. That is the tragedy. No man becomes like his. That is his.

    May still not be exact but close quote.

    I am becoming like mine and since she was much loved it is just fine.

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  78. Jerry:

    I will arrive on Wednesday, May 11th and go home on Friday the 13th. Ironically our Church got a great rate for next weekend and they arrive on Friday and come home on Sunday.

    We honeymooned on Mackinac 34 years ago and could have stayed at the Grand, but I didn’t realize how much money that we would get at the reception. We have gone back quite a few times, but always stayed at a B&B. During the 2000’s we went nearly every year but about 7 or 8 years ago my hips started to hurt from all of the biking, so we stopped going. We’ve been too busy over the last few years to go back.

    You have to wear a coat and tie for dinner and I had a hard time finding at bag to protect my jacket. I remember never having that issue 15-20 years ago.

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  79. Ghost, I never had a chance to do for my mom what you got to do for her today. I know that it has not always been easy, but I envy your time with her. That seems like a slice of heaven on earth.

    Jerry, Nappanee is in Northern Indiana, just south of South Bend. I think Debbe is in very Southern Indiana.

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  80. We don’t get there until Sunday the 15th and it looks like we won’t connect but hopefully I will get better service by telling them that I know you. Thanks for the hint about dinner. I wore a tie to my mother’s funeral and I planned on that being the next to last time that I wore one.

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  81. Happy Mother’s day to all the pertinent parties.

    My mom could ruin my day just by calling my phone, no words necessary. She was irresponsible, irrational, She made me crazy.

    My home is overflowing with the blankets she made me. She could identify the warbled tune I couldn’t get unstuck from my brain at midnight. I could be truly horrible towards her, yet she never held it against me when I needed her.

    I love books, music, lopsided games of scrabble, ruthless games of rummy, and her oatmeal raisin cookies. I hear her voice when I speak. Because she was who she was, I am who I am.

    Thank you, mom.

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  82. Well said, Lady Mindy. And yes, it is passing strange we can have all those contradictory feelings about our moms.

    Steve, I’ve leaned to treat Mom as though every day is the last one I’ll have with her. Because as you know all too well, someday it will be.

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  83. Mindy from Indy, I’ve also conflicted feelings about my mom. She was a tough cookie, warm to her friends, demanding and controlling of us two boys. She’d fight to the death for us, but we never seemed to measure up to her standards. She could be downright cold for days before we figured out what we’d done wrong. And my wife couldn’t do much right by her. She didn’t warm up to our girls until they were old enough to converse with her. The two times she and Dad babysat, he did all the feedings and diaper changes.

    Only during her last 18 months after having an operation to remove what looked on the MRI to be a simple glioma but turned out to be a glioblastoma multiforme was she able to accept me as an adult and treat me with warmth.

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  84. Maybe some of us will have to wait for a full reconciliation. Mom led a tough [not hardscrabble poor] life, some of it of her own making, some of it / others, some of it Wall St. out of control, some of it / a very bright woman in an overwhelmingly man’s world.

    Today’s is still bad, and not being dealt with well by various constituencies, but it was much worse in the ’20s-’30s, and still into the ’60s. BSU’s new Prez is a woman, probably best of the applicants, looks to be a good match.

    BTW, the Mom’s day grill-out at my cleaning lady’s was splendid, and I had to help an offspring w/ homework before I was allowed my ice cream. I also brought home some roasted cauliflower and grilled chicken breast. I am blessed, and well aware of it.

    Peace,

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  85. Thank you all. I tried very hard NOT to think too much about it being Mother’s day while at work. (And after a fellow asked me if I would at least get to spend the afternoon with my children and GRANDCHILDREN, it became much easier. My poor ego.) My relationship with both of my parents is/was complicated. The past few months have been harder than the immediate loss. So days are just better than others.

    Ghost – I was expecting this one. https://youtu.be/nf670orHKcA

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  86. Jackie: I hope that was supposed to be caps not cats. A little concerned about where you might be in relation to the current nasty weather.

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  87. Driving in northern Mississippi outside Tupelo. I just talked to my deputy, the tornadoes were hitting the town where his young son is and mom and son heading for shelter, Glen at my house.

    Will keep ear and eye out for storms and get off road if tornadoes are in my path. Go to motel.

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  88. I don’t have much time to watch InterWebNet birds, but I have seen a fair number of them while sitting out with my mom in front of her apartment. Yesterday afternoon, I saw a mockingbird intercept and dive on a several-times-larger crow from six o’clock high. Said crow had apparently penetrated the ADIZ around the mockingbird’s nest.

    I also saw several of a particular type of insect, some of which were flying solo and some of which were airlining it. (“Fly United”) They were of course the aptly named “love bugs” that invade this area a couple of times per year. They are vexing (in particular, they seem to love to crawl into women’s bras…while they are wearing them), and they make a mess of automobiles that encounter them. Because of that, they have several names that are less polite than “love bugs”. In fact, one of my all-female staff members has a name for them that is both highly descriptive and highly unrepeatable here.

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  89. Debbe 😉 ?

    I liked this one better before they made a Coke commercial out of it. I remember a night on the Gulf Coast after a business meeting; the hotel bar; lots of spirits (not the Ghostly type); a young lady I’d had a strictly business relationship with for several years who sudden seemed intrigued with me; dancing with her while a pretty good band played this song; and…well, you know.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aVgFDEiUlI

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  90. Steve f R O
    Gentle Giants (About draft horses) on RFD-TV did a show about the horses & Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.

    emb
    I was kidding you about vegetarian mushrooms as opposed to Carnivorous mushrooms.

    As a medical study everyone that ate carrots before 1890 is dead (or soon will be)
    ergo carrots must be bad for you.
    So is Di-hydrogen-monoxide in large quantities.

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  91. Good morning Debbe. Passing the time doing a few leg lufts. Missed the tornadoes, more or less. In motel trying to rest and yes, I rescued a few cats. My Mothers Day gift to a friend and his mother.

    I know. I am one cat sbort of Crazy. As my lawyer says, if you are crazy, send me some more.

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  92. Good morning Villagers….

    Back at you Old Bear and Anony…tell you what Jackie, no one can ever say you lead a dull life. Wish I could….ran out of gas in the Danger Ranger yesterday…the state trooper that gave Ian a ticket for not wearing his seat belt a about a week ago, rescued us. He recognized Ian, not sure if that’s a good thing or a bad thing…but that old truck stands out like a sore thumb.

    Still can’t get my Suzi running, it’s not wanting to get gas, and there’s a half a tank in it. A Haynes book arriving this morning, hopefully, we can get it running…soon. Not sure how much more of this Danger Ranger I can handle.

    Storms moving in a few minutes….

    Thanks for thinking of me guys.

    Have a blessed day all of you.

    Reply

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