Plus Chez Arlo



I had a little weekend away, and it was great. I can report, there are significantly fewer oysters in Apalachicola, Florida, than were last Friday. I have returned, though, refreshed and prepared to carry on. There is big news coming in the cartoon world, but I am sworn to secrecy. Admittedly, it is news of an “inside” nature that will interest and affect many cartoonists but probably not so much you, the readers. You might hear about it elsewhere first, but I’ll give you my two cents worth when I can.

Buy the new book, "Beaucoup Arlo & Janis!"Today's "Arlo & Janis!"

63 thoughts on “Plus Chez Arlo”

  1. Happy belated Birthday to Miss Charlotte!!

    As to coffee, I prefer Luzianne with chicory. It’s getting a bit hard to find in most stores, but I manage. Thank goodness for Ingles!

    Smigz, I like Tang, too. It’s just something that sticks with you, I suppose.

    Reply
  2. Here I am driving in Black Jack in Oklahoma on a brilliantly sunny day. Top down weather. I am so happy that I did go bolting through the Village gates and out into the big wide world.

    Reply
  3. (posted on previous page) OB, you told us of a calendar shift of a year and 11 days. Trucker’s reference mentions the 11 days, as I have also seen elsewhere, but not anything like a year shift. Which is it?

    Reply
  4. There was more to my comment but I got a rejection screen. Thought it might be the long URL but now I can’t get the second part to post. Let’s see if something new works.

    Reply
  5. Nice try, Ruth Anne. I get a rejection from Forbes because I won’t turn off my adblocker for them. So if I’m unwilling to accept the junk they push at me, they are going to prevent me reading their articles. OK, only real losers in that contest are the magazines and their authors. The advertisers will find another avenue to pester me.

    Reply
  6. Ruth Anne-

    Note that all these cited news sources are edited. That demonstrates that anything they publish is reviewed for accuracy and reliable sources. A may not agree with what they publish, but I will be assured they are publishing verifiable facts.

    Reply
  7. This is the message I get when I try to finish my comment – but only that particular comment (which contains no extra URL). “The requested URL was rejected. If you think this is an error, please contact the webmaster.” It’s followed by a lengthy number.

    Reply
  8. Road trip yesterday on short notice. Unfortunately not to anywhere with an ample supply of fresh oysters. Back to what I laughingly call a normal schedule today. Hope everyone had a shiny day yesterday and today.

    Happy Birthday, Sweet Charlotte, and many happy returns.

    Reply
  9. Mark, Thanks for the great coffee ads. I really like Lavazza.

    Belated message: Took four of my 6 grand kids to the Mystic Crew of Mutts Mardi Gras parade in downtown Baton Rouge on Sunday. I have never seen that many different kinds of dogs in one place in my life. It was great fun and we got to walk through downtown Baton Rouge, where i went to high school at Catholic Highin the fifties. Everyone had fun.

    God bless us every one. God bless the USA.

    Reply
  10. I’m curious about the big news, too. Though never a member of the broader press, and certainly not a cartoonist [even stick figures are a major challenge for me], this intrigues me.

    Great weather here in N. IL! Many days in the 65-73 degree range this month, and nary a white flake since last year! Yippee! I do hear that a few flakes may hit the ground this weekend, but they won’t remain too long with the temperatures expected.

    Reply
  11. TR, no, but I’ve read the book. Anyway, four years will go by fast. It seems like only yesterday that we were boycotting the Olympics because Russia had invaded Afganistan. The good old days; things were much simpler then.

    Reply
  12. c e-p

    I always hears it was 11 days – The article was cut and paste – “and since it was on the internet
    it must be true.”

    The 2 dates are cut in stone as it were – thinking of it – can’t remember if they were
    they were in that 11 day window, or change from March to Jan. as the start of the New Year.

    Search Results

    ———————————————————————————————————
    December 31, 1751 was followed by January 1, 1752 (the switch from March 25 to January 1 as the first day of the year) September 2, 1752 was followed by September 14, 1752 (drop of 11 days to conform to the Gregorian calendar)
    1752 Calendar Change – Colonial Records & Topics – LibGuides at …
    libguides.ctstatelibrary.org/hg/colonialresearch/calendar

    And

    Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are terms sometimes used with dates to indicate that the calendar convention used at the time described is different from that in use at the time the document was being written. There were two calendar changes in Great Britain and its colonies, which may sometimes complicate matters: the first change was to change the start of the year from Lady Day (25 March) to 1 January; the second was to discard the Julian Calendar in favour of the Gregorian Calendar.[1][2][3] Closely related is the custom of dual dating, where writers gave two consecutive years because of differences in the starting date of the year, or included both the Julian and Gregorian dates.

    Beginning in 1582, the Gregorian calendar replaced the Julian in Roman Catholic countries. This change was implemented subsequently in Protestant and Orthodox countries, usually at much later dates. In England and Wales, Ireland, and the British colonies, the change of the start of the year and the changeover from the Julian calendar occurred in 1752 under the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750. In Scotland, the legal start of the year had already been moved to 1 January (in 1600), but Scotland otherwise continued to use the Julian calendar until 1752.[4][5]

    ———————————————————————————————————–

    I am familiar with N.E. but I am fairly certain that other English colonies have similar.

    Reply
  13. Mark in Boston, I don’t know about the cartoons, but I did see a story last week that Playboy will be reinstating nude photos.

    And Mark in TTown, thanks for the coffee link! I know I can order Luzianne from Amazon, but they don’t always have it in stock.

    Reply
  14. Jimmy, my husband figures the first oyster got eaten when one man dared another to do it. (The one who was dared probably said the prehistoric equivalent of “Hold my beer.”) Looking forward to your news!

    Steve, have you been on one of the Bullet Trains yet?

    Jackie, is Dickens the Adventure Dog with you, or is this a solo flight?

    Reply
  15. Smigz, that probably explains why they are considered aphrodisiacs . . . after having done so and survived he was full of feelings of invulnerability, awesomeness, Potency . . . Yeah, Baby!!

    Reply
  16. I don’t know why everybody is getting upset about the deportations. We declared war on poverty in the ’60’s. It just took us a while to get troops in the field.

    Reply
  17. Thanks for that “News I Can Use”, Jean Dear. I am sure the nude photos one gets by purchasing PB will be much better than the ones to be found on the InterWebNet for free. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  18. I think I’ll try this again and see what happens if I break it up into multiple parts.

    The list of news sources that I posted yesterday reminded me of an assignment that was given by a social studies teacher that I worked with many years ago. This was back in the days when the high school library where I worked still subscribed to many print magazines.

    Reply
  19. That worked but the next part didn’t. Maybe my sentences were too long.

    Assignment: read 3-5 articles all on the same event or person
    Sources: select at least one and no more than 2 from each of the columns/lists of titles
    Column A = traditionally left-leaning *
    Column B = traditionally right-leaning *
    Column C = traditionally center or non-biased *
    * information on bias was not shared

    Reply
  20. The rest of the assignment: Analyze the differences in coverage.

    It was an eye-opening experience for most of his students. I suspect it might still be a worthwhile experience for all of us.

    Reply
  21. Thank you all for the kind birthday wishes yesterday. Such a fine day I had, it was amazing! Son Steve and Daughter Amy are here visiting from the Finger Lakes region in NY. Amy planned a “mystery tour” for my birthday. I couldn’t imagine what she had in mind but knew it would be something nice. It was a warm sunny day and we set off in her car. She drove by secondary roads south into Massachusetts, through the old mill city of Haverhill and on through old towns where the first settlers lived, headed toward the ocean. I haven’t gone anywhere all winter so was happily sightseeing; old houses, well kept up (there’s money in those old towns). Colonial white churches, small paned windows, handsome old trees. Stone walls, outcroppings of ledges; not much touristy stuff until our destination — Gloucester, Mass. It’s on Cape Ann and Amy had found a Cape Ann Museum where we spent a delightful couple of hours, or more. Paintings of ships and the sea; lighthouses; fishermen and their boats and ships; sculptures; real artifacts of seafaring; antique furniture too. We enjoyed it ever so much; it was a real treat for me, I love museums.

    The sun was setting as we got back in the car, and had to drive back to NH in the dark; we could see the Evening Star anyway. Lots of highway traffic heading out of Boston — that’s normal. Home at last we met the rest of the family, who’d all been working — at a drive-in restaurant and seafood place — fried clams for some people — burgers etc. for some. We were hungry and happy to socialize with family. A day to treasure in memory!

    Reply
  22. Charlotte:

    ‘. . . we could see the Evening Star anyway.” Venus is now our Abendstern, has just passed greatest brilliancy, and is rapidly heading into the sunset. It will pass around behind Sol in early March, and soon be visible as our Morgenstern, which it will be for the rest of 2017, though too close this side of Sol for easy viewing by late Nov.

    Just checked all this from Sky & Telescope’s 2017 Skygazer’s Almanac, 40 degrees N. version, on the office door. Only pinup in my office, though there are 4 framed prints of well known paintings, one of them an apparently besotted, unattractive matron at a French affair / Toulouse-Lautrec, and an original Madonna & Child wood carving by a faculty wife who abruptly deserted her husband and son decades ago. Still a good carving. ‘Life is so full of a number of things.’ Where is that from?

    Peace,

    Reply
  23. It’s β€œThe world is so full of a number of things, I ’m sure we should all be as happy as kings.” From somewhere in Robt. Louis Stevenson’s “Child’s garden of verse’ which is too long for me to scan at bedtime.

    Peace,

    Reply
  24. DeathAnalyzed.com is an interesting site for stats on longevity listed by surname and place of SS number, not residence at death. I just ran across it. I suppose maiden names or married names could be used for slightly different reasons. Just enter the surname and click the supposed magnifying glass symbol.

    It uses data from the social security listings, no doubt the reason for filing by place of SS number.

    Reply
  25. PS: By experiment, you can enter a full name, even including middle initial. Middle names don’t seem acceptable, at least for the few I tried.

    For some names – but not all – one can select only those from a given state to shorten a search for a particular person.

    Reply
  26. We missed Jimmy in Apalachicola by less than a week! We were just passing through and got there on a Monday and found the Hole in the Wall was closed on Mondays, so went to Papa Joe’s. Stayed around an extra day so we could eat at the Hole in the Wall on Tuesday.

    Reply
  27. That was last name only, and it’s about 8,000th most popular. No data for given + sur. Ran into one other online decade or so ago. Kid in TX on h.s. basketball team, if I remember. Hope he’s survived college.

    Reply

Leave a Comment