Rooster Day, 2017


It’s Rooster Day in Demopolis, Alabama, the second annual festival commemorating the famous Rooster Sale of 1919. The auction of over 200 roosters and one hen, donated by Helen Keller, was to be the local contribution toward a bridge across the Tombigbee River, outside “the City of the People.” It would be the last link in an overland highway from Savannah, Georgia, to San Diego. The sale garnered pledges of more than $200,000, though accounts say many were never honored. I encourage you to search the subject, and be sure to search “Tombigbee flood Rooster Bridge towboat.”
When I was a young whelp in the early 80s, I hitched on with The Jackson Daily News in Jackson, Mississippi. As I was a native of east Alabama, on the Georgia line, I would travel home several times a year to visit family. This journey took me through west Alabama on U.S. Highway 80, then a narrow two-lane road from the Mississippi line to Selma, a distance of about 100 miles. This was before the rapacious scalping of southern woodlands for the export of wood chips, and for some distance forests would grow close along both sides of the right of way. It was like something out of Hansel and Gretel. Right in the middle of this stretch of “the widows’ highway” was the original Rooster Bridge outside Demopolis. It was a rickety iron structure high above the water that carried only one lane of traffic. There actually was a stoplight at each end. If it was green, it was safe to proceed; it it was red, you waited for oncoming traffic to clear. I managed to survive many a crossing at all hours of the day and night, and it was always a macabre highlight of the long drive.
That entire stretch of road is divided four-lane now, and the old Rooster Bridge is gone, replaced by a wide modern span just upstream, also named “Rooster Bridge.” A historical marker that stood at the old bridge has been moved to the new, and it details the unusual history of the rooster sale and the ambitious plan to “span the ‘Bigbee with cocks.” Really. It says that, cast in bronze on the shoulder of U.S. Highway 80. You can look it up.

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165 thoughts on “Rooster Day, 2017”

  1. Great story. Highway 80 rather than 82, though. I remember that section of road very well.

    You’re right, of course! I never could keep highway numbers straight, and I just traveled it yesterday! — JJ

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  2. This seems worthy of an A & J strip some how.

    I bought a new pillow top and moderately expensive mattress for the Eufaula B and B.
    It got delivered while I was hiding from fleas in motel and help set it up.

    Found they’d left plastic wrapper on and put pad, linens on over. I slept on it, remarked on firmness to furniture store. They said no, heavy pillow top. I blamed plastic cover.

    Took off to take off the plastic and make up correctly, found they put bed upside down and I have been sleeping on bottom and entire bed upside down!

    I cannot lift the bed of course.

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  3. Jimmy, here in Michigan, we have lots of bridges…and the remains of many more. It’s not possible to look at those vestiges in the water or on the banks and not wonder about the people who built them and used them. There’s a bit of concrete bridge abutment in the park near my house. Though close to a trail, it’s far enough off it that no one comes there. It’s buried in the undergrowth. There’s no sign of a road having led to or from it at that point of the river, but I do know there was at least one farm near by. I like to stop there during a walk and sit awhile, watching the water and the trees, drinking tea from a thermos, and thinking about the people who walked and perhaps rode over it. And how someday, someone else will do the same thing I’m doing.

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  4. Mark:

    Spent some online time on those back-country roads, in the 10:07 post. Did not see evidence of any economic land use. Is the area mostly grazing? None of the woods look more than 50-70 yr. old, so presume it was lumbered, say early 20th c. Kudzu, I think, on some utility poles, but wasn’t sure of much overgrowth on the rest of the trees and such. Haven’t been in real country in the Deep S. since early teens in the ’40s, except for a family winter auto trip over Christmas ’73, in and en route to NOLA and Houston. Miss the crawfish etoufee.

    Peace,

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  5. Good signs, Mark! What made trucking interesting were the differences in state laws regarding how trucks could use lanes and flashers. About 95% of the time I’d be in the rightmost lane — the exceptions being avoiding lanes going where I wasn’t wanting to go, stopped emergency vehicles on the right side, and obeying signs to use the left lane because the ruts from trucks in the right lane(s) were too deep.

    Yet even the rules regarding emergencies on the right varied in some spots… the bridge over Lake Pontchartrain was infamous among truckers for having “disabled” vehicles on the right shoulder; if you went to the left lane to give it extra room, a waiting trooper would give you the ticket a mile or so later.

    California was the only state I drove in where using your flashers for non-emergency purposes earned you a ticket… some of the neighboring states required you to use them when a hill forced you to slow below 45 mph.

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  6. emb, from Wikipedia on Marengo County: The population began to diminish rapidly after World War II. People left the farms for manufacturing jobs elsewhere, particularly with the wartime buildup of the defense industry on the West Coast.[3] The movement of blacks out of Mississippi and other parts of the Deep South was considered part of their Great Migration, by which 5 million African Americans left the South from 1940 to 1970.
    The former cotton fields were gradually converted to other uses. Some were used for pastures for cattle and horses, others for woodlands for timber, and others developed as commercial catfish ponds for farming grain-fed catfish.[3] Beginning in the 1960s industry began to move into the area; and the work force started to work in paper mills, lumber mills, and chemical plants.[3]

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  7. They had a large auto show at the Tulsa Fairgrounds today and I went. Very nice displays, both modern and classic cars/trucks. I took some pictures of two Ford Cobras that were there. If I can figure out how to get the pics on my computer I will post links here. My phone uses a new, non-standard USB plug and I don’t have an adapter for the old style port.

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  8. Back to bridges for a moment. One of the most impressive suspension bridges in the U.S. I have seen, or driven over is the Mackinaw Bridge connecting the Lower Peninsula of Michigan to the Upper Peninsula. 5 miles long entry way to entry way, 200 feet off of the water. Built under time and under budget in the late 1950’s. The bridge authority will even drive your vehicle across while you cower on the passenger side floor if it is too scary for you. A real thrill is riding it on a motorcycle on a rainy windy day with a passenger on the back of the bike. Of course a visit to Mackinaw City is not complete without visiting the Bridge museum over Mama Mia’s Pizza. By the way the pizza is real good too.

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  9. Did an eagle actually take the trouble to nail that fox squirrel, or is this another roadkill? For those of you from the Deep S. or the Atlantic Coast, this is the standard Midwestern tummy pelage of fox squirrels, hence the Latin ssp. name, Sciurus niger rufiventer. People in S. MN, the Dakotas, NE, IA, MO, IL, IN, etc. commonly call them ‘red squirrels’, a name better reserved for Tamiasciurus hudsonicus, the Amer. red squirrel, which is much cuter than any fox or gray sq. De gustibus, etc. Peace,

    http://www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles

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  10. This evening, Mrs. Rick and I returned to the Stuart Opera House to see Russell Moore & IIIrd Tyme Out – a bluegrass group – for the second time. Yet another great concert.

    Music is always better live, I think.

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  11. I posted a statement here a few evenings ago that was so stupid that I am tempted to enumerate some of the ways that it was less than intelligent. I will spare you any of that further stuff and pretend that tomorrow is another day. On that note, I saw a 20 foot chicken on a trailer tonight in the Ace Hardware parking lot. I do not drink or partake in recreational drugs. Sometimes it might not be a bad idea, but I don’t.

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  12. BTW, that bridge in Michigan is very impressive. We wanted to cross over but weather prevented it as I recall. Wife insisting that we do not probably had something to do with it.

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  13. Rick:

    ‘Music is always better live, I think.’ That’s true only of good music. But then, ‘De gustibus non disputandam est’ raises its skeptical head.

    Peace,

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  14. That was supposed to be one of those smiley faces with sunglasses. I get question marks, not cute smileys.

    Which makes me think of sandcastle and his desire for emoji. I miss you sand.

    In fact, I miss so many “regulars” here. I know life moves on. Mine is too. But I miss Mindy, David, Symply, so many others. Heck, the Village is like a real town where the stores are closing, the houses going empty and dark, streets lonely.

    Yesterday I came by a dozen times but didn’t post. I was the last one posting and it seemed sad to answer myself.

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  15. I’ve thought of lots to say but have been at the mercy of motel wifi. Plus, given the choice of looking at computer vs looking at nature …

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  16. Re today’s cartoon: There’s that water-glass-by-the-side-of-the-bed thing again I really can’t identify with, having never done that in my life.

    Well, not counting the times there have been two glasses of wine there, but that’s different.

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  17. I ran across this on-line following a discussion with a friend about the sometimes wide disparity between how old one feels and how old one actually is. I don’t know how scientific it is, but it’s fun to think about.

    For the record, my result was half my chronological age. Why was I not surprised?

    https://www.age-test.com/

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  18. Well, poop I wrote comment that got moderated and I don’t know how to edit it to pass the posting cops.

    I took test and came out at a not surprising 27 years old.

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  19. Good morning Villagers….

    JJ, love your background story on the bridge and the roosters and only one hen 🙂

    Yesterday was absolutely beautiful. My friend Wilma, took Dad and me on a two hour cruise in the country, mostly around Glendale Wildlife and Fish State Park. Dad was like a little boy when we got home. He was so excited about the road trip he couldn’t recall Wilma’s name. As my Grandpa (Dad’s dad) use to say….’wound up tighter than a nine day clock”!

    Here’s a link to the wildlife area, lots of fishing boats on the lake, campers, primitive campers…just an awesome sight: http://www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/3095.htm

    Jerry, I like your little snippets…find them rather funny and challenging 🙂

    Mark, love the pics of those cars.

    Should be getting insurance and tags on Jeep on Tuesday. My Jeep actually has manual windows! GR showed a link of what it looks like the other day. I thought it was black, but BIL said it is blue….has to be a midnight blue it’s that deep of a color, one shade away from black I think. Wilma’s 2002 Jeep has bells and whistles, shows outside temp. I have no idea what the dashboard in my 2008 does and has, but I did notice it has a CD player…..gots to get me CD’s here~~~

    I do know it’s been well maintained as my BIL was not about to let his baby daughter travel back and forth from Davenport to here. She has since moved to Louisville and has a job as a ergonomic analyst and studies physical activiites…her degree is in sports medicine. My sister’s other three children are employed as a teacher, a physician’s assistant in Indy, and an engineer at Crane Naval Ammunition Depot about 30 miles from here.

    They (Crane) were testing ammunition/bombs the other day. They actually shook the windows here. You even heard the ‘boom’….if that place ever explodes, all that will be left in this southwest corner of Indiana is one big crater.

    Long winded aren’t I?

    love to all, and pray the good Lord blesses you and yours.

    Steve, still in my thoughts and a prayer your way…….Amen

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  20. This was fun. I am 27, Sand is 31, Debbe is 34, Ghost is 38. Maybe loving comic strips keeps us young? And rock music? Sundresses? Pokies?

    Refusing to grow up? Peter Pan and Wendy Complex?

    Rest of you take Ghostly test and let’s see if there are mature people here? I am betting there are a few and I bet I know who.

    By the way, I am wearing a leopard print sundress qualifying stretch dress.

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  21. I have reached the sweet spot of life.

    I have the health and general fitness of a thirty-year-old but the levels of ambition and contentment of a senior citizen.

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  22. My sister and her daughters took a train to Germany today to complete their Father’s wish to visit the country of his ancestors’ birth. They will be going to Mass tonight at a Cathedral in Cologne. They posted a picture of it and my daughter commented that she had attended Mass in the same church when she visited in January. I also posted something about my sister and another friend asked if she was a portrait artist. It turned out that his Dad was a Principal at a local school who died in 1983 and had a portrait painted. It turned out that it was my sister.

    It is a beautiful day. 72° and sunny. 2 days ago I was bundled up in a winter coat. My son and daughter-in-law came over with our grandson yesterday and we watched him while they ran errands. We were out walking him in a stroller when they came back. A very needed break that perked both my wife up.

    Everyone have a great week.

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  23. Eating a package of tuna salad on pita chips. Most meals I eat at home now are salads or something similar.

    Sunny and beautiful here. The “Lake People” are back to relief of local merchant’s.

    No one had done laundry since February so the Chinese laundry is reopened here.

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  24. The test says I’m a big kid of 28, which is 44.44% of my current age.

    BTW, woke up to snow on the trees, bushes, car windows, etc., with 33°F outside and a brisk wind. Friday we were in the upper 70s.

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  25. ‘A very needed break that perked both my wife up.’ Steve, the Village bigamist?, needs grammatical tutoring.

    I’m 87, but came out 34. Some of the questions were ambiguous, some of the choices too restricted [steak?]. ‘Hard times’, to some, implies economic hardship. Testee does not know testers’ assumptions. Lots of tests/surveys are like this. Even after decades of exam writing, some student’s query would tell me to throw out a m.c. question. Wonder who someone thought would come out approx. their real age. When I was 5-10, Mom would often say, ‘Stop being a little old man!’ Now I am one [and lots littler than some old men], but I come out 34.

    Peace,

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  26. Ursen:

    I have been up and over the Mackinac Bridge plenty of times. Once we camped in the UP and stopped do laundry and I accidentally went North instead of South. I tried to tell the toll taker that I didn’t mean to, but it is an Interstate, so you can’t turn around. Somehow we scrapped up some loose change and paid the toll. Big Mac is very impressive.

    One the the most impressive bridge/Tunnels from Hampton to Norfolk VA. It is there so that the large navy ships can pass overhead. It is the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel (HRBT), I-64. There is a a longer bridge/tunnel in the area that is 17 miles long.

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  27. Having driven giant circles around America I have driven most of our bridges at least as passenger if not driver. I got stuck in a traffic jam right in middle of the Mississippi Bridge in New Orleans years ago.

    I had a panic attack.

    Those who drive regularly in Dallas and Houston know that feeling all too well on their overpasses that stack four high regularly.

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  28. Dad’s one cat, Miss Fluff and Puff is what I call her, loves the pill bubbles that his medication comes in. I’ll flip them onto the wooden floor, and with my fingers I’ll send it across the floor with her in hot pursuit. Funny to watch her try and get traction, sliding while trying to stop, slapping it around, then she’ll pick it up, prance back towards me and drops it on the floor….for me to flip it across the floor again. Cheap entertainment when she’s in the mood 🙂

    Jackie, have you got your gypsy outfit done??

    Started this post about two hours or so ago….bridges seems to be a popular topic. We have here in Martin County, Brook’s Bridge. Several years ago it was just wooden slats and very deteriorated framing held it together. One night, many, many moons ago, my ‘friend’ and I were out cruising. He stopped on the bridge to, errrr, to relieve himself, and his foot went through a hole in one of the wooden planks. I literally had to slap him back into reality. They have since then redone the bridge. We were so stupid back then that some dumba$$es would walk on the top beams.

    Steve, glad to see spirits lifted…one of the Beatitudes says, “blessed are the children…..”

    later gators….

    Spoke with baby sister, and while they were out on her property picking up branches, she found a yellow, morel mushroom that measured 8 inches. It is mushroom picking season here…they have become so hard to find in recent years that people can fetch up to $50 and higher for a 5 pound bag of them…been years since I’ve fried a mess of morel mushrooms. Dipped in egg batter, floured, and fried…..tis quite a delicacy here in SIN.

    Having pork tenderloin and stirred fried veggies for supper….

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  29. Found the boho vests for my gypsy costume this morning. They were in back of closet. Those are the colorful fringed vests like Cher wore back in the 60s. They hang down long and have fringes about two feet long. One is magenta, the other turquoise. Very colorful gypsies.

    I love costumes. I have never done a costume for myself or my kids that didn’t win prizes if there were prizes to be had. Taking theatrical costume design and set making didn’t hurt. Got college credits.

    This was in prelaw school. Remember that song in Chicago where Richard Gere sings about how law is all theater and puppets and Razzmatazz?

    It is if you do trials. All play acting.

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  30. Doing laundry and will be for days. No one even put away what I laundered back in February! I am doing it myself.

    Have to get my Easter bunny costume put together. Found the ears, two sets actually, a face mask with sequins, a bow tie, a body suit, stockings and a tail. Just need to put in one place. A basket might help? With prize eggs.

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  31. Jackie, I’m still here. Less going on directly in my life these days, though.

    The current soap opera is around helping with my in-laws. My M-in-L has been living with my wife and I for the past month. She had a pulmonary embolism in early March. It was a near thing– they did an emergency catheterization to apply TPA clot-buster to both sides of a very large “saddle embolism” in her lungs. It was clotted at the point where the pulmonary artery from the heart divides to each lung, so both lungs were affected. We’ve been caring for her at our home since she’s been out of the hospital. Several appointments a week for the various medical issues. (She was scheduled for double hip replacement this week which was postponed indefinitely).

    The real issue is my father-in-law and dementia, though. He insists he is fine, and needs no help. However, since he’s been at home alone he’s become more lonely and the dementia is more apparent since my MIL isn’t there to compensate for his memory issues.

    He has agreed to move with her to a senior living facility, though. They are going sometime this month. The hardest thing is for him to understand and remember what’s going on from day to day. We are working to help him, but he is resistant. The best thing is that he agreed to sell their house, so finances won’t be an issue for a while. They are both 81, but have long-lived family. We expect/hope Elise’s mom to make it for another 10 years.

    My transplant is still doing well and the type-II diabetes is under satisfactory control. The knees are fairly strong. I’m able to do moderate work for an hour or two before needing rest. I even have tomatoes in the garden! Squash and cucumber plants have sprouted and okra is planted. The only thing left to do is plant the sweet peppers.

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  32. Jackie, I googled Cairo, IL and the MS and OH rivers converging together…remember going over some old bridge back in ’75 en route to Corpus…I remembered the sound and the power of those two rivers coming together…thought I’d post a link…

    Came back here and started watching Toby Keith videos…very entertaining and so much like old time, smokey hometown hick bars of days gone by….too funny.

    Love this one where the band is behind chicken wire 🙂

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Fulz4ytZ54

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  33. Jean, I found the video about the chicken interesting. I’m surprised that I never saw the chicken. The Huey P. Long bridge, known locally (New Orleans) as the Huey P. Narrow, can certainly give one a panic attack. I’ve been over it many times, but wouldn’t do it today. In building the bridge from both ends they actually failed to meet and just put in a sudden sharp turn of about a foot, and it’s a difference that is important on that bridge. A garbage truck actually hit the curb there and went over. It’s a long way down.

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  34. Debbe. You mentioned morels, and I started drooling. I haven’t had any since I was a child. We used to pick them in Michigan. We cooked them up the same way you do.
    I took the age test. I’m 31.

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  35. On subject of bridges, who besides me loved The Bridges of Madison County? I did actually like the bridges themselves but loved the movie and always wanted someone like Clint Eastwood to show up in my bathtub.

    And no, I have never actually taken a bath with a man in either a modern nor antique bathtub. But as I keep saying, it’s never too late for a first time. Now how would I hoist myself into that tub?

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  36. Surprisingly, they found a way to add two more lanes to the Huey P. Long bridge, making it a four-lane bridge, with a dual railroad track in the middle. It scared the hell out of me as a two lane road when a friend drove me to the airport there. I would like to ride the Amtrak across it though, and sit up in the upper observation deck. This is the closest I have come to that: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13DjPgzGTKM

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  37. Turned out my age is 18, “Big Kid”. No where near close to me geezer-hood age. BTW I have traveled the Mac in all weather, snow, reduced speed limits to 25, everything. Used to live in the Upper Peninsula a while. You never get blasé, you do get better at it.

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  38. I know a mother and daughter that were transiting Mobile AL. The daughter, who was driving and freaked out by the idea of taking the I-10 tunnel under the Mobile River, diverted to the US-90/US-98 bridge that crosses the river north of the tunnel. They BOTH freaked out going over the bridge.

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  39. Beautiful day is SE Ohio. Redbuds are out… tiny tree leaves… blue sky… Does the heart good.

    All is A-OK with me. Job is good. Challenging, but a lot of fun. At least it is for someone who loves puzzles – taking things apart and putting them back into some semblance of order. When I took the job, I said I would help them out in their need, but I wanted them to make plans to get someone in there that could give them more years than I have left. So… I think that I will probably be working another year before plans are in place. But – in the meantime – let the good times roll!

    Glad to see Debbe back to the Village. Love you, girl!

    BTW, the age test says I am 32… less than half my chronological age. I’ll take it!

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  40. 31 for me too, also less than half my age.

    A local weather service’s forecast for western NC today included this: “outdoor activities are mandatory”. It was a beautiful day, chilly morning and then mild – cool to warm depending on elevation. There was even a little snow and some icicles on the side of Roan Mountain.

    Only notable bridge so far on this trip is a covered one in Elizabethton, TN.

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  41. Thank you Gal….glad to see you back here too. Contrary to popular belief, not all people can be replaced….immediately. You go girl..see, you are two years behind me in ‘mind set’ 🙂 Love you back too lady….

    Laura, good to stir up a good memory. And yes, they are becoming more scarce here. Baby sister took a couple of pics of her morel against a ruler and it measured at eight inches.

    …good night and God bless

    Did you all know Red Skelton was from Vincennes? Loved his show and never missed it growing up.

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  42. I retook the age test, once with a “real age” of two-thirds of truth, and again with “real age” of one-third of truth. Original result had been 30; the above pair were 33’s. As the final test had my “real age” as being under 33, it told me I was older than supposedly true.

    Not all will get ages under their real ages, probably the more so with lower real ages. That makes sense, as someone in their 20’s presumably has more years ahead than behind. A person of 80 has more years in the rear than ahead, so test results are likely less than real age.

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  43. So what will the Village do for Easter? I will be having breakfast with the Easter bunny at 9.30 a.m. at the Philbrook Museum, then touring the gardens and galleries and going to a matinee of Dirty Dancing Live.

    Sounds totally wonderful to me. My grandson and his parents were not available to visit. Tried.

    So grandmother will have fun. Bunny Time.

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  44. Calendar age 74, test age 34—another big kid. Fine with me. Tired tonight. Sort of sang a major concert this afternoon through/over/around laryngitis/coughing/phlegm from allergies. Concert went well, nice crowd.

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  45. Steve: Glad to.

    I do not think you are a bigamist. But, ‘break that perked both my wife up’ looks at first like someone forgot to write “wives” since it refers to both of them. A more reasonable reading, perhaps, is that the grammar is fine, but that you left out “and me”. Typos are easy things to do, and I am a picky copy editor. I thought it would be obvious I was playing with words. Sorry.

    Peace, emb

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  46. Making that video was obviously hard work, but someone had to do it. Were you referring to the young lady applying for a mortgage? Whoops, that was in the background.

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  47. “The Lion King” featured a song that became extremely popular: “The Circle of Life.” Perhaps a better title for that song is “Eat and Be Eaten.”

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  48. Good morning Villagers…

    Jackie, the sun starts peeking the horizon here around six-thirty, with sunrise at 7:15…birds are chirping at 5ish….love that sound. The city is putting in a drainage ditch along the road here, piles of fresh dirt is attracting quite a few birds…bet there is some good fishing bait in that dirt.

    Rick, one of the visiting nurses told me this…wrote it down and it is posted on the front of the fridge here…..

    “The man is the head of the family, and the woman is the neck….she can turn the head anyway she can” 🙂

    Miss Charlotte, time for you to check in lady!!!!

    Re: ‘eat and be eaten’….food chain sucks sometimes out in the country, seen hawks and even a couple of beautiful eagles flying off with their breakfast. Lost a kitten one time at night time to a owl, heard the cries of kitten distress…. had to have been an owl….Emb, do they only hunt at night, owls that is!!??

    Miss Fluff and Puff is wanting my attention right now…gave Dad a cup of milk and a few Vanilla wafers last night before bedtime….cutting of his chocolate milk at 6sih….anyhoo,walked back into the living room to find that cat drinking out of Dad’s cup of milk….gasp!!!!!! Told me to leave her alone that she was the queen of the house….and here all this time I thought it was me!!! 🙂

    later……

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  49. GR 😉 yes, that is the one I have bookmarked…this old mom was born to rock, I’m still trying to beat the clock!!!!! All the times I’ve watched that video, never really paid attention to the background….you gotta read some of the comments too, love the one that said the background made him so nauseous he had to…., oh, you’ll have to read it for yourself, don’t want to spoil anyone’s breakfast here 🙂

    Thought you would appreciate the view from this angle…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=99svrFj-G_g

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  50. Birds outside my window chirping away. I encourage them. It’s light outside and I am getting up. Fell asleep early last night.

    There was a new strip?

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  51. Dickens refuses to get up this early. Last I saw he was curled in Basket of laundry. The Chinese laundry has reopened and I have washed two more loads and hung lots on hangers and dried another load and folded.

    What’s with new clothes, not safe to dry? Drip dry lots.

    It’s not that I am not good at this. I grew up like Cinderella before the glass slipper. I just thought I had found my prince.

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  52. The current team doing the Dick Tracy seems to like resurrecting other artist’s old strips. A couple of years ago they did a crossover with Little Orphan Annie. They have just finished up a storyline involving Will Eisner’s Spirit and now they are on Harold Teen. Never saw that strip before and had to look it up.

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  53. So the age test has me at a very young 21. Thanks, but in years that was a long, long time ago. Mentally I think I’m about 25 or so, and when I look in a mirror I wonder what happened! As the joke goes, how can I act my age when I’ve never been this age before?

    Ghost Sweetie, as to the glass of water on the nightstand, I had to replace mine with a toddler sippy cup. One of my cats decided I had put the glass there for him, and kept splashing the water out. The final straw came the night he turned the glass over. The next day I bought the sippy cup. 🙂

    And while not a bridge, Atlanta does have Spaghetti Junction-aka the Tom Moreland Interchange.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfCTBRWHZ4c

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  54. ‘Emb, do they only hunt at night, owls that is?’

    Snowy owls up in the tundra need to hunt in daylight in summer, but they often do throughout the year. Have read that other owls do as well, but do not remember which. Imagine you can search different owl spp. and see what Wiki and other sources say.

    N.Am. owls include: barn, barred, boreal, burrowing, screech, ferruginous pygmy, flammulated, great gray, great horned, long-eared, hawk, northern pygmy, saw whet, short-eared [likely daytime], snowy, spotted.

    O.W. owls include eagle owl [bigger version of our great horned], and little [the one on Athena’s shoulder, which our tour group saw atop the ruins of the brothel in Ephesus, Turkey], + others not handy at the moment.

    Have fun. Peace,

    Reply
  55. Mark in TTown, great shots! Thanks for sharing!

    Ghost, I don’t know whether to be relieved or worried; the survey says I’m 22. Could I be heading for my second childhood? I feel about 35 most of the time.

    Steve, hoping for a soft and gentle spring in Michigan this year, and blessings and comfort for your family.

    David, I am jealous of your garden. Up here, the onions and garlic are showing about 5 inches of green. My spinach and lettuce went in late and are just seed leaves at this point.

    Debbe, your story about the dirt made me think of how much fun it was to play in the big dirt piles when homes were being built in our neighborhood. Still love the smell and feel of good soil.

    Reply
  56. Went out and weeded for about ten minutes which produced about a yard of weeds and grass. Out of one bed. Yard is full of blooming things.

    Going to pull a Janis and pull weeds this week I hope. It makes me happy.

    Right now I am going to shut down laundry long enough to go wash Black Jack and go to post office.

    Reply
  57. Bullet has been neglected due to my week+ bout with Crudus Majora, and he needs a bath, too. This morning it appeared he had sat out in a rain storm that was immediately followed by a dust storm.

    Reply
  58. The is true of course, my bad. We are not all Christians or even religious and honestly going to see Dirty Dancing, the musical, can hardly be holiday appropriate.

    In fact bunnies, eggs and candy can hardly be considered a Christian festival any more than Halloween can be thought pagan. In fact Christmas and Thanksgiving have both moved out of the pale into the secular realm.

    You are indeed taking part in a religious ritual, not I.

    Reply
  59. Jackie
    April 16 we are having Corned Beef, Potatoes, Sauerkraut, as of yet undecided Veg.
    Muffins and maybe Pretzels from the local bakery/coffee shop.

    Reply
  60. When I was a child, I thought nap time was punishment. Now it’s like a
    mini-vacation.

    “GOOD FRIENDS ARE THE RARE JEWELS OF LIFE…
    DIFFICULT TO FIND AND IMPOSSIBLE TO REPLACE!

    Reply
  61. “Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.” – Mark Twain

    Happily, I can say I am running three-for-three at the moment.

    Reply
  62. A little while ago, the treatment of Native Americans was a topic here.

    This evening, I found this: http://www.likesharetweet.com/inspiring/amazing-facts-native-americans/

    Don’t view the 40 slides unless you want to be profoundly saddened and depressed.

    I can also recommend a superb book: “Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto.”

    I read it about 30 years ago, and it opened my eyes even further. It is a book not for the faint of heart.

    Reply
  63. Ghost,
    You reminded me of a poem I read long ago in a chess magazine:
    There are five reasons why we drink;
    Good food, good friends or if we’re dry, or lest we become so by and by,
    Or any other reason why!
    (I like Chivas)

    Another similar poem: I only drink at ship christenings, cornerstone layings and days that end in “Y”!

    Test had me at 31, real age 78 & 3/4 as of March 28.

    Sorry to be away so much but I made a New Years’ resolution not to look at the internet on Sunday and I have kept it.

    God bless us every one. God bless the USA.

    Reply
  64. Once, sitting with some USAF buddies and SO’s on an outdoor deck, we started taking turns toasting things, after which each of us would take a sip of our adult-beverage-of-choice. After a while, we either ran out of toasts (or had become memory-impaired) and during the lull, I noticed a leaf fall onto the deck.

    “To the leaf!” I cried, lifting my ABOC.

    Got voted best toast of the night.

    I guess you had to be there.

    Reply
  65. Ghost, from what I understand, for a Chinese banquet to include a fish that’s been cooked whole, brought to the table intact and disassembled at the table for serving. If so, it’s customary for the after dinner toasts to include one for the fish. I’d think that at Thanksgiving, a toast to the turkey would be appropriate.

    Reply
  66. Good morning Villagers…..

    Windows open, rain and thunderstorms have passed and the chick-a-dees are chirping.

    Smigz…to paraphrase a quote from a movie with Captain Kilgore…I love the smell of “fresh dirt” in the morning…quick, name that movie 🙂

    Jean, I U-tubed some intersections yesterday, a few of them actually made me air sick from the aerial view…no thank you. The interstate leaving Louisville into Indiana where three interstates merge alone scare me…it’s put the peddle to the metal if you want to get back home in Indiana…there’s a song there somewhere 🙂

    Rick, no need to apologize to me….I feel the same way. Went through the slideshow twice, Native Americans were treated horribly. There is some ancestral Native American on my Dad’s side of the family….can’t recall what nation, wonder if my sister knows. She’s the genealogy enthusiast.

    Emb, thank you for your post….I recall watching on NatGeo once where a snowy owl stealthily penetrate the snow and pulled out a mouse…no evidence of the snow being disturbed, just by sound he knew where that mouse was….awesome.

    Good morning Old Bear…was wondering when you’d drop in. If I took an afternoon nap, I’d never sleep at night…I’m lucky to get at least four to five hours at night.

    I was reading up on chocolate milk/with the caffeine and it’s effect on the elderly….studies have shown that dark chocolate helps with memory….hhmmm. Going on a mission soon, look out Cadburry Bunny….if it is available in dark chocolate. I’ve had the pleasure of enjoying the taste of German dark chocolate….yummy

    Jackie, Ian has proven to be quite the yard worker from weed killing, mowing and tree trimming….I would gladly contract him out to you….lol 🙂

    Still no Jeep, maybe today. Jeep has KY plates and BIL said something about a notary…oh, well, I’ve been w/o a vehicle since tax day of last year, so what’s a couple of more days.

    Thanks domaucon for your well wishes….and God bless America.

    …coffee’s cold, needs warmed up

    later…..

    Reply
  67. Ghost:

    No, you didn’t have to be there. Funny as is!

    Debbe: Speaking of silence, the forward edges of owls’ flight feathers lack barbs, softening them. Thus, they make no noise cutting the air during rapid flight. Natural selection.

    Peace,

    Reply
  68. Yep, Jerry, glued to the Tube I was. PBS’s American Experience began its broadcasts on World War I yesterday evening.

    Debbe, was that “Good Morning, Vietnam?”

    Ghost, can you imagine all the things Twain said that neither he nor anyone else wrote down?!?!? First thing we do after we build the time travel machine is to go back and follow him around with a hidden microphone. Hope you’re feeling better.

    Reply
  69. So behind but still in bed. Finally got my pain meds filled but not before knees and joints exploded.

    Not feeling charitable to the doctor right now. I take a med combo that prevents the inflammation not that stops pain later.

    Reply
  70. PM random thought:

    I never have been much of a consumerist.
     
    I dislike the accumulation of things.
     
    I like to call myself a minimalistic Spartan.

    Reply
  71. I am something of a pack rat. I confine myself to specific things. I love books and have accumulated a lot of them. I just can’t imagine using an electronic device to read I need a real book.

    Reply
  72. Laura:

    I am also a voracious reader and have been since I was four. However, I now have great difficulty reading paper print because my eyes have rapidly developing cataracts. Considering the nature of my second career, this is an inconvenience.

    So, almost everything that I read now is on a high-end monitor. Being able to adjust the screen’s brightness and the size and choice of the font has been a blessing.

    Reply
  73. Dr. S. removed my cataracts some years ago, so I can now drive safely [but unwillingly] at night. Before that, all street, traffic, and neon lights halated so badly that I’d not have seen a pedestrian in the road.

    Also, before that, I was seriously near-sighted, 20/400 courtesy rating. So was Elaine. Our kind of myopia results from a simple, one-locus recessive gene so, predictably, all 3 ‘kids’ [now 55, 59, and 62] are seriously near-sighted. But, with the plastic insert replacements, my fixed focus is now several feet away. Still need glasses: astigmatism and such. But old habits die hard. Before, if I needed a real close look at something, I took off my trifocals and held the object a few inches away. In effect, my myopic eyes were low-power magnifiers. Still tend to do that, but catch myself.

    There are lots worse handicaps than myopia.

    Peace,

    Reply
  74. It is an unfortunate time, Jerry. As a former nuclear, biological, & chemical defense officer for Uncle Sam’s Army, I find the use of chemical weapons in Syria troubling. For equal time, I find the response by the US somewhat troubling as well.

    Maybe someday we will finally make those plowshares.

    https://youtu.be/4EIzKAGwJ-0

    Reply
  75. How interesting. I had cataract surgeries on both eyes three years ago that took care of the cataracts and my myopia. I have to use readers for reading and close work, but I don’t need to wear glasses all the time. I’ve worn glasses since I was six.

    Reply
  76. You started earlier. I was 10, and it proceeded oddly. Left eye went myopic well before right, and I had serious headaches often well into my teens. By college, both were quite myopic, but left always worse. But I met this almost equally myopic coed. Ta dah!

    Peace,

    Reply
  77. Mark
    We are MEN we don’t need instructions. 🙂

    Rick in S
    You mean cheap – er Penurious, My brother claims I invented copper wire
    when someone tried to take a penny from me. 🙂

    Reply
  78. Including us, I believe that they’ew five aides in

    Syria.

    Until recently we were on the side of Syria’s government and its ally, Russia. Don’t be silly and ask why. The other two sides don’t like us either. We are sending troops, but I wouldn’t know who to tell them to shoot at. As far as the rockets go, I’ve done more damage with cherry bombs.

    Reply
  79. Three Morning Random Thoughts:

    I am not humorous. I am merely pleasantly disturbed.

    Don’t believe everything that you think about yourself.

    I’m not sure which is worse: dealing with stupid people or dealing with my own stupidity.

    Reply
  80. Good morning Villagers…..

    J. Geils died. I remember the band’s videos from the early days of MTV

    Also learned the Beatles’ White Album, which I had at one time, could fetch a whopping $9,000…I’m sure it has to be in mint condition with cellophane still unwrap.

    Beat the birds up this morning….seen three o’clock am…..arrgghhhh!!!

    Ian reloaded Windows 10 last night, no email recovery yet for me…heck, I’m on his user account. Going to break his tweaking fingers if he doesn’t get it right this time and leave it alone. Said the lap top was designed to use Windows 10….he likes 7 better…I don’t care, just give me the internet!!!! I even have to have the Ethernet plugged in to access the internet….so I am not in my comfort zone on the love seat couch.

    Jeep Update: Maybe tomorrow, maybe next Tuesday…BIL is finding out if KY title needs notarized, if so my niece will not be home from Louisville until this weekend. Budget cuts has the license branch here open only on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

    later……having an allergy attack now

    Reply
  81. Rick:

    Olive-green VW bug in town has a bumper sticker, simply ‘Don’t believe everything you think.’ Perhaps in reply to vehicles that say ‘One Way’ or ‘[emoticon] You’d smile, too, if you knew you were going to Heaven.’

    Peace,

    Reply
  82. David Lettterman’s mother Dorothy passed away yesterday. Before Dave’s show became unwatchable for me, I used to love the segments that she did with him. I really though it captured the Midwest lifestyle(if you can use that term without ticking people off). She was a Mom that loved her son and it seemed always was funny and very classy. A lot of us had Mom’s like that.

    Reply
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