Not Just a City in Ireland


Well, I messed up Big Time. The current A&J comic strip that appeared Sunday, Jan. 1, was a poem, a limerick of which I was rather proud. Today’s strip, Jan. 2, was a limerick about cats, of which I was less proud, but there it is. Now, I can count on comments such as, “Not another limerick.” Or, “These limericks are awful.” Or “I’m bored with this poetry thing.” Actually, the Sunday strip is drawn earlier than the Monday-Saturday strips, and I didn’t realize I was putting two poem strips back to back, or I wouldn’t have done it. Because I know if I do, well… see above. So, to those commenters annoyed by this, I hope this takes some of the sting out. Having said that, I do not intend to lose any sleep over it. And again: Happy New Year!

Buy the new book, "Beaucoup Arlo & Janis!"Today's "Arlo & Janis!"

134 thoughts on “Not Just a City in Ireland”

  1. Now why would we complain about your limericks when you do them so well, JJ? That’s just silly!

    About Brussels sprouts-my Dad loved them so I do, too, but I do get sort of tired of the same old thing. I recently found a recipe that calls for halved sprouts, chopped bacon, and diced apple that was very good. And my Mom occasionally cooked liver and onions that I really loved. It was about the only thing she didn’t overcook.

    Hi Ghost Sweetie!

    Reply
  2. I’m really surprised more comic strips don’t use Limericks as they fit so well in the 4 panel strips!

    And I do enjoy a good limerick. I have a book full of them I’ve had for years called the Bawdy Bedside Reader. I used to give dramatic readings from it once upon a time!

    One of my favorites I can quote without going to the bookshelf…

    The Postman came on the first of May,
    The policeman came the very next day.
    Nine months later there was heck to pay!
    Who fired the shot, the blue or the grey?

    Reply
  3. Happy New Year, Jimmy (and everyone else). We support you in not losing any sleep – we appreciate the gifts you give us in whatever order they come.

    Trapper Jean – my mom mad the best liver and onions (with bacon) – all through school, none of the kids could believe I liked liver as they all hated it. I’d give anything to be able to experience it again (not for the eating, but to be able to talk with my mom while she cooked it).

    Jim in TN – while that’s a great poem, I don’t think it qualifies as a limerick.

    Reply
  4. I admire someone that can write a limerick. The only one that I know is There once was a girl from Nantucket….

    Happy New Year. I am watching the Rose Parade and soon will be watching the Cotton Bowl with my son, daughter-in-law and late sister-in-law’s ala mater, Western Michigan University. This is a big day for Kalamazoo. I feel bad for my co-workers. I have 4 weeks vacation and am taking today off for the traditional start of the new year. Actually heard that some schools have class today. They get so many other days off, but today is one that they really should.

    Reply
  5. Funny, I did not notice the limerick which may mean your art exceeds your poetry. But I liked both after I reread when fully awake.

    I stay “awake” at night til they post Arlo and Janis on Go Comics.

    Good morning all. Just woke up.

    Reply
  6. Coincidentally I just finished reading a rather odd book in which the main character is somewhat obsessed with creating limericks, which is actually more difficult than other forms of poetry.

    Reply
  7. A few years ago, as part of a class about online resources, I joined LibraryThing.com. Other than what was required for the class, I didn’t do much with it until I retired. Each month they offer a selection of Early Reviewer books; the deal is that you request the ones you’re interested in and (if the computer gods smile on you) you may get a free book, in exchange for which you are asked to post a review. I have yet to get a physical book but I have received several eBooks, which I read on Kindle for PC on my tablet – not my favorite format but tolerable … and did I mention free?

    When I requested the book I mentioned above, I was attracted by the quirky plot description and the phrases “noted humorist” and “a lot like Hamlet”; somehow I missed/ignored “horror opus”. Not my usual genre of choice, but for those who like psychological suspense novels, you might want to check out Ophelia, ALIVE by Luke T. Harrington.

    By far the best of the books that I’ve gotten is The Resurrection of Frederic Debreu by Alex Marsh. The author is too young to be retired himself but I thought he did a great job of portraying a retired Englishman looking for what to do with the next stage of his life.

    Reply
  8. My pet sitter and her dad just left and I am dressed. She said I looked great, like I was going to a disco instead of down town. I said wait, let me put the fur vest on with it for the full effect! She said you look like a million dollars.

    Told her my bargain instincts were pants $10, sweater $2,50, bracelets $2.00, necklace $8, earrings $8, ring $14, shoes %9, fur vest $15, bra $18, purse $39.

    Total of $125.50 to look like a million.

    This has been my hobby all my life, to dress like this on a shoe string. I always called it disposable clothing since it never cost so much I cared what happened to it.

    It isn’t nearly as much fun if you just walk in a boutique and pay full price. When I sold cars for my female owner she would do that, have me run totals on my ensembles. I drove her crazy because she said she paid more for belts or a purse than I did on it sll.

    Reply
  9. Oops, forgot the scarf $8 and hat $10. So total is $143.50.

    If you have paid attention to women’s clothes lately you can drop that on the fur vest. I am huge fan of Mark downs. My favorite price is half off lowest ticketed price that is already 80% off.

    Reply
  10. This combines two favorite topics, food and lingerie. Got a new catalog and had already noted someone was using food names on bras, both the names and colors. Uh huh!

    Started looking at these, no love, all too small except one black. Looked anyway wondering if I’d ever be that small again, I hope.

    Noticed one of the most used colors was beet blood purple. I mean that is description! Wonder if Brussel sprouts is next to get the erotic treatment? They are European if Heidi Krum is still?

    Reply
  11. Jimmy, I’ve gotten into the habit of visiting your website first, then clicking to the current strip from here. I used to do the opposite. Does either method benefit you? One way more than the other?

    Reply
  12. I come here first thing in the morning, before breakfast. (It takes 30 minutes to an hour after I get up before I’m interested in eating most days.) Then, I read the on-line comics while I’m eating, so any early comments on the day’s strip just get ignored until I come back later.

    Reply
  13. I will look when I get home. I have a friend who commented on my boxes for storage that they looked like boxes of weird colored melons because my boxes look like fruit crates. Also that the one with chevron stripes was the weirdest melon ever.

    Reply
  14. Slightly off topic:

    A few weeks ago, I found a 1916 S penny in remarkable condition in a “Take a penny; leave a penny” dish.

    It’s now worth $7 to $9, considerably more than the pace of inflation.

    Reply
  15. Ken from Framingham:

    I follow the same practice.

    If my memory is correct, I think that Jimmy once wrote that using the link that appears here in his blog is more beneficial to him.

    Reply
  16. Had a delicious grilled salmon filet on top of a mostly spinach salad with a side of whipped cauliflower which made me reminisce about how much I learned from Weight Watchers in the 1960s. Which made me Google for the old original WW program of 1960s.

    Not so unusual but a current weight blogger says the old plan worked the best because you couldn’t cheat it. She is right and I am going to print out the food and menu.lists and try it again. WW and Richard Simmons were very similar. I learnedosteoporosis of what I know from those two.

    Here’s a link to the article. https://simple-nourished-living.com/what-was-the-weight-watchers-program-like-in-the-1960s/

    Reply
  17. Jimmy, sounds like unanimous praise for limericks and short poetry here, including mine from yesterday. Ignore the dark side, even puns are fun.

    GR6, I like that shirt, “Sweat is just fat crying”, much better than that old pain slogan, either version: No pain, no gain; and, pain is failure leaving the body.

    Ken and Rick, thanks for the tip. Here then there makes a lot of sense. Especially if the counter helps Jimmy.

    Reply
  18. Elaine felt that the old program was better, the new leaned more toward selling stuff and making things less clear. Stuck w/ the old one successfully for sev. yr., but gradually tried less. Still a much better looking and we thought healthier woman than many of her contemporaries.

    Sad to watch others go completely to pot. Among those that still alive, many are using walkers or hate working out. Some, of course, succumbed to Parkinson’s and such, which seem to happen w/o relation to health habits. OTH, those susceptible to certain problems, e.g., diabetes, can modify their behavior or not bother. Best go no further, / HIPPA.

    If you can drink milk as an adult, do so. Some cannot. Both Elaine and I did. BSU colleague, male, maybe yr. or 2 younger than I, used to be 6’+; I was 5’9″. I’m now 5’7″; he cannot stand up straight, may be 5’3″ or so. When Elaine got a knee replacement at age 76 or so, orthopod [now in dictionary] said she had the bones of a 60-yr old.

    We both liked working out, a real plus. Unfortunately, the acute leukemia snuck in unrecognized.

    Peace,

    Reply
  19. I have become an outspoken advocate again of growing older but not old, a variant on Jimmy Buffets growing older but not up. It applies to both sexes. I think smiling and laughter works wonders. And a lot of Southern sass.

    Had sass all my life. Tomorrow is supposed to be cold and I.have to go to Tulsa so getting clothes organized tonight after I.check some reliable weatherman, like a Tulsa one. I have probably not mentioned but Tulsa has a good looking tall distinguished weatherman named Travis Meyers who makes more money than anyone, even Jim Canmore, on Weather Channel.

    They say at weather conventions the crowds part as he and his entourage walk through. Like the Red Sea for Moses.

    Reply
  20. Just for you Ghost I read all the lingerie names again despite them not being made large enough.

    The one I ordered was Rio Red & Sangria Alessia Rose, sounds like a drink.

    I liked Blossoms & Marshmallows, also Raspberry Sorbet.

    Sun-dried Tomato & Cafe Creme A Roma, Teaberry & Raisins, Pink Dulce Candy, and Chili Pepper & Peach Whip.

    Where there is a name & name, that represents one item. I would say since almost 100% of the names used a fruit, a vegetable, wine or food, a chef or food lover named them.

    Alas, no melons, citrus but plums, nuts, vegetables, candy, sugar. I will go to bed and continue research.

    Reply
  21. I’m a big fan of Jimmy Buffet’s philosophy of Changes In Lattitudes, in both directions. If you hang out in the tropics all year, go see Alaska in summer. If you have a chance to cross equator, drop what you’re doing. It will still be there when, if, you come back. You may just decide to stay.

    Reply
  22. Actually, I can and do Morphy! But some people don’t want to.

    Tomorrow are burgundy leatherish jeans, black boots, black tee shirt, black sweater, Burgundy wool scarf, Burgundy corduroy cap, and black and white hounds tooth Ruana trimmed with burgundy leather. If it gets REALLY cold I will add gloves and a giant blanket scarf.

    The jeans may change if I have gained too much weight! The secret to Oklahoma weather is layers and layers and layers, you peel like an onion or add them on.

    Reply
  23. Thanks for the link to the vintage WW plan, Jackie. Having become pretty adept with the latest version of it, I’ll be interested in seeing the older one. I may even give it a spin.

    I once had a fantasy of putting Raspberry Sorbet on a woman’s breasts; I never imagine that if I did it would be a bra.

    Reply
  24. Speaking of aging, I’m starting to think that the several people who have recently told me my hair is getting darker are not just pulling my leg. I believe that it is. When my paternal grandmother passed at age 85, I’d guess that less than 25% of her black hair (the color of mine) was silver-gray. Not really remembering, I now wonder if hers darkened any as she aged.

    Reply
  25. Don’t give up on all your dreams, it’s my favorite flavor. Never done that.

    Morphy here is another 50 degrees of something, Weight Watcher’s. When I belonged in Hawaii, Jean Niedich came over with her chef and spoke to my group in Honolulu. She was great and was promoting the recipes and cookbooks.

    I had a husband in food and beverage getting his travel Industry Management degree, his second business degree and going into grad school from University of Hawaii, prestige food degree then. Jean was promoting Weight Watcher’s menus and restaurants then, they hadn’t gone into food manufacturing yet. I was interested, Mike was not.

    Jean liked my enthusiasm and belief in WWE (it works) and she had an unsold franchise in Mississippi. She knew they worked best with entrepreneurs from the area and I fit the profile and had the money to buy it. I was interested, Mike was not.

    Really bad decision but I was young and in love.

    Reply
  26. Not WWE but WW. Hal strikes again.

    Listening to Phantom of the Opera. The London 1986 stage play.

    You know, I have never seen it, guess I can watch the tape. I suspect this is Sarah Brightman from the voice. I will look at credits.

    Thank you, the Village. You gave me back music. Without you I would never have known about youtube, Pandora and a lot of what I listen to.

    Reply
  27. Back to the retro strip:

    It reminds me of something that I noticed around 2010: I never see Canadian coins anymore. Before the 2008 depression, Canadian coins were a common sight here in Central Ohio.

    If that’s not a sure sign that our economy and the dollar are still not as strong as they used to be (and are not what the politicians keep telling us), I’m not sure what else could be.

    Reply
  28. Sand, Smigz, and Steve: I’m with you on both paper calendars and watches. We’re also big fans of paper maps, rarely traveling without a collection of Delorme atlases. The large format makes it much easier to get a feel for where you are and where you’re going, there’s no battery to keep charged, and they work in remote areas where there is no cell signal – as the couple who consulted ours on the Blue Ridge Parkway would attest.

    Hmmm … my maiden name started with S. Does that qualify me for your group? 🙂

    Reply
  29. CBP computer system crashes yesterday; arriving overseas air passengers delayed for hours for in-processing.

    Many US Gubermint systems seem to be so old that they probably had to call someone out of retirement to fix it.

    Reply
  30. Wall calendar and watch, yes. Paper maps, no. Neither of us could exist without turn by turn instructions; it also has added immensely to our marital bliss.

    Reply
  31. I always have a large calendar hanging in the kitchen, where everyone is SUPPOSED to write appointments and such. If it isn’t on the calendar, it doesn’t happen!

    Reply
  32. Jimmy Johnson was honest and true,
    his two limericks stuck got together like glue
    Oh Jimmy, though comics get made,
    critics will will fade
    wait…does Janis have a new ‘do?

    Reply
  33. I have a large wall calendar I depend on. Hangs outside my office and kitchen. Naturally it has cats and kittens for cat porn.

    Also have a large desk blotter calendar and a sailing calendar. To back that up I use the appointment feature on phone. Used to keep a day runner and may start that habit again.

    Own a lot of watches that do nothing but tell time and color coordinate.with my outfits as accessories.

    Always travel with maps and atlases, old habit from being first a florist and second a road.rep. But mainly I use GPS OR the GPS feature on phone.

    Oh yes write checks to employees primarily but also local companies who don’t want to pay card fees. Everything else is drafted or bank cards.

    Reply
  34. I usually buy a cheap watch except for my Garmin that I use to calibrate how far that I have walked (or run in the old days). I’ve told the story here, but in 2009, I was running late to catch a plane to Japan due to road construction and as I was headed through TSA, I heard my name being paged as they were about to close the doors for the flight. I just grabbed my shoes along with my bags and sprinted to the gate as the attendant was closing the door. I had left my watch at TSA but it was so cheap that I did not bother to look for it when I got back.

    For my 60th birthday a couple of weeks ago, my son, daughter and wife chipped in to get me a Shinola watch. While it is beautiful and of great quality (hand made in Detroit), I am concerned because I really have to be careful where I take it off because I wouldn’t want to leave it somewhere where I might forget it. It does have a serial number, so in case it is stolen, it can be tracked.

    Reply
  35. GR6, looks like I missed the gavel/call to order, hope to view the minutes. In longhand if you please.

    Steve, I still like forcing an analog face on my digital devices, for the desktop, idle, or main view anyway. I find that almost 5 o’clock is more imperative than 4:52pm.

    Rick, from decades back I had known the Looney to be 2/3 to ¾ U.S. dollar. Similarly, the Euro to fit between the Pound Sterling and the Dollar, about 1.5 to 1.7 USD. Then I did not care for a while, and was surprised to learn there is approximate parity, within a few centimes. If I were prone to conspiracy there is rich fodder there. I prefer to think that able bodied people create similar worth regardless of geographic considerations, and advancements tend to level the field.

    Reply
  36. I keep a fairly large calendar next to my computer key board where I spend a lot of time. All appointments etc. go on it, I rarely miss anything because I also clip reminders from people on it and update them regularly. Normally a free one from somewhere, but this year a gift from my wife of a National Geographic of U.S. scenes. As for time I have a small battery analog alarm clock that sits next to the tv, neither of which I ever use or pay attention to. Would like to have a nice wind up watch, but I kill watches very quickly. I have a nice smart phone that I rarely know where it is, or if it is charged even.

    Reply
  37. Apologies, Jackie, I had already turned away last evening and did not mean to ignore you. Glad you took my shopping jibe in stride, as intended. It is interesting to read origin stories. So easy to assume WW was created in a lab using formulas and delivered intact. More interesting to hear of the early entrepreneur(s) who experienced for themselves, tested built on, and spread a positive movement. And were able to profit a living from it.

    It is good to recognize missed opportunities, as it helps us see the next one. But please don’t regret or blame. All the various paths of life have led here. And that’s not so bad.

    Reply
  38. Ursen, I’ve always had watches corrode from my personal blend of sweat and environment. They were not appropriate for dress after what I considered a short time. Given a gift of higher quality, more than I would have done for myself, has lasted a very long time. Not sure if it is a ‘you get what you pay for’ matter, or likely that I don’t wear it every day. Still feels good to look at.

    Reply
  39. GR6, I see the Crayola box of weather left you connected to the internet.

    Would be good to see Jerry, and have wondered about Domoucan. Forgive the spelling, I didn’t go to look it up, and attempted the Spanish honorific Dom, with a toucan. I remember still seeing him in the Advent season, but don’t recall a Christmas morning with little ones.

    Reply
  40. Steve, my current watch has been on my wrist for 32 years. I came into it when the previous owner no longer had need of time. I had it factory rebuilt 5-6 years ago. The jeweler who sent it to the factory thought it was a knock off due to the unusual face. To our surprise it turns out to be a rarity.

    Murphy, I remember the £ going for $2.50 back in the late 60’s, early 70’s. In August I bought £’s for $1.25. It is also much easier to calculate purchase costs without all the odd coins they use to have.

    Reply
  41. Sand, I remember being confused by references to shg/pce. Didn’t bother to ask until around the time of the big metric conversion that wasn’t to be. Trying to figure money under what was then the olde system convinced me more than anything else that metric powers of ten make sense.

    I have a childhood memory of a man important to me whose watch hummed in F# instead of ticking. I’ve tried asking family but no one can remember the significance of an Accutron by Bulova being important to a boy whose ear was at wrist height.

    Reply
  42. I always wear my Hamilton watch; purchased new in 1954 – maybe 1955. It has been through a few bands, and even had a new “leg” attached to the case about 40 years ago. Quality item. If memory serves, price was $65-$70 including tax. At least $50. of that came from a US bond my grandmother had bought for me as an infant back in 1940.

    Wall calendar: yes. One in kitchen and another next to TV room desk. The latter I use mostly for memorable dates in the family or circle of friends. So far, I do not have one for 2017. Kitchen one is up and working. Sometimes we get a free one which fits on a file drawer next to the desktop terminal, but not yet this year.

    Road atlas is always taken along on any trip beyond, say, 200 miles. Inside of that, I know the roads usually used. Rand-McNally is my choice, mainly because the on-the-map-only-road-rally for which I wrote for more than 20 years sent them to me free for my writing’s benefit.

    I think the Spanish honorific is “Don”, while “Dom” is Portuguese.

    Reply
  43. Yes, my mistake on Dom/Don. Both Latin but my Argentinian brother-in-law liked to point out differences due to the whole Argentine/Brazilian friction.

    I’ve always had a fondness for the little country that could, Portugal. The advancements that came from a country geographically removed from the infighting that consumed most of European attentions.

    And a popular topic here, they do food just a little different enough to be unique, too. Try linguiça as a pizza topping sometime. Think Portuguese chorizo, if I can be forgiven for mashing four cultures and not doing any of them justice.

    Reply
  44. Actually when on a long trip I am of the belt and suspenders type, I take my older GPS receiver and an atlas from AAA. For the rare long, long trip I also go to AAA and have them run up a trip-tik to my specifications. I used to carry an atlas in my vehicles all of the time they have been reliable from Texas to Alaska, from D.C. to Arizona and all points between. Paper maps rule.

    Reply
  45. The Crayola© box weather did deprive me of power for almost four hours yesterday, naturally on a holiday when I was home to be affected by it. My utility company has an app that notifies me and gives updates of outages and includes a map that pinpoints the locations where damage has occurred. This was in a heavily wooded area a half mile or so from me, undoubtedly the result of a tree taking out lines and/or transformers.

    Reply
  46. I went hunting to find his preferred handle, and found:

    domaucan1 on 13 Dec 2016 at 3:40 pm #
    It’s great to be a part of this village. I can almost remember the first Arlo and Janis when I was reading the Opelika/Auburn News. I feel like Jimmy is a part of my family. God bless our family.
    God bless us every one. God bless the USA.

    In context, this was following my rebuke of Billy Bee. Though I do not claim it is related.

    domaucan1, or dom to save my fingers until I know your preference, hope you have enjoyed the season. Happy New Year!

    Reply
  47. Weather and pleather report from Oklahoma. Pleather is how many naugas had to give their life for that sofa?

    Got up this morning and only pair of burgundy pleathers was a small pair I bought when I was down 20 pounds from where I am now. Most of those smaller jeans won’t come up now so the new Sunday rang a couple of bells.

    These are on and still bearable but hard to pull up or down but still look presentable. There is no room for anything but me in them.

    Weather wise it is still in 40s but misty and damp so it feels far colder than it is in fact. Wearing all the layers and adding leather gloves to drive home. Have the cap on already. No snow but foggy today. It’s a lake.

    Reply
  48. Lots of lightning last night and heavy rain for a little while. Apparently they had some flooding over in Pensacola and tornados north of us in Alabama. Four people killed in a mobile home close to Dothan. I just got a telephone call about some flooding in this area, but I don’t know where. I’ll go watch the weather on tv.

    Reply
  49. “You have good crews in your area.”

    Utility crews are very fast and efficient in this area. Unfortunately, a lot of that stems from the frequent occurrence of severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes in this area. And even the very occasional ice storm, believe it or not.

    Reply
  50. Works the other way, too. Following Katrina, one of my all-female staff and her husband, who live in a rural area, had a two-man electrical crew show up at their property to check a downed power line that crossed it. They were from Long Island NY, of all places.

    While taking to them, one of the linemen suddenly asked, “What’s that?”, and when told it was a hummingbird, went back to the truck to get his camera…he obviously had never seen one. When given permission to go into a grown-up area, they demurred. Turned out the local crews had told them that all underbrush in the area was filled with gimongous spiders, and they didn’t get that it was a joke.

    Reply
  51. Ruth Anne, I like the Delorme atlases, too. I mark favorite places in them, then transfer the notes when I get an updated atlas. That is so much fun! 🙂

    Ghost, my first apartment was in a heavily wooded area and suffered summer thunderstorm power outages regularly. I switched to using a windup alarm clock during thunderstorm season. Coworkers could always tell when my power went out—I came in ten minutes early, with wet hair and a blowdryer.

    Reply
  52. All this discussion of liver and onions made me go eat at a place called Mom’s Diner just down street from my mini vans service department. Recommended.

    Had liver and onions grilled, steamed carrots, cauliflower and broccoli and a bowl of strawberries, cantaloupe and honey dew. Iced tea. The home baked roll was not legal by old WW limits.

    But it was delicious and healthy. Skipped desserts.

    Reply
  53. Morphy:

    Sounds reasonable to me.

    However, the edge seems to go in favor of Canadian money being worth a little more than ours.

    I haven’t been in Canada in quite a while. The next time I go, I will be sure to check for American coins in circulation.

    Maybe the vending machines there have signs on them stating, “Do not use American coins.”

    Reply
  54. I have had at least a dozen inexpensive watches. My body chemistry tends to dissolve the plating and leave the brass to turn my wrist green. I got a Rolex and never had that problem. Unfortunately it started to lose time (after 25 years) and the repairs caused more problems. Sigh. I then got a Tissot, again with no case deterioration. It just stopped running after 10-15 years and is currently out for repairs. I hope it comes back in working order (for at least another 10 years).

    Reply
  55. Gary, outside of sporting advertisement, in plain print, I did not recognize the brand name and pronounced it with two t’s in my head. But I’m a gadget guy and went to look it up. Oh yeah, *that* Tissot.

    Reply
  56. Just got the two annual backyard steers back from the butcher. For the quarters that I sold, somehow I inexplicably received the packages of liver back when unloading the frozen beef. Some people just don’t realize how good liver can be!

    Reply
  57. David, sometimes proper preparation technique can escape a busy mom.

    Gary, your liver remembrance made me think of my mom’s oatmeal, half way to cookie dough on the stovetop. I had enjoyed instant oatmeal as a student, convinced I was doing it wrong but liked it any way. Then I had the courage to say yes to someone else’s offer of oatmeal and learned the truth: hot grain breakfasts of any kind, grits to malt-o-meal can be chewed but shouldn’t *have* to be.

    Reply
  58. Some years ago, a friend was looking at a “recommended diet” pamphlet his doc gave him following a mild myocardial infarction. (The friend’s MI, not the doc’s.)

    “Thank God!” he exclaimed.

    “What?” I asked.

    He showed me where it said to avoid “liver and other organ meats”.

    Reply
  59. Morphy:

    Speaking of cereals –

    A couple of months ago, I decided to begin heating raisin bran in the microwave.

    I figured if it works with oatmeal, then raisin bran might also be good when hot.

    I was right. I now rarely eat raisin bran cold.

    Reply
  60. Am I the only liver lover in group? Pate is my favorite way, on crackers, toast points, in Vietnamese sandwiches, etc.

    I make an awesome chicken livers and mushroom pasta sauce, very authentic. Got original recipe from the old Italian restaurant in Gulfport-Biloxi that had all the giant oaks growing through the roof. Camille got it but they built back afterwards. Think Katrina got it too.

    Reply
  61. Liver, kidneys, sweetbreads, heart: all good when cooked properly. Not as available as they once were. Brains: blah, tripe: not much. Mt. oysters: not tried yet, nor encountered on menus. De gustibus . . ..

    Peace,

    Reply
  62. Debbe sounds happier and more natural. She watched a marathon of Harry Potter yesterday with her dad who like HP. She had never seen a single one and had trouble understanding dialogue and names to follow plots. Said she needed subtitles.

    I told her she should get in a relationship with a citizen of the Commonwealth and a Southern woman. You both speak English but spend a lot of time translating because you don’t speak same language except when written.

    Anyway, she does sound better and asked I assure everyone she is OK

    Reply
  63. Rick, I think Gary *is* a proud Canadian. That’s why he’s more aware of the Loonie’s value than I was. he probably sees a lot more of them too. I’ll have to try that raisin bran hot. Temperatures supposed to drop around here.

    Jackie, for my part, food appreciation required learning some things are better prepared than my mom knew how to. She did great bringing me up, but she didn’t know all. With wider horizons, I found many new treats.

    Reply
  64. Debbe does have satellite dish at dad’s, no cell.phone, no tablet, no wi fi or Internet. A single land line in kitchen. I think maybe a radio?

    She has indeed been doing embroidery, cleaning, playing cards I think and reading. She says she had to.stay busy.

    She reports getting her cigarette consumption down to 2 or 3 per day. Her dad doesn’t smoke. She says weather will be too.cold for her to smoke outside on porch.

    Reply
  65. Some years ago, I’d sometimes make runs to a nearby chicken place to pick up lunch for my all-female staff, before we all got serious about eating better and smarter. Three of them invariably wanted fried livers. I always told them that when I placed the order, I’d say, “And three orders of toxic waste.”

    I miss Debbe. Seems strange to say that about someone I’ve never met, but I do. I’m happy to hear she seems to be doing well.

    Reply
  66. Now you know how we all feel about you Mister Ghost when you vanish mysteriously. We have never met you but we miss you and worry about you.

    Me, I plan to go meet Debbe in person this month if I ever make it to.frigid north. Take her out to lunch if I can or bring her some, anything she’d eat.

    The sass is strong in this one, Obi-Wan.

    Reply
  67. Speaking of which I am going to start writing sub plots for you and your all female staff, speculation of what you six do for a living. I think you said five?

    Since I have no life of my own maybe we could hold a contest for the best writer here that comes up with the best-funniest-most outrageous-printable here scenario?

    Reply
  68. I’ve been thinking of his profession for months or years. How would we ever know if any guess was even close?

    Dislike liver except butter-fried fresh chicken liver, pate, and liverwurst/braunschweiger. I had been told that the difference between the last two was that the latter was also smoked, but cannot prove same and don’t feel any compulsion to research the subject.

    Reply
  69. Nope, all the people who don’t like it leave more for us. I used to make lots of pate including the gelatin molds around them and the baked ones like foisted Gras and do en croute.

    But then I had aspirations to be a younger Julia Child because Martha Stewart had not been invented yet. By the time Martha was invented I had already been her for about twenty years so I was sorely annoyed that I had to watch her become rich being Martha when I had beat her to it.

    So I no longer own pudding pots, creme Brule torches, French bread pans or enough crystal, gold plated and antique China to seat twenty four. And as I wrote in an essay, “I Am Not Martha.”

    Still like chicken livers, don’t eat them often. Chicken fried chicken livers with cream gravy is OKie style, just as it is in Mississippi.

    Reply
  70. If I ever know I would never tell. I hold the secrets of more than a few well known people but telling is just not good manners. It never will be, something more people should learn. Think about that, no twittering, no posting, no rumours, no National Enquired and we’d lose the entire British press I suspect.

    Reply
  71. Hal played havoc with my words back there, even when I spelled correctly and hit check mark, he changed.

    I have a friend who writes who yesterday disabled his for same reason. He said it was changing his words and rewriting.

    I am not paranoid about Hal. Several friends have mentioned same occurrences.

    Good night. Going to bed with Dickens.

    Reply
  72. Jackie, chicken fried chicken livers with cream gravy sounds wonderful. I can feel my arteries hardening just thinking about it. Another thing that I’d like to try came from a throw-away line on TV once: chicken fried lobster.

    Reply
  73. Good morning, all. Took yesterday off to deal with the minutiae of completing the deal on my car. And by 5pm, money and paperwork had changed hands and Silver was mine. Well, mine and the bank’s. So Hi-Yo Silver, away! And my thought as I was driving away was, now I’m in my Element.

    Reply
  74. Face-wise, William-Adolphe Bouguereau’s model is vapid; Kendrick definitely is not. And what is that ornamental staff Ms. Vapid is holding? Maybe I can find the painting.

    Has anyone read Kendrick’s autobiography?

    Peace,

    Reply
  75. Thanks for the Debbe update, Jackie. Down to two or three cigarettes a day sounds wonderful. Congratulations! Jimmy and the whole Village are always in my prayers.

    I could use some input from someone here who knows about android tablets and sd cards. I got my first tablet recently, a Samsung Galaxy Tab A with S Pen. I set it up successfully myself, transferred files and apps from my Samsung Note 5, and used it for several days. All was lovely. Then I installed a new 128 sd card, moved some apps to it, and started having problems about 24 hours later. On starting up the tablet, some of the widgets on the screen would be grayed-out and have an “sd” on them for a minute, then revert to normal. The tablet began rebooting by itself every few minutes. I tried opening it in safe mode and noticed some widgets (both on and not on the sd card) were missing from the screen. I took it back to Best Buy and their Geek Squad told me the problem was likely to be with the tablet, not the sd card, and has ordered in another tablet for me. I still have the original sd card with the apps I moved onto it, but am kind of hesitant to put it in the new tablet when it arrives. Even if I ask them to install the sd card when I go in to pick up the tablet, the reboot loop didn’t start till a day later after the unit had been powered up and down several times. I guess I’m tying the problem to the sd card (in my mind) while Best Buy is tying it to the tablet. I’m wondering if I should get a new sd card or if I’m being excessively cautious. If anyone here has any advice to give me, I’d appreciate hearing it!

    Reply
  76. The daily offering reaffirms the long held window peering theory. 😉

    Smigz, go with your instinct. Buy a new card, cheap experiment. Other option, take it to a Samsung service center. They can do the diagnostic checks, could be buggy firmware which they can reflash.

    Reply

Leave a Comment