RIP, Rufus Thomas


Buy the new book, "Beaucoup Arlo & Janis!"Today's "Arlo & Janis!"
Here’s an old Gene-centric cartoon from 1998. I’m traveling today on cartoon business (Yes, there is such a thing!), but I’ll be back here as soon as I can. If you’re in Tishomingo County and you see a beat-up bright blue Ford pickup truck, wave!

130 thoughts on “RIP, Rufus Thomas”

  1. I didn’t know cartoonists got up this early, even for cartoon business. Not sure where that county is, but pretty sure it is not in Louisiana. We don’t have counties here.

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  2. The winner is-Tippy. I know that the actress is Tippi, but I think that Tippy is better for her. Thanks everybody for the help. Maybe we’ll see you down at the general store.

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  3. “Tishomingo Blues,” in addition to being a great blues tune, is the first Elmore Leonard book I ever read. (I was late to the party.) Great book, about the battle in Mississippi. Sort of.

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  4. Thanks, Mark. I knew about Spotify Running but haven’t had time to experiment with it; like the writer said, just using my playlists now. But, gadget freak that I am, I’ll try it soon. And I do have an armband carrier and a Bluetooth headset.

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  5. emb

    Me Too

    Jerry
    Now that you have the name when do wet the babies head.

    Now that you have decided BH suggested Sticky = Velcro – Hard to say “here Hook & Loop Fastener.”

    Velcro could be a nickname.
    We have

    Skinny Minnie = Skeezix
    Pudgie Muggie or Wooly Bully = Lily
    Sneezy Wheezy = Arnold
    Tuney = Petunia
    Rose does not elicit nicknames other than Rosie
    Hoover = our Tippy guess why

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  6. We have Spunkey Monkey and Cilla Willa. Elvis remains Elvis. Early on Spunky was occasionally Hootie due to her rotating ears. Tippy will probably be Tippy Baby or Tippy Girl for the forseeable future. I always thought that Cilla would have been a good mother and she has become very patient with Tippy, even when she is eating and Tippy is sticking her nose in or patting her on the head. Surprisingly Spunky won’t play with her, but I’m sure that she will come around.

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  7. Tishomingo, Oklahoma is of course a Native American name and we often share names with Alabama and Mississippi where the tribes lived before the removal. For instance Eufaula, Oklahoma where I live is also Eufaula, Alabama. And to make matters worse I live on Lake Eufaula and so do people in Alabama.

    Rufus Thomas most famous for Walking the Dog used to play for fraternity parties when I was young dancing queen

    Once stayed in hotel from The Birds in Tippi Hedrons room where she came annually in some sort of memorial to movie. I take it she passed away?

    Still in Port Townsend, WA just hanging out and enjoying cool weather. It has been in 40s and 50s today.

    Trapper Jean, remember that hilarious Jeannie Robertson comedy routine on the pashimina toss? Well I bought myself one out of pashimina and silk, a Celtics eternity pattern and I thought of you of course. I love it, wore it all afternoon. Should anyone who has asked for a selfie still care what I look like, a friend put a fairly decent one on Facebook tonight. Popped up from behind the grocery counter like a paparazzi.

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  8. Good morning Villagers…..

    TR…that is one awesome song and video. Had never heard of them…thanks for the ‘tune in’…makes one proud to be an American. The lady has one strong voice. Think I’ll do some research on them.

    Jerry…I like the spelling of Tippy….tippy toes, and kittens do ‘tippy toe’ 🙂 Tippy is very fortunate to have found a loving home. Thanks for rescuing her.

    My favorite season is coming soon. I love the smell of fall, the colors, and the crispness of the mornings….then there’s winter….arrrgghhhh. I really will miss Ian then, he always got the car warmed up, scraped the ice/snow off. Oh well, a woman’s gotta go what a woman’s gotta do.

    In case anyone is interested, The University of Rhode Island alumni magazine did a very nice article on one of its alumni…the lady behind BCN.

    gotta go….

    ya’ll have a blessed…what day is it?????

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  9. I just learned something today. 40 years ago I was taught that leaving a florescent light on was more energy efficient than turning it on and off constantly. It went against conventional wisdom, but I figured that it was something that I knew and others didn’t.

    We always keep the light off in our copying room at work. I often will need to turn it on so that I can see what I am doing and never turn it off. So I just googled whether my longtime postion was accurate and several websites said that it was a myth.

    I hate it when I’m wrong, but thankful that I can learn something. It is not the first time!

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  10. Steve From Royal Oak, MI & Mark

    True leaving the lamp on uses more energy -BUT as Mark said it shortens the life considerably-
    and the ballast life. So in the long run the cost and carbon footprint is less by leaving fluorescent s
    on – within reason.
    Not mentioned is start time on Fluo bulbs – it takes time for them to come to full brightness
    and I notice the one I use here it dims over time. Also they don’t work when temperatures are below freezing – which is a problem when it gets 40* below here.
    Read the article-

    Our car dealer replace 8 foot fluorescent lamps with LED – the operating cost of All LED
    = to 1 8 foot fixture.

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  11. About lights: you cannot take everything into consideration. Many believe fluorescents give off only light, not heat. I believe they actually radiate more heat than light, just not as much more than incandescents. LEDs are much better, but still radiate some heat.

    Further, all indoor artificial light, except what little leaves via windows, eventually is absorbed by walls, rugs, furniture, people, etc., and is reradiated as heat. So, especially in summer when you may be using A.C. to cool the house [and heat the neighborhood], best to keep lights off when possible. Fans, of course, don’t cool the house, they heat it, but cool you by evaporating your sweat.

    In the 8-9 months that we heat our houses here, they [+ the fridge, m’wave, toaster, slow cooker, water heater, freezer, etc. all heat the house]. Even in what some consider the far north, I believe Mpls/SP may annually use more electricity to cool than to heat. I’ve been using it for neither most of the summer and often still, manipulating windows instead.

    Peace, emb

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  12. Yes I agree on reducing the life of the tube (or technically lamp) and that was part of the reason that I tended not to turn off lights. I read that a rule of thumb is that if you won’t be in a room for 15 minutes, turn off the light. I have watched people go into the copy room and watched them constantly turning the lights on of off (no I am not Richmeister…..Rob Schneider) and it sometimes drives me crazy.

    Bottom line was that I was interested in hearing other people’s opinion.

    Now do we want to discuss making the bed? I never make the bed but if I HAVE to, I try to wait an hour for it to cool off and dry as that is how organisms like to breed.

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  13. I was taught as S/RO was: let the bed air out at least an hour or two before making it. The MBH was not taught so and tends to remake it upon rising.

    Poll: Without looking it up, how many Villagers know the name “Learned Hand”? In connection, were you raised in or near New York City?

    This came up at a church group last evening and I decided to ask a wider selection of folks.

    Now you can look him up; if nowhere else, Wikipedia has an extensive article on him.

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  14. I knew he was a judge and thought he might have been involved with a sport. Then I realized I was thinking of another judge with an interesting name – Kennesaw Mountain Landis.

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  15. Concerning lights – I’ve often wondered about this, as I seldom have on any lights. Walking through my home at night, I generally only turn on the light of the destination room (and frequently not even then). My bedside lamp bulbs are 14+ years old.

    As for bed making, my bed is seldom fully unmade or made – I sleep on a diagonal at the top of the bed.

    Yes, I am strange. I made peace with this long ago.

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  16. Dear c – ex p, yes, I know of Judge Learned Hand, and did not grow up in NYC — though NH is not too far away. I have read very widely.

    Mindy, you must be not awfully tall, perhaps? I was also taught to let the bedclothes “air” for a while. Now that I live alone, sometimes I don’t make it all day. If company is coming, I probably will make it up.

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  17. Nice going, Mindy, on saving electricity. You deserve a prize! There are streetlights that shine in my windows so I can see pretty well. Emb, thanks for the well-considered discussion of saving energy. It’s very important!

    Nice to hear from Jackie, even as Anonymous, and nice to learn the origin of these names — Indian. I wouldn’t have guessed Eufaula, or the reason some names are the same in more than one State. (I should have written Native American.)

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  18. Charlotte in NH, unless the bed is queen-sized or larger, I have to sleep diagonally so my feet don’t go beyond the edge. Or hit my head on the headboard. Recliners are problematic too, as the footrest is more of a mid-calf rest for me.

    Mindy from Indy, I don’t dare walk in our house without lights since we have two black cats.

    On cat names, holdover from the other day, Catapult would be a good name for a cat with exceptional jumping skill.

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  19. Unfortunately, it’s easy to walk around our house without turning on lights since we have neighbors who overdo their outdoor lighting. I feel sorry for the children who have no idea how many stars they aren’t able to see. On my bucket list – camping overnight at Ft. Jefferson in the Keys and/or a stay at Frying Pan Tower off the Carolinas.

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  20. Many years ago I went in to the office on a Saturday – with only the office fluorescent
    lights the temperature rose 6* in about 4-5 hours.
    Went from 65* to 71* –
    Not only the tubes heat but also the ballasts – new electronic
    ballasts are cooler but if the tubes go out and are not replaced immediately the ballast burns out also.

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  21. Cleaning lady makes the bed once a month. That was also true when wife was here. We made the bed when we washed the sheets. “Sometimes in the springtime and . . ..”

    Maybe had heard of him at Stuyvesant but remember him from Govt.* 101 at Cornell. *’Political Science” in some schools.

    Peace, emb

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  22. Ruth Anne, the absolutely best starry, starry night I ever had was camping on the summit of the Manama Observatory on the Big Island in Hawaii. There is a reason the observatory is up there. Really cold. Almost froze but most incredible stars. And the mountain goats bleated all night.

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  23. There is a wonderful bookstore here that I love. Got myself I Shall Wear Midnight by Terry Pratchett, a tee shirt that says “I do my own writing stunts” and a second that says “Be careful, you may show up in my novel”.

    But my favorite is a quote I intend to frame, “It takes a Village to raise a writer.”

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  24. Good morning Villagers…

    Going to be a long harvest here…The Boss said no one takes time off until harvest is over. He’ll be pulling in the guys to work at the mills and that means it’ll take me more time to put the hen house back in order for the next day…..oh well, I’ll take that paycheck.

    Bed making? I make it when I come home as husband is usually sleeping when I leave. I had a friend who raised two stepsons, her rule was she didn’t care if they made the bed when they got up or before they went to bed…the bed got made that day.

    Jackie….quit being anonymous….I miss your ‘love Jackie”…..I am so happy for you, love the T-shirts.

    Indy Mindy…sleep anyway you can get it 🙂 With your hours and stress you probably just fall into bed….and how is the new job hunting going?

    Light bulbs…we use those funny looking ones that look like pig tails (and yes, you are reading a blond moment here)….there’s about 350 of them in the hen house, they stay on from 6 am until 10 pm. and are 40 watt with low heat index.

    gotta go

    ya’ll have a blessed day

    get some rest GR 😉

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  25. An 8.3 quake in Chile last night with magnitude 7. aftershocks. Tsunami warnings in effect around the Pacific including US. Debbe, I don’t twig harvest. Don’t you harvest every day? Congratulations to the observation and analytical skills of villagers. You know who you are. Finally, rain threat to Tampa area from storm in Gulf. No biggy.

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  26. Is it ok to feel stupid and delighted at the same time? Item in The Writer’s Almanac about Ken Kesey [probably his birthday]. Mentions that “One flew over the cuckoo’s nest” is from a children’s folk rhyme, presumably Brit.:

    The film’s title was derived from a familiar, tongue-twisting Mother’s Goose children’s folk song (or nursery rhyme) called Vintery, Mintery, Cutery, Corn. The ones that fly east and west are diametrically opposed to each other and represent the two combatants in the film. The one that flies over the cuckoo’s nest [the mental hospital filled with “cuckoo” patients] is the giant, ‘deaf-mute’ Chief:

    Vintery, mintery, cutery, corn,
    Apple seed and apple thorn;
    Wire, briar, limber lock,
    Three geese in a flock.
    One flew east,
    And one flew west,
    And one flew over the cuckoo’s nest.

    I’ve not seen the movie nor read the book, but realized that the point is that Old World cuckoos don’t build nests; they are all brood parasites. Have known the term for decades, but just woke up. Have a hunch that the website doesn’t know the double entendre either, and perhaps most Americans don’t. Our cuckoos are only occasionally brood parasites. Peace, emb

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  27. Heard from my New Zealand weather station a few minutes ago, they are at less risk now, he knows I don’t and won’t turn on a television. So he sent me a note about expected tsunami so I would know. Just heard he and dog had returned to boat to get some sleep, then said they’d had a big sudden surge that pushed boat into dock but no damage.

    Of course he’ll be in Chile in November’December so now I can worry about earthquakes AND ice packs in Drake passage.

    Love, anonymous

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  28. Mindy/Indy: did you send me a private email at 10:12 this morning or has someone been able to send out stuff over your name? I won’t open it unless you verify that you sent a message.

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  29. In case anyone wondered and because little else is happening here today, I inquired about Judge Learned Hand and NYCity because his name popped up quite often in the NYCity newspapers from the time I started reading newspapers (ca. 1946) onwards. The name stuck with me. As his judgeships were based in NYCity, I wondered if he were well-known just around NYCity or elsewhere. So far, only Charlotte/NH has indicated familiarity with the name while not being a resident of NYCity.

    I suppose, then, that his name was rather better known in the region in which he worked than elsewhere. The Wikipedia article does say that Judge Hand’s decisions are the ones most frequently cited [of all lower court judges] by the Supreme Court in their own decisions.

    From the same Wikipedia item, I’d say his wife was something, too!

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  30. In the 70’s, I was assistant county engineer in Colbert County Alabama. We had a road on a peninsula in the backwater of the Tennessee River. We had to around through Tishomingo County Ms to get equipment to the road.

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  31. We know a couple who are sailing the South Pacific and are currently in Pago Pago, American Samoa. The tsunami warning there said that they might expect seas of 1 meter above normal. She said they couldn’t tell if what they experienced was due to that or to the windy weather they were having.

    Can’t remember what he did for a living but he must have done well to be able to commission a catamaran suitable for crossing the Pacific. Not my retirement dream, but I admire people who not only dream big but make it happen!

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  32. CEP, I have heard the name, but could not have told you who he was or even if it was a he. I was, however, good friends with Judge Fred Turner, who, as an attorney, was involved in a world famous case. You hear the results of that case almost every time that you turn on the tv. Do you know which case that was?

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  33. “Liberty lies in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no law, no court can save it.” – Judge Learned Hand

    I researched who he was when I was a teen, from seeing his quotes in both works of fiction and non-fiction.

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  34. Jerry: haven’t the foggiest notion as to what case that was.

    Mindy/Indy: Thank you for the info.

    GR6: the citation which arose briefly [from Judge Hand] was one in which he said things to the effect that whoever controls the media controls the country. I imagine researching him was, at the very least, edifying.

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  35. Dear c-xp, thank you ever so much for inspiring me to look up the life of Learned Hand in Wikipedia! I like to read about people’s lives — their backgrounds, their childhoods, their school and work lives — their loves, spouses, children, and family life. Judge Hand had a most interesting life, needless to say! And I also found out that he bought a home in Cornish, NH for his family and spent a lot of time there. I read the entire long Wikipedia article, altho I did only skim the later sections about his legal decisions and opinions.

    Dearest Ghost, you are a well educated man.

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  36. Jerry in FL, thanks for that. I never knew the origin of that companion to the Miranda reading provided to each newly-arrested person.

    How’s Precious being assimilated into your family?

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  37. C-XP, I became aware of Learned Hand in college due to this quote:

    “Anyone may arrange his affairs so that his taxes shall be as low as possible; he is not bound to choose that pattern which will best pay the Treasury; there is not even a patriotic duty to increase one’s taxes.”

    His name, of course, is enough to arrest attention, but he also seemed to have a lot on the ball.

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  38. CXP, I am another who recognized the name Learned Hand and knew that it was “Judge Learned Hand.” I never researched him and couldn’t tell you anything else about him but that he was a judge (and a famous one, since I did know his name). I’ve only been in New York two or three days in my life. (Well, maybe a few more than that–two separate “tourist” trips, one while in high school.) Born in Kansas, lived in Arizona since 1968. I read a LOT, though, and my mind tends to be a fount of (mostly) useless knowledge. Hooray for trivia.

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  39. Indeed it was the Miranda saying “If you cannot afford an attorney one will be appointed to represent you.” The case was Clarence Earl Gideon vs. Wainwright. I also knew Mr. Wainwright but we won’t go there. Fred was Gideon’s attorney in his second trial. Gideon’s Trumpet was the book about the case. What is not mentioned in the book is that Gideon admitted stealing the money but said that he just walked in the unlocked back door. He felt that he was unfairly accused of breaking in. I know this because I have a copy of the notes of his presentence interview. Re the new baby in our house, she is Tippy although she is definitely precious. She can stand flatfooted, put her head down and do a flip. She insisted on being friendly to the cats which hissed at her and they have accepted her. What else are you going to do when you weigh 19 lbs (Elvis) and a 4 lb kitty (Tippy) leaps on your back. We do need to teach her not to swat him on the nose and I’m working on it.

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  40. Small aftershocks in the area of 4.1 to 5.4 continue in Chile, have occurred in Columbia and small quakes have occurred in Kansas and Idaho, which shows how little I know. I was expecting another major Indonesian quake about now.

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  41. One more: the NHC needs to get on the ball. What used to be a patch of rain over Florida could be a hurricane in the Atlantic by tomorrow. Initial movement would be to the east, but that could change.

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  42. Good morning Villagers….

    Jerry, I don’t quite understand your comment ” I don’t twig harvest. Don’t you harvest every day?” And I am happy to hear Tippy is being a playful kitten, maybe she will bring out the “kitten” in your other cats.

    Saw the headline on the earthquake on Whether.com, and pulled up Drudge Report…nothing there. But there was a headline on cooking salmon with pot called “Half Baked” 🙂 Then I read there are more cats in Niagara Falls than people…..haven’t they heard of neutering?

    GR 😉 thought of you the other morning when I saw a headline on Whether.com…..it read that a lady surfed in stilettos….I don’t click on videos, takes too long to down load them off there…see, I do get all my news from the weather report.

    Aw, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”….best scene…Jack Nickelson’s interview with the psychiatrist upon entering the mental institution.

    gotta go…

    ya’ll have a blessed day

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  43. Debbe 😉 To go someplace where there are beaches, booze and bikinis? Sure!

    I didn’t see the video about surfing in stilettos, but I still have fond memories of the TV commercial of some years back featuring young ladies playing basketball in high heels. “Looks like a pump; feels like a sneaker”…what’s not to like about that? 😉

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mp8gmtPljqw

    Anyone know why a particular style of lady’s shoe is called a “pump”? The first thing that comes to my mind doesn’t actually seem too likely.

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  44. emb, the painting is titled “The Supplicant”, making it unlikely, by my lights, that the bearded figure is Moses. Perhaps more likely an emperor, king or some type of viceroy?

    I’ve stayed at Holiday Inn Expresses, but I’ve never seen staff there quite as comely as the female on the right.

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  45. I like today’s A&J, it reminds me so much of the struggles my better half and I are going through with our life style change to lose weight and keep it off. We are both of a generation, and from poor families where you don’t waste, you “clean your plate”, and all leftovers are saved and used for something. We are learning we don’t need to, or really should, “clean our plate” all the time. In addition we are trying to stick to a new leftover rule. Three days in refrigerator and it’s dead and goes. Very hard changes to make. Arlo looks like a member of the “Waste not Want not” club too.

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  46. Good luck with your struggle, Ursen, and as I well know, it is a struggle, even (or especially) to lose and keep off relatively “small” amounts of weight. Before I got organized and started with WW, I used a technique I believe someone here mentioned, that of not changing what you eat but to only eat half your normal portions. Even if you only do that every other day, you will probably see positive results. I did.

    And yes, I’ve notice many of the younger generation (30 to 40 yo) seem to have no taste for “leftovers” at all.

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  47. Yup GR I am using a VA program called MOVE! in connection with Telehealth which requires me to call in my weight and vital signs every day, and blood sugar levels every other day. The key being, like I said, realizing it is more than a diet, it is a life style change. I can have biscuits and gravy just not every other day.

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  48. Thanks for the introduction to Judge Learned Hand. My DAR chapter puts a display about Constitution Week (Sept 17-23) in the Conroe Library (or one of the Woodlands libraries) during the month of September. Included in the display are quotes about the Constitution, and I have added one from Judge Hand. Others include Patrick Henry ““The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government — lest it come to dominate our lives and interests.” and George Washington “The Constitution is the guide which I never will abandon.” and even Thomas Edison “The strength of the Constitution, lies in the will of the people to defend it.”

    End of history lesson.

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  49. My reference to the page where Jimmy publishes the A&J cartoon threw me into moderation h*** All I wanted to know was whether anyone else has had an eruption of irritating ads inserted into the page. I am wondering if there is a cookie on my computer or if this is a new marketing tool, since there is another site where I am having the same experience.

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  50. It was not the reference to the cartoon page, it was the reference to the low sodium diet my husband and I are now trying out. We haven’t noticed big changes in our blood pressure, but then at my eye doctor appointment yesterday my pressure was slightly lower and my vision was crisper. I had thought the slight blurriness six months ago was due to developing cataracts, but apparently not. (Perhaps the moderation was triggered by the backslashes in the vision readings – we will see soon)

    Another side effect is a slow weight loss. Maybe due to less water weight, maybe to eating less of food that is not so tasty so the temptation to overeat is lessened.

    As for leftovers – I find it very difficult to waste food (as in throwing it away) – and now that the kids are long gone we often have leftovers. My solution is to use the freezer after the second day, labeling the containers with the date. The next month, there are several days I won’t have to cook.

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  51. Today was a good day to visit the Village. I needed that. Thank you.

    For Judge Learned Hand, for life changes, for courage, the Constitution, and left overs.

    As a teen cooking on the farm, my thrifty nature rebelled at the vast amount of waste going to the dogs, literally, so I began to cook soups and stews. When the men folks began to notice and complain about the strange vegetables they found, I discovered an antique moulin in a cabinet and began to turn suspect vegs into a precursor of Jack Lelayne. Or maybe I got idea from him?

    Still do that of course, only now it’s trendy. Love.

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  52. I did not mean to imply, in my last post, that it does not matter *what* you eat, because obviously some foods are better choices than others. As an example, last evening I was in line at my neighborhood market, and the lady checking out in front of me was, as my sister used to say, “One mama high and two mamas wide.” Then I noticed she was purchasing “mass quantities” of potatoes, mac and cheese, sugary soft drinks and pork chops. I don’t presume that I’m anyone’s nanny and tell then what they should or should not eat (unlike certain New York City mayors), so I figure that is her choice, but what bothered me was that her young daughter was with her, and she is undoubtedly eating from the same table.

    And yes, every successful weight loss program involves life-style changes, not just some fad diet of the month.

    I meant to mention yesterday that the actual signing of the Constitution in Philadelphia took place on September 17, 1787, but I got busy and failed to do so.

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  53. I did not mean to imply we throw away huge amount of food. We practice portion control. If we are out and get served more than we need, we either to go box it, or if it is too little for that forget it. Ordering smaller amounts can be a challenge, but many restaurants will work with you, although there may be a slight monetary penalty. At home it is healthy foods in smaller amounts. The other night we had brown rice and black eyed peas with leftovers for two days. Perfect. It is just relearning eating, from what is accepted. And some restaurants are naturally off limits. A local restaurant everyone is telling us to go to has it’s small steak of a 16oz sirloin. That is 4 times too much, hence off limits restaurant. It’s regular steak is 32oz. Crazyness.

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  54. Judy: I’m with you on leftovers (except for the part about kids, which we don’t have). Before I retired, I might plan leftovers to go to work with me for lunch. I try to rearrange parts of a couple of meals so that we don’t have exactly the same thing – although Bob doesn’t mind that as much as I do. Last week we got three dinners out of one rotisserie chicken, which was on sale. It helps to have been raised by parents who had gone through the Depression and war-time rationing 🙂

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  55. My thrifty soul rebels at throwing out any leftovers, too! Just don’t cook any new food until they are gone. Use common sense, of course — they can be combined, disguised — all sorts of things any housewife figures out. Or as Judy in Conroe says, put them in the freezer.

    Jackie as Anon., good for you. You’ve got the right idea.

    Dearest Ghost, what a sad story, about the woman and her daughter at the check-out.

    Debbe, when Jerry says he doesn’t “twig” your meaning, he’s using British slang, pretty old too, saying he doesn’t understand. Jerry, Debbe’s boss, she’s mentioned, has mills for some kind of grain; in addition to the egg business; guess that’s what’s being harvested.

    Love,
    Charlotte

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  56. My freezer is my friend. Large pots of homemade chili, marinara sauce, jambalaya, gumbo, stews, hardy soups, stoups, leftovers, etc. get reduced to serving-sized portions; frozen in small freezer containers; and removed to reclosable freezer bags. Then my microwave oven becomes my friend when I don’t have time to prepare from scratch.

    Ginormous restaurant food portions are a problem. One of my lady friends and I regularly share an entrée at her favorite Italian eatery with separate salads, but not all places are agreeable to that. (In that case, eat half and get a carry-out container for the remainder.) And I can no longer eat anywhere where they have all-you-can-eat buffets, for seeing what so many already overweight patrons do to themselves there.

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  57. Good luck for all trying to lose weight; I ought to, too.

    Y’all who liked that mention of Learned Hand made me feel useful. Thank you for that…a lot.

    One way to minimize leftovers is to prepare less food. That implies more time spent in the kitchen, cooking new stuff more often, so I’d go with those who eat once or twice on a meal and then freeze the rest for future use.
    In my first teaching post, we had a 20-ish married female neighbor who had never heard of leftovers!! She actually thought that even a classic roast was for one meal only, and simply discarded anything remaining after one meal!! I cannot fathom the waste. Apparently, she had been raised in a rich household and never saw the same meal twice; I do hope that that household had some hired help and that said putative help ate the remains.

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  58. Another trick that works well at some restaurants is to get a side-sized salad and then an appetizer as entrée, such as the fried green tomatoes topped with crawfish at our local Cajun spot. (Yes, they’re fried too but we don’t do it that often.) It’s an easy way to get a reasonable amount of food.

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  59. Yes, that works well, also, Ruth Anne. Or just the salad. I have an out-of-state friend who loves to go to a family-style restaurant for their buttermilk pancakes when I visit her (and needs the calories, due to her medical conditions). So I order their club salad with non-fat dressing and push a couple of the toppings to the side. And I also eat at a New Orleans-style place where their version of fried green tomatoes is to die for.

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  60. Ursen
    One tip I heard was get the box FIRST, put half the meal in the box (Or more in the case of the
    steak) that way there is no temptation.

    We do not waste food – some is frozen but we cook small portions and it may be boring but
    if it is not used we eat it the next and the next till it is gone little at a time and sometimes transformed.

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  61. Half a lifetime ago (and change) when first married my bride cooked a roast.
    Well rather cool in the middle – so we ate the outside , several days in a row.
    Then it became stew and then soup.
    She got to be a better cook faster than I did.

    Reply
  62. GR6: “I’ve never seen staff there quite as comely as the female on the right.”

    Maybe you have but don’t know because they dress differently. In an earlier TIP[?] painting, the middle teen maiden [?] on the left was just right. I can remember lusting after such servant girls in National Geographic paintings of ancient civilizations back in late ’30-’40s issues. Youthful testosterone is potent. Racial note: it was ok to show nude bre asts and such in college bio texts in the ’50s-70s as long as they were not Caucasian. Or, in a genetic situation called testicular feminization, if the XY “girl” had her face blacked out. You could tell she suntanned in a one piece suit.

    I’ve never been seriously overweight [Dad’s family’s genes, I guess], but put on a bit in my 60s, so cut back, boxed, eschewed fats [thus avoiding statins], and such. One result is that steadily eating small portions has made me uncomfortable stuffing myself. Major downfall is church meals w/ many kinds of bars.

    Unconventional approaches to leftovers and to appropriate food for time of day have added variety, sometimes delicious, generally palatable. This evening, half a Qdoba burrito + leftover veggie mélange from the freezer for supper, other half of burrito for Sun. supper unless I pig out too much [unlikely] at wherever the crowd goes after BUMC service. Hey, Arlo put the accent over the é for me.

    Peace, emb

    Reply
  63. This town has lots of restaurants but only a couple with hours past 9 even on weekends and about four with a healthier menu or small plates. I shut down the best one tonight at the bar with the owner and staff. Although I have been a teetotlar since my late 20s.

    They have a late night, small plate menu and I found that even enormous although they switched the half crab on half English muffin to have a generous side salad, the artichoke pate should have been shared. Since I had missed lunch I was starving, not good.

    The iced tea was great and the owner had been drinking long before I got there! So, funny late dinner. Food is excellent there and I thought of Ghost. The bartender said he quit counting years poring at 40. He was good and poured totally free hand and fast, don’t know who besides me loved Cocktail for the gymnastics with bottles?

    Loved the door knocker video! Loved all the leftover ideas.
    Reading Ghost in particular and emb have helped me in cooking for one. Not especially easy to do if you like good food. Recipes are never for one and seldom for two.

    I bet you do, Ghost. Love.

    Reply
  64. Hello Villagers,

    Happy International Speak Like a Pirate Day to one and all. For those who are unfamiliar with how a rascally pirate should speak, there is an amusing blurb at wikihow.com/Talk-Like-a-Pirate.

    Reply
  65. Good morning Villagers…

    How in the world did Talk Like a Pirate day come to be? Guess I’ll wiki it. Thank you fan in japan and Indy Mindy 🙂

    Thank you Miss Charlotte for explaining ‘twig’. I entered ‘define twig’ in the search tab, but none of it made any sense. And you are correct on the harvesting. Combines everywhere, bringing in corn, soybeans and milo. The mills buy, dry and crush and make it into feed to resale for cattle, horses and such.

    We have leftovers when it comes to soups, stews and such. After a couple of days, if there’s a lot left, it goes into the freezer. I also follow the rule “when in doubt, throw it out”. Not much goes to waste here. Husband has become a thrifty shopper and chef. He cooks less amounts since Ian has left.

    Buzzer on dryer just went off…got work clothes to fold….

    ya’ll have a blessed day

    …and a cool front is arriving today…..Amen It was 92 degrees inside the hen house when we left at 3ish yesterday.

    Reply
  66. Charlotte, thanks for the explanations. I actually thought that Robert Heinlein made up the word twig so you taught me two things. I’ll have to do the Wikipedia search. NHC is now calling it disturbance 1, but I will do a Howard Cosell and say “Just as I predicted.” Since I have been catching up on the blog (busy yesterday) we received a call. My wife’s best friend of 40 years has died of stomach cancer. Fortunately my wife was able to visit her Thursday, knowing that it would be any day. I remember my parents saying that their social life was mostly going to funerals.

    Reply
  67. TWC is showing beautiful pictures of trees that have already changed colors up north. This time of year I envy you folks. But, I think that the last time I wore a pair of long pants was my uncle’s funeral. It occurs to me that I have used two English words recently. Apparently everyone knew what a bumbershoot was. Lord, I was born a rambling man.

    Reply
  68. Holy cow! I just saw a picture of Neil Young at the rock and roll hall of fame in 2011. A few years ago I saw a guy in a restaurant and was sure that it was Neil. I asked him and he claimed that he didn’t know who Neil Young was. It was the same guy in the picture and he was wearing the same clothes.

    Reply
  69. Debbe, if you ever got Ian to install the free version of Spotify, you can listen to David Gilmour’s new album. It released yesterday and the entire thing is available to listen to. I have listened to it once already and think it is excellent. Nice assortment of styles, too, including one jazz piece.

    Have a good and safe day, everyone.

    Jerry, good to hear your wife got to visit her friend before she died.

    Reply
  70. To really date myself I not knowing who I was talking to let Tennessee Erie Ford tell me what a jerky Bing Crosby was and not to ask for an autograph. Turns out he was telling the truth, of course. And I learned at a young age that celebrities enjoy humor and never got an autograph my entire life.

    Learned pretty girls get to talk to amazing people and so do old ladies. Have no idea why? Love.

    Reply
  71. I have an idea why. 😉

    Debbe 😉 Honest, hon, I tried. My (attempted) posts last night simply disappeared into the aether, never to be seen again. As I mentioned, I’ve had problems with my home InterWebNet service, which are better but still extant, for about a week. But I’m not sure that’s the problem, as when I would re-post a comment that did not appear, WordPress would message me I had “already said that”. So they must have been received and not moderated but simply disregarded.

    The ISP service guy who showed up Monday was helpful, but I got the impression he never really found the root of the problem. (He did change out my wireless modem, so I got better one for free.) In The Department of Small Words, it turned out he was an ex-Air Force avionics tech; a shootist and firearms instructor; and a part-time training instructor for one of the area LE agencies. So I enjoyed meeting him, anyway. What I have now is a series of internet interruptions that occur at random intervals and last from a few minutes to a half hour or longer. Later this morning, I will probably prepare emergency supplies and join the phone queue for technical support for the duration, to see what their magical “testing” procedures show now.

    Reply
  72. So I’ll try again, in response to Bear’s comment about the first roast his new bride prepared…

    From the Joan Rivers Cook Book:

    How to Cook a Roast

    1. Put a large roast and a small roast into the oven
    2. When the small roast is burned, the large roast is ready

    Reply
  73. It was a good blow but the light wind was from the N [it had been W], the humidity was probably high, and what the people on the boardwalk got was a huge cloud. Would’ve been nice from the walk on the N side.

    That’s where the ‘would of’ that I caught somewhere, maybe at BUMC, came from.

    Peace, emb

    Reply
  74. emb: If you access the TIP site through Google, you can right click on the image and get a dropdown box that includes “Search Google for this image”. Left clicking on that will usually yield a name for the painting and links to other sites with images of the painting.

    Reply
  75. GR6
    Re: Joan Rivers Cook Book
    My bride would eat the burnt roast and I the other. She does like “shoe leather”,
    me not so much.

    I have known “twig” forever, maybe it is a NE Yankeeism.
    Like “trig” means put a block in front of (and behind) a wheel.

    Reply
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