61 thoughts on “Tender in the Grass”

  1. I remember running around the yard barefoot and occasionally stepping on a thistle week or the dog’s business. We had a gravel driveway and I even walked a bit on that. My oldest brother once dug his feet in and shot out gravel with his feet. (think The Flintstones,Roadrunner and other cartoons) I was amazed, but I suspect that it did not hurt as much as it looked to me.

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  2. My sympathy goes out to David Letterman today for the loss of his mother (95). She was a delight when she appeared on his program.

    I lost my own mother this year. She was 106. David and I are now very old orphans.

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  3. Sorry for the misspelling of “Jimmy” in the first post. I have a cousin named Jimmie so the name sort of falls off the typing fingers that way.

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  4. One set of grandparents had a huge sweetgum tree in their back yard, so I could never go barefoot there. Stepping on those burrs hurt like a sonofagun, even to a kid used to going barefoot. The other grandparents had a chinaberry tree. At night I had to wash berry gunk off my feet so as not to get it on my granma’s sheets. Life was tough as a kid.

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  5. Between the fire ants and some kind of weed that made stickers, running barefoot in my grandparent’s yard wasn’t an option. I enjoyed it other places, though. Supposed to be 80 here in Tulsa today, keep hearing geese flying overhead as I work here with my window open.

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  6. No bare feet in our yard for sure. Very little grass, lots of rock, downed twigs and sticks. A chance of yellow jackets, assorted weeds, bees in the small violets, a lost screw or nail or two. Yup it could get exciting.

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  7. I shall probably NEVER forget the afternoon [& weeks thereafter] when I played volleyball, barefoot, all afternoon in a Florida yard totally covered with sand burrs/thistles. It took several months before I got all the little spines out of my feet. Unbelievable – and stupid of me to have done so.

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  8. Decorah eagles are having “munch a bunch o’ lunch” time, featuring squirrel tartare. Color of said squirrel seems to have been on the yellowish-brown side; definitely not just grey and also definitely not red-brown.

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  9. c x-:

    No pelage now in sight at either Decorah or Decorah North. In that area, both Sciurus carolinensis [gray sq.] and S. niger rufiventer [‘western’ fox sq.] are possible, and of course cottontail rabbit [Sylvilagus floridanus], unless you saw a long tail.

    Peace,

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  10. I love to go barefoot. When I was a child, our yards were pretty easy on barefoot feet. I would be barefoot from the time the ground had warmed in the spring until the ground got too cold in the fall. I only wore shoes when I absolutely had to put them on. I still like to be barefoot,but it’s harder on my feet now.

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  11. c x-p: Growing up in Florida, we always called them sandspurs and, along with the possibility of ringworm and other pests that lurk in the dirt *, they were a main reason I was never allowed to go barefoot. Looked for their official name and found this article – http://www.eattheweeds.com/sandspurs-sandlot-sadists/ Bob’s grandmother must not have known they were edible or I’m sure he’d have tales of same!

    * “Creeping eruption” is one you should be happy to have missed.

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  12. Three Evening Random Thoughts:

    The older I become, the more I appreciate the wisdom of the ages – and the aged.

    Tee Vee Or Not Tee Vee – that is no longer the question.

    Politics makes strange bedfellows and boring acquaintances.

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  13. eMb: There were a complete foot (how I saw the color) and a long tail, mostly dehaired. Parent was not interested in the tail – no meat, I guess – and tossed it aside.

    Ruth Anne: Yep, and I also missed whatever else lurked! I was/am not much for being barefoot, so the mentioned incident was exceptional. As it was, I knew what I was doing – and still did it – but my assessment of the probable results was far too mild. Otherwise, my family and I were shod.
    Of course, there was the time young son’s “friend” took his shoe and threw it into a large puddle. Son retrieved same, but stepped on something sharp. He had much pain, and we could see only where something sharp had stuck him. About a week later, after medical treatment, out popped a thorn fully 1 9/16 inches long. It had been totally inside his foot so far that nothing could be seen from the outside. We are SO fortunate that no infections set in. “Friends” like that are not needed. I photocopied the thorn to prove its size.

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  14. Mark: Ouch! I think I might have seen something like that, maybe a little smaller, somewhere in our travels but not where I grew up in (almost) downtown Orlando.

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  15. I knew a young lad – when I was a young lad his age – that could walk the gravel
    road and cut hay stubble in bare feet. Not me I am a tender foot.

    Later knew a girl (now a Grandmother) that tended her horses – in the winter snow –
    in bare feet. I figure there are too many things on the ground that want to do me
    bodily harm.

    When my MIL taught rural school some kids would walk barefoot to school then put
    on shoes – to save shoe leather.

    GM Debbe

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  16. The current “Unstrange Phenomena” cartoon – been showing since Ap 10th – is a real hoot! I like it so much that I don’t mind it’s not being replaced for a few days.

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  17. I spent quite a bit of time barefoot when I was a child, and wouldn’t mind doing so now. Alas, I’ve been warned that going barefoot is a Very Bad Idea when you’re diabetic because of the danger of stepping on something sharp and not realizing it until it’s Too Late. Of course, that’s only a problem if you have diabetic (or other) neuropathy in your feet, and I still haven’t developed that fifteen years after I was diagnosed. I’ve always been careful about keeping my blood sugar under proper control because I spent over five years as a care giver to a friend who’d lost his vision because he didn’t take proper care of himself or try hard enough to control his diabetes.

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  18. Three Morning Meanderings:

    Tool users should never think that they are as smart as the tool creator.

    Everything, of course, depends upon your perspective. For example, “A coward may die 1,000 deaths, but that also means 999 more lives than a brave man.”

    At my age, it’s better to need having a plumber work on my pipes than to need having a doctor work on my plumbing.

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  19. Good morning Villagers……

    I remember popping tar bubbles on the road in front of house with my bare toes….lighter fluid got the tar off. Grass stained feet too.

    Don’t go barefoot now as it hurts to much. Bony feet~~

    Jeep update: Definitely next Tuesday 🙂

    Geez, I hate five weeks inbetween SS checks….GR was right, one does not get rich off of SS retirement.

    later……

    GM Old Bear

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  20. Sorry about another post about my sister.

    There has been a lot of talk about United’s treatment of passengers, but Delta was SO kind to my sister Mary. They upgraded her seats to first class and the Captain of the plane personally took her off the plane and through customs where Marianne and I could meet up with her. I thanked him and shook his hand. He just said “Just doing my job”.

    No Sir. That was beyond the call of duty.

    2 of her daughters were with her they drove her home to Fort Wayne. Funeral will be next Tuesday. My son is running the Boston Marathon on Monday. He gets home about midnight and then will turn around and drive to Fort Wayne on Tuesday. When I suggested that he did not need to do this, he said that he would not miss this at all.

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  21. Steve, don’t apologize, glad you are keeping us updated on your family.

    Also, good to read that Delta went beyond the call of duty, it’s called respect.

    Here, in a funeral procession on the highways, roads, oncoming traffic pull off to the side and stop, put their lights. We, out of respect, don’t pull off and get back on the road until the procession passes.

    Again Steve, you and yours have my sympathy and a prayer……Amen

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  22. Thanks Debbe. I remember when my brother-in-law’s father passed away in 1988. I was in the procession, but a car did not honor it and went through the intersection. I had to stop and lost my way. Fortunately my Dad was riding with me and knew the directions to the cemetery. We had about 10 people behind me who where grateful too. My Dad told me that in the rural area where he grew up, other cars ALWAYS pulled over to the side of the road and stopped. Now days we are lucky to have people pull over for an ambulance!

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  23. Steve, that was good of Delta to do those things for Mary. Thank you for sharing them with us; it is comforting to know they were concerned for her welfare.

    ursen, you mentioned living in Michigan’s UP for awhile. Where in the Yoop did you live, and when?

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  24. I remember running barefoot through the grass when I was about 12 or 13 and stepping on a bunch of bees. My foot was swollen and my eyes were nearly swollen shut. Didn’t know I had any allergies to bees until then. The worst part of the whole ordeal was it was in the summer, the same week the Carnival came to town (which was a really BIG DEAL in the late 50’s and early 60’s) and I couldn’t go.

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  25. Menominee, Bark River, and longest in Ishpeming. Moved into da Yoo P in early 80’s, moved out late 90’s. Amazing that if you drove into Ishpeming at that time it still looked like the opening scene in Anatomy of a Murder. One of the most famous movies ever filmed in da Yoo P. Favorite band also headquartered in Ishpeming, Da Yoopers. Gotta play “Rusty Chevrolet several times every Christmas. Of course da film “Moonlight in Escanaba” has more inside jokes than “Rusty Cheverolet”.

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  26. I’ve been stung by bees,and the last time I was wearing sandals and walking through clover. Yep, I got stung by a honeybee. I’m lucky that I’m not allergic like one of my sisters.

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  27. Today, I’m preparing a dish that connects me to my mom and my past. My mom would save the backs and necks from chickens that she would fry. When she had what she thought were enough, she would boil them , pick the meat from the bones, add egg noodles that she had made,and a can of peas and carrots. It was a simple meal but so delicious. I use different pieces of chicken, but I do make the egg noodles. To me there is nothing like homemade egg noodles. When I make this dish I feel very connected to my mom and family.

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  28. Laura: For the same connection, I just visit one of my kids. They, and the boys’ wives, learned much of their cooking from Elaine. And, as noted here before, she did not learn much from her mom, but at first mostly by cooking for an adoring hungry husband who liked to try new stuff.

    Re food: Ate lunch on the patio for the second time this spring. Needed a sweater, but for Apr. here, that’s not bad. Nap time.

    Peace,

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  29. Have you ever wondered why “judge” + “ment” is “judgment” and “acknowledge” + “ment” is “acknowledgment,” but “manage” + “ment” is not “managment”?

    I imagine that it has something to do with the vowel in front of the “g.” Not much of a logical reason, in my book.

    Yep, as I used to tell my students, “The English language is stupid.”

    It’s only saving grace: At least it doesn’t use masculine and feminine genders for inanimate objects, as do French and Spanish.

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  30. Rick:

    Believe it’s the dg, rather than just g. Vowel + dg gives a soft ‘jay’ sound; vowel + g gives hard ‘guh’ sound. Doesn’t disprove your pt re general arbitrariness, just makes management more logical, since -ge gives ‘jay’.

    Peace,

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  31. Today was a laundry marathon – how can two people get so many clothes dirty in 12 days? Of course, one large load was cold-weather stuff that we won’t need until next winter.

    I’ll tell you more about our recent trip when I’m a little more awake. We particularly enjoyed all the bulbs that were in full bloom in DC since growing those in Florida is not an option, at least not in large quantities. If it were, I’d love to do something like this: http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/the-bulb-river

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  32. GM Debbe

    I am a “Seenager”

    (Senior teenager)

    I have what I wanted as a teenager, only 60 years later:
    • I don’t have to go to school or work.
    • I get an allowance every month.
    • I have my own pad.
    • I don’t have a curfew.
    • I have a driver’s license and my own car.
    • I have ID that gets me into bars and the whisky store.
    • The people I hang around with are not scared of getting pregnant.
    • And I don’t have acne.

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  33. Three morning lines:

    Perhaps I don’t have a sense of humor, but at least I usually don’t have to worry about what I say being taken the wrong way. Of course, I might be joking about that.

    You never have to worry about taking back something you never said.

    I find my lack of creativity to be relaxing.

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  34. Referring to the current A&J strips: I’ve been reading A&J for more years than I care to remember and I know Arlo has long dreamed of owning a boat. Clearly, they have been cleaning up “their” boat. Question: When did I fall asleep and when did Arlo acquire this boat?

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  35. Good morning Villagers….

    Don, wish I could help you out there, but I know someone here knows who, what, when and where.

    Ruth Ann, thanks for reminding me of that website. It’s where I first heard of the constellation (?) called “eye of God”. Today’s is also awesome…..reminds one of who made us. One of the first questions I learned to answer from my Catholic up bringing.

    GM Old Bear.

    New email address is 53 after my name, lost all contacts…so I cannot access my old address.

    later……

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  36. There’s something wrong with the markup on the main page. I see this as text:

    src=”https://arloandjanis.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/book-banner.gif” alt=”Buy the new book, “Beaucoup Arlo & Janis!”” width=”360″ height=”80″ />Today’s “Arlo & Janis!”

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  37. Don, I can’t give you dates, but the boat belonged to Mary Lou’s father Gus. When Gene and Mary Lou got engaged, Gus told Arlo he could use the boat. And when Gus sold his restaurant, he gave? the boat to Arlo.

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